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Inheritance of gene density-related higher order chromatin arrangements in normal and tumor cell nuclei.

Cremer M, Küpper K, Wagler B, Wizelman L, von Hase J, Weiland Y, Kreja L, Diebold J, Speicher MR, Cremer T - J. Cell Biol. (2003)

Bottom Line: Bickmore. 1999.Cell Biol. 145:1119-1131).Our findings demonstrate that a significant difference in the radial distribution of #18 and #19 chromatin is a common feature of higher order chromatin architecture in both normal and malignant cell types.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology II, Ludwig Maximilians University, 80333 Munich, Germany. Marion.Cremer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de

ABSTRACT
A gene density-related difference in the radial arrangement of chromosome territories (CTs) was previously described for human lymphocyte nuclei with gene-poor CT #18 located toward the nuclear periphery and gene-dense CT #19 in the nuclear interior (Croft, J.A., J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague, and W.A. Bickmore. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:1119-1131). Here, we analyzed the radial distribution of chromosome 18 and 19 chromatin in six normal cell types and in eight tumor cell lines, some of them with imbalances and rearrangements of the two chromosomes. Our findings demonstrate that a significant difference in the radial distribution of #18 and #19 chromatin is a common feature of higher order chromatin architecture in both normal and malignant cell types. However, in seven of eight tumor cell lines, the difference was less pronounced compared with normal cell nuclei due to a higher fraction of nuclei showing an inverted CT position, i.e., a CT #18 located more internally than a CT #19. This observation emphasizes a partial loss of radial chromatin order in tumor cell nuclei.

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Comparison of the average relative radii of the intensity-weighted fluorescence, represented by CT #18 (black rhombi) and CT #19 (white circles) material of all cell types analyzed. The left panel (white background) displays the data of normal cells, the right panel (gray background) the data of tumor cells. In all cell types, the average relative radius for CT #18 (<rCT18>) is larger compared with CT #19 (<rCT19>). The distances between <rCT18> and <rCT19> are smaller in the majority of tumor cell lines in comparison to normal cell nuclei (compare with Table III). Numbers in parentheses indicate the exact value of the average relative radii.
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fig5: Comparison of the average relative radii of the intensity-weighted fluorescence, represented by CT #18 (black rhombi) and CT #19 (white circles) material of all cell types analyzed. The left panel (white background) displays the data of normal cells, the right panel (gray background) the data of tumor cells. In all cell types, the average relative radius for CT #18 (<rCT18>) is larger compared with CT #19 (<rCT19>). The distances between <rCT18> and <rCT19> are smaller in the majority of tumor cell lines in comparison to normal cell nuclei (compare with Table III). Numbers in parentheses indicate the exact value of the average relative radii.

Mentions: Fig. 4 illustrates the shift of CT positions caused by a translocation event. Average relative radii (see Materials and methods) for all normal and malignant cell types are summarized in Fig. 5 and were used for a comparison of CT distribution between different cell types.


Inheritance of gene density-related higher order chromatin arrangements in normal and tumor cell nuclei.

Cremer M, Küpper K, Wagler B, Wizelman L, von Hase J, Weiland Y, Kreja L, Diebold J, Speicher MR, Cremer T - J. Cell Biol. (2003)

Comparison of the average relative radii of the intensity-weighted fluorescence, represented by CT #18 (black rhombi) and CT #19 (white circles) material of all cell types analyzed. The left panel (white background) displays the data of normal cells, the right panel (gray background) the data of tumor cells. In all cell types, the average relative radius for CT #18 (<rCT18>) is larger compared with CT #19 (<rCT19>). The distances between <rCT18> and <rCT19> are smaller in the majority of tumor cell lines in comparison to normal cell nuclei (compare with Table III). Numbers in parentheses indicate the exact value of the average relative radii.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2172812&req=5

fig5: Comparison of the average relative radii of the intensity-weighted fluorescence, represented by CT #18 (black rhombi) and CT #19 (white circles) material of all cell types analyzed. The left panel (white background) displays the data of normal cells, the right panel (gray background) the data of tumor cells. In all cell types, the average relative radius for CT #18 (<rCT18>) is larger compared with CT #19 (<rCT19>). The distances between <rCT18> and <rCT19> are smaller in the majority of tumor cell lines in comparison to normal cell nuclei (compare with Table III). Numbers in parentheses indicate the exact value of the average relative radii.
Mentions: Fig. 4 illustrates the shift of CT positions caused by a translocation event. Average relative radii (see Materials and methods) for all normal and malignant cell types are summarized in Fig. 5 and were used for a comparison of CT distribution between different cell types.

Bottom Line: Bickmore. 1999.Cell Biol. 145:1119-1131).Our findings demonstrate that a significant difference in the radial distribution of #18 and #19 chromatin is a common feature of higher order chromatin architecture in both normal and malignant cell types.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology II, Ludwig Maximilians University, 80333 Munich, Germany. Marion.Cremer@lrz.uni-muenchen.de

ABSTRACT
A gene density-related difference in the radial arrangement of chromosome territories (CTs) was previously described for human lymphocyte nuclei with gene-poor CT #18 located toward the nuclear periphery and gene-dense CT #19 in the nuclear interior (Croft, J.A., J.M. Bridger, S. Boyle, P. Perry, P. Teague, and W.A. Bickmore. 1999. J. Cell Biol. 145:1119-1131). Here, we analyzed the radial distribution of chromosome 18 and 19 chromatin in six normal cell types and in eight tumor cell lines, some of them with imbalances and rearrangements of the two chromosomes. Our findings demonstrate that a significant difference in the radial distribution of #18 and #19 chromatin is a common feature of higher order chromatin architecture in both normal and malignant cell types. However, in seven of eight tumor cell lines, the difference was less pronounced compared with normal cell nuclei due to a higher fraction of nuclei showing an inverted CT position, i.e., a CT #18 located more internally than a CT #19. This observation emphasizes a partial loss of radial chromatin order in tumor cell nuclei.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus