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Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies.

Pant N, Marcotte H, Brüssow H, Svensson L, Hammarström L - BMC Microbiol. (2007)

Bottom Line: The combination treatment reduced the diarrhea outcome measures significantly, prevented histopathological changes and reduced the virus load in the intestines.The advantages associated with immunoglobulins and probiotics based therapy is that the treatment provides a rapid therapeutic effect and is cost efficient.These components do not require special storage conditions and could potentially complement the rehydration therapy that is currently used.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. neha.pant@ki.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Rotavirus is a worldwide cause of infectious infantile diarrhea that claims over 600,000 lives annually. Recently, two new vaccine candidates have been developed but their efficacy in developing countries, still remains to be proven. Oral delivery of specific immunoglobulins provides passive immunity and is a fast acting treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Probiotic bacteria have also gained considerable attention lately as treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Here we report an evaluation of the therapeutic potential of different probiotics and their combination with anti - rotavirus antibodies in a mouse model of rotavirus diarrhea.

Results: Of the six probiotic bacteria tested, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG had the strongest influence in reducing prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and was therefore chosen for combination treatment with immunoglobulins. The combination treatment reduced the diarrhea outcome measures significantly, prevented histopathological changes and reduced the virus load in the intestines.

Conclusion: The advantages associated with immunoglobulins and probiotics based therapy is that the treatment provides a rapid therapeutic effect and is cost efficient. These components do not require special storage conditions and could potentially complement the rehydration therapy that is currently used.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Anti-rotavirus HBC combination treatment with different species of Lactobacilli. Mice were fed lactobacilli daily, either alone or supplemented with 10 μg anti-rotavirus HBC and challenged with RRV on day 0. Diarrhea prevalence was recorded every day and is presented as percentage prevalence. Test of significance was performed using Fischer's exact test. (A) L. paracasei [15], in combination with HBC, was able to achieve a 58% better protection than that imparted by bacteria alone on day 2. On day 3 the combination treatment achieved statistically significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to infected but untreated mice (p = 0.001) and 53% better protection than L. paracasei [15] alone. (B) L. rhamnosus GG alone caused a significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to untreated mice on day 3 (p = 0.009) and in combination with HBC this effect was further enhanced (p = 0.003). (C) On day 3, protection conferred by combined therapy of L. reuteri strain SD2112 with 10 HBC μg was statistically significant in comparison to untreated mice (p = 0.035). (D) Administration of either L. paracasei strain NCC 2461 alone or supplemented with anti-rotavirus HBC did not change the diarrhea profile which resembled that of the untreated mice.
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Figure 3: Anti-rotavirus HBC combination treatment with different species of Lactobacilli. Mice were fed lactobacilli daily, either alone or supplemented with 10 μg anti-rotavirus HBC and challenged with RRV on day 0. Diarrhea prevalence was recorded every day and is presented as percentage prevalence. Test of significance was performed using Fischer's exact test. (A) L. paracasei [15], in combination with HBC, was able to achieve a 58% better protection than that imparted by bacteria alone on day 2. On day 3 the combination treatment achieved statistically significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to infected but untreated mice (p = 0.001) and 53% better protection than L. paracasei [15] alone. (B) L. rhamnosus GG alone caused a significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to untreated mice on day 3 (p = 0.009) and in combination with HBC this effect was further enhanced (p = 0.003). (C) On day 3, protection conferred by combined therapy of L. reuteri strain SD2112 with 10 HBC μg was statistically significant in comparison to untreated mice (p = 0.035). (D) Administration of either L. paracasei strain NCC 2461 alone or supplemented with anti-rotavirus HBC did not change the diarrhea profile which resembled that of the untreated mice.

Mentions: It was previously noted that anti-rotavirus HBC at 10 μg/dose could not protect against development of severe rotavirus diarrhea. We therefore used HBC at this dose to screen for additive or synergistic combinations with probiotic bacteria. L. paracasei [15], L. reuteri SD2112 and Lactobacillus paracasei strain NCC 2461 (referred to as ST11 in (23)) were selected along with L. rhamnosus GG to develop the combination treatment. Complementation of L. paracasei [15] or L. rhamnosus GG with HBC was more protective than either bacteria given alone. Combination of L. paracasei [15] and HBC reduced the diarrhea prevalence to 33% on day 2 and 3 whereas it remained high (70–80%) in L. paracasei [15] only treated mice (relative reduction of 58% on day 2 and 53% on day 3). The diarrhea duration was also significantly reduced in the combination group (p <0.05) (Figure 3A). As observed previously, L. rhamnosus GG could itself induce a statistically significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in challenged mice on day 3 (p = 0.009) and mollified disease severity (p < 0.05). Nonetheless, the combination of bacteria with 10 μg anti-rotavirus HBC caused a further 26% relative reduction in diarrhea prevalence on day 3 and significantly reduced the duration and severity of the disease (p < 0.05) (Figure 3B). Combination of L. reuteri SD 2112 and HBC did not show the same efficacy in reducing diarrhea but achieved a modest improvement over L. reuteri SD2112 given alone on both day 2 and 3 (16% and 14% relative reduction, p = 0.035 for day 3) (Figure 3C). L. paracasei NCC 2461 by itself, or in combination with HBC, did not protect against RRV-induced diarrhea (Figure 3D and Table 2).


Effective prophylaxis against rotavirus diarrhea using a combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and antibodies.

Pant N, Marcotte H, Brüssow H, Svensson L, Hammarström L - BMC Microbiol. (2007)

Anti-rotavirus HBC combination treatment with different species of Lactobacilli. Mice were fed lactobacilli daily, either alone or supplemented with 10 μg anti-rotavirus HBC and challenged with RRV on day 0. Diarrhea prevalence was recorded every day and is presented as percentage prevalence. Test of significance was performed using Fischer's exact test. (A) L. paracasei [15], in combination with HBC, was able to achieve a 58% better protection than that imparted by bacteria alone on day 2. On day 3 the combination treatment achieved statistically significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to infected but untreated mice (p = 0.001) and 53% better protection than L. paracasei [15] alone. (B) L. rhamnosus GG alone caused a significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to untreated mice on day 3 (p = 0.009) and in combination with HBC this effect was further enhanced (p = 0.003). (C) On day 3, protection conferred by combined therapy of L. reuteri strain SD2112 with 10 HBC μg was statistically significant in comparison to untreated mice (p = 0.035). (D) Administration of either L. paracasei strain NCC 2461 alone or supplemented with anti-rotavirus HBC did not change the diarrhea profile which resembled that of the untreated mice.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2194776&req=5

Figure 3: Anti-rotavirus HBC combination treatment with different species of Lactobacilli. Mice were fed lactobacilli daily, either alone or supplemented with 10 μg anti-rotavirus HBC and challenged with RRV on day 0. Diarrhea prevalence was recorded every day and is presented as percentage prevalence. Test of significance was performed using Fischer's exact test. (A) L. paracasei [15], in combination with HBC, was able to achieve a 58% better protection than that imparted by bacteria alone on day 2. On day 3 the combination treatment achieved statistically significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to infected but untreated mice (p = 0.001) and 53% better protection than L. paracasei [15] alone. (B) L. rhamnosus GG alone caused a significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in comparison to untreated mice on day 3 (p = 0.009) and in combination with HBC this effect was further enhanced (p = 0.003). (C) On day 3, protection conferred by combined therapy of L. reuteri strain SD2112 with 10 HBC μg was statistically significant in comparison to untreated mice (p = 0.035). (D) Administration of either L. paracasei strain NCC 2461 alone or supplemented with anti-rotavirus HBC did not change the diarrhea profile which resembled that of the untreated mice.
Mentions: It was previously noted that anti-rotavirus HBC at 10 μg/dose could not protect against development of severe rotavirus diarrhea. We therefore used HBC at this dose to screen for additive or synergistic combinations with probiotic bacteria. L. paracasei [15], L. reuteri SD2112 and Lactobacillus paracasei strain NCC 2461 (referred to as ST11 in (23)) were selected along with L. rhamnosus GG to develop the combination treatment. Complementation of L. paracasei [15] or L. rhamnosus GG with HBC was more protective than either bacteria given alone. Combination of L. paracasei [15] and HBC reduced the diarrhea prevalence to 33% on day 2 and 3 whereas it remained high (70–80%) in L. paracasei [15] only treated mice (relative reduction of 58% on day 2 and 53% on day 3). The diarrhea duration was also significantly reduced in the combination group (p <0.05) (Figure 3A). As observed previously, L. rhamnosus GG could itself induce a statistically significant reduction in diarrhea prevalence in challenged mice on day 3 (p = 0.009) and mollified disease severity (p < 0.05). Nonetheless, the combination of bacteria with 10 μg anti-rotavirus HBC caused a further 26% relative reduction in diarrhea prevalence on day 3 and significantly reduced the duration and severity of the disease (p < 0.05) (Figure 3B). Combination of L. reuteri SD 2112 and HBC did not show the same efficacy in reducing diarrhea but achieved a modest improvement over L. reuteri SD2112 given alone on both day 2 and 3 (16% and 14% relative reduction, p = 0.035 for day 3) (Figure 3C). L. paracasei NCC 2461 by itself, or in combination with HBC, did not protect against RRV-induced diarrhea (Figure 3D and Table 2).

Bottom Line: The combination treatment reduced the diarrhea outcome measures significantly, prevented histopathological changes and reduced the virus load in the intestines.The advantages associated with immunoglobulins and probiotics based therapy is that the treatment provides a rapid therapeutic effect and is cost efficient.These components do not require special storage conditions and could potentially complement the rehydration therapy that is currently used.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, SE-141 86 Stockholm, Sweden. neha.pant@ki.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Rotavirus is a worldwide cause of infectious infantile diarrhea that claims over 600,000 lives annually. Recently, two new vaccine candidates have been developed but their efficacy in developing countries, still remains to be proven. Oral delivery of specific immunoglobulins provides passive immunity and is a fast acting treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Probiotic bacteria have also gained considerable attention lately as treatment for rotavirus diarrhea. Here we report an evaluation of the therapeutic potential of different probiotics and their combination with anti - rotavirus antibodies in a mouse model of rotavirus diarrhea.

Results: Of the six probiotic bacteria tested, Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG had the strongest influence in reducing prevalence, duration and severity of diarrhea and was therefore chosen for combination treatment with immunoglobulins. The combination treatment reduced the diarrhea outcome measures significantly, prevented histopathological changes and reduced the virus load in the intestines.

Conclusion: The advantages associated with immunoglobulins and probiotics based therapy is that the treatment provides a rapid therapeutic effect and is cost efficient. These components do not require special storage conditions and could potentially complement the rehydration therapy that is currently used.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus