Limits...
Meiotic telomere protein Ndj1p is required for meiosis-specific telomere distribution, bouquet formation and efficient homologue pairing.

Trelles-Sticken E, Dresser ME, Scherthan H - J. Cell Biol. (2000)

Bottom Line: Since ndj1Delta meiocytes fail to cluster their telomeres at any prophase stage, Ndj1p is the first protein shown to be required for bouquet formation in a synaptic organism.Analysis of homologue pairing by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes to regions on III, IX, and XI revealed that disruption of bouquet formation is associated with a significant delay (>2 h) of homologue pairing.Under naturally occurring conditions, bouquet formation may allow for rapid sporulation and confer a selective advantage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Biology and Genetics, University of Kaiserslautern, D-67653 Kaiserslautern, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We have investigated the requirements for NDJ1 in meiotic telomere redistribution and clustering in synchronized cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On induction of wild-type meiosis, telomeres disperse from premeiotic aggregates over the nuclear periphery, and then cluster near the spindle pole body (bouquet arrangement) before dispersing again. In ndj1Delta meiocytes, telomeres are scattered throughout the nucleus and fail to form perinuclear meiosis-specific distribution patterns, suggesting that Ndj1p may function to tether meiotic telomeres to the nuclear periphery. Since ndj1Delta meiocytes fail to cluster their telomeres at any prophase stage, Ndj1p is the first protein shown to be required for bouquet formation in a synaptic organism. Analysis of homologue pairing by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes to regions on III, IX, and XI revealed that disruption of bouquet formation is associated with a significant delay (>2 h) of homologue pairing. An increased and persistent fraction of ndj1Delta meiocytes with Zip1p polycomplexes suggests that chromosome polarization is important for synapsis progression. Thus, our observations support the hypothesis that meiotic telomere clustering contributes to efficient homologue alignment and synaptic pairing. Under naturally occurring conditions, bouquet formation may allow for rapid sporulation and confer a selective advantage.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Physical map of chromosomes III, IX, and XI showing the location of the respective cosmid probes used for pairing analysis by FISH (see Materials and Methods for clone numbers).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2189801&req=5

Figure 1: Physical map of chromosomes III, IX, and XI showing the location of the respective cosmid probes used for pairing analysis by FISH (see Materials and Methods for clone numbers).

Mentions: A composite pancentromeric DNA probe was used to delineate all yeast centromeres (Jin et al. 1998). One plasmid containing a conserved core fragment of the subtelomeric X element and one containing the Y′ element (Louis et al. 1994) were used to probe all yeast telomeres (Gotta et al. 1996; Trelles-Sticken et al. 1999). The following cosmid probes (Fig. 1) were used to determine the pairing of homologous chromosome regions: the telomere-adjacent region on the right arm of XI was probed with a cosmid (cos) located at 628.5–665.8 (cos l; pUKG066). The smaller chromosomes IX and III were tagged with cosmid probes hybridizing internally on the left arm of chromosomes IX (cos p; ATCC 70895) and at HML near the left telomere of chromosomes III (cos m; ATCC 70884). An internal chromosomes XI cosmid (pEKG151, cos f; Thierry et al. 1995) mapping 231.8–264.9 on the left arm of chromosomes XI was used to monitor meiotic pairing at a telomere-distant chromosomal region (Trelles-Sticken et al. 1999). Chromosome condensation was measured by determining the distance between cosmid b (pUKG 040) and cos h (pEKG 011) on the left arm of XI (Fig. 1; Thierry et al. 1995). Chromosome morphology was monitored by FISH with a painting probe for chromosomes XI (Trelles-Sticken et al. 1999), which covers 338 of the 666 kbp large chromosomes XI (Dujon et al. 1994).


Meiotic telomere protein Ndj1p is required for meiosis-specific telomere distribution, bouquet formation and efficient homologue pairing.

Trelles-Sticken E, Dresser ME, Scherthan H - J. Cell Biol. (2000)

Physical map of chromosomes III, IX, and XI showing the location of the respective cosmid probes used for pairing analysis by FISH (see Materials and Methods for clone numbers).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2189801&req=5

Figure 1: Physical map of chromosomes III, IX, and XI showing the location of the respective cosmid probes used for pairing analysis by FISH (see Materials and Methods for clone numbers).
Mentions: A composite pancentromeric DNA probe was used to delineate all yeast centromeres (Jin et al. 1998). One plasmid containing a conserved core fragment of the subtelomeric X element and one containing the Y′ element (Louis et al. 1994) were used to probe all yeast telomeres (Gotta et al. 1996; Trelles-Sticken et al. 1999). The following cosmid probes (Fig. 1) were used to determine the pairing of homologous chromosome regions: the telomere-adjacent region on the right arm of XI was probed with a cosmid (cos) located at 628.5–665.8 (cos l; pUKG066). The smaller chromosomes IX and III were tagged with cosmid probes hybridizing internally on the left arm of chromosomes IX (cos p; ATCC 70895) and at HML near the left telomere of chromosomes III (cos m; ATCC 70884). An internal chromosomes XI cosmid (pEKG151, cos f; Thierry et al. 1995) mapping 231.8–264.9 on the left arm of chromosomes XI was used to monitor meiotic pairing at a telomere-distant chromosomal region (Trelles-Sticken et al. 1999). Chromosome condensation was measured by determining the distance between cosmid b (pUKG 040) and cos h (pEKG 011) on the left arm of XI (Fig. 1; Thierry et al. 1995). Chromosome morphology was monitored by FISH with a painting probe for chromosomes XI (Trelles-Sticken et al. 1999), which covers 338 of the 666 kbp large chromosomes XI (Dujon et al. 1994).

Bottom Line: Since ndj1Delta meiocytes fail to cluster their telomeres at any prophase stage, Ndj1p is the first protein shown to be required for bouquet formation in a synaptic organism.Analysis of homologue pairing by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes to regions on III, IX, and XI revealed that disruption of bouquet formation is associated with a significant delay (>2 h) of homologue pairing.Under naturally occurring conditions, bouquet formation may allow for rapid sporulation and confer a selective advantage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Biology and Genetics, University of Kaiserslautern, D-67653 Kaiserslautern, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We have investigated the requirements for NDJ1 in meiotic telomere redistribution and clustering in synchronized cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On induction of wild-type meiosis, telomeres disperse from premeiotic aggregates over the nuclear periphery, and then cluster near the spindle pole body (bouquet arrangement) before dispersing again. In ndj1Delta meiocytes, telomeres are scattered throughout the nucleus and fail to form perinuclear meiosis-specific distribution patterns, suggesting that Ndj1p may function to tether meiotic telomeres to the nuclear periphery. Since ndj1Delta meiocytes fail to cluster their telomeres at any prophase stage, Ndj1p is the first protein shown to be required for bouquet formation in a synaptic organism. Analysis of homologue pairing by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with cosmid probes to regions on III, IX, and XI revealed that disruption of bouquet formation is associated with a significant delay (>2 h) of homologue pairing. An increased and persistent fraction of ndj1Delta meiocytes with Zip1p polycomplexes suggests that chromosome polarization is important for synapsis progression. Thus, our observations support the hypothesis that meiotic telomere clustering contributes to efficient homologue alignment and synaptic pairing. Under naturally occurring conditions, bouquet formation may allow for rapid sporulation and confer a selective advantage.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus