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A perfect funeral with no corpse.

Earnshaw WC, Carmena M - J. Cell Biol. (2003)

Bottom Line: "Indeed, the role in mitosis of the chromosome arms, which carry most of the genetic material, may be compared with that of a corpse at a funeral: they provide the reason for the proceedings but do not take an active part in them." (Mazia, 1961)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JR, UK. bill.earnshaw@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
"Indeed, the role in mitosis of the chromosome arms, which carry most of the genetic material, may be compared with that of a corpse at a funeral: they provide the reason for the proceedings but do not take an active part in them." (Mazia, 1961)

Show MeSH
Diagrams showing the normal events of meiosis I & II, and the unusual events of meiosis II that occur in Drosophila fusolo and solofuso mutants. Chromosomes (blue); microtubules (green); Aurora B (red). This kinase is initially associated with centromeres but binds to the central spindle after anaphase.
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fig1: Diagrams showing the normal events of meiosis I & II, and the unusual events of meiosis II that occur in Drosophila fusolo and solofuso mutants. Chromosomes (blue); microtubules (green); Aurora B (red). This kinase is initially associated with centromeres but binds to the central spindle after anaphase.

Mentions: The paper by Bucciarelli et al. (2003) has exploited a fortuitous observation to address the role of the chromosomes in spindle formation and cytokinesis. During a screen for Drosophila mutants affecting male meiosis, two mutants, fusolo and solofuso, were obtained. In both, all of the chromosomes partition to one daughter cell ∼50% of the time in meiosis I. Remarkably, the achromosomal daughter can enter meiosis II, assemble an apparently normal spindle, initiate anaphase, organize a central spindle, and undergo cytokinesis—all in the absence of chromosomes! (See Fig. 1.)


A perfect funeral with no corpse.

Earnshaw WC, Carmena M - J. Cell Biol. (2003)

Diagrams showing the normal events of meiosis I & II, and the unusual events of meiosis II that occur in Drosophila fusolo and solofuso mutants. Chromosomes (blue); microtubules (green); Aurora B (red). This kinase is initially associated with centromeres but binds to the central spindle after anaphase.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2172778&req=5

fig1: Diagrams showing the normal events of meiosis I & II, and the unusual events of meiosis II that occur in Drosophila fusolo and solofuso mutants. Chromosomes (blue); microtubules (green); Aurora B (red). This kinase is initially associated with centromeres but binds to the central spindle after anaphase.
Mentions: The paper by Bucciarelli et al. (2003) has exploited a fortuitous observation to address the role of the chromosomes in spindle formation and cytokinesis. During a screen for Drosophila mutants affecting male meiosis, two mutants, fusolo and solofuso, were obtained. In both, all of the chromosomes partition to one daughter cell ∼50% of the time in meiosis I. Remarkably, the achromosomal daughter can enter meiosis II, assemble an apparently normal spindle, initiate anaphase, organize a central spindle, and undergo cytokinesis—all in the absence of chromosomes! (See Fig. 1.)

Bottom Line: "Indeed, the role in mitosis of the chromosome arms, which carry most of the genetic material, may be compared with that of a corpse at a funeral: they provide the reason for the proceedings but do not take an active part in them." (Mazia, 1961)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, Institute for Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JR, UK. bill.earnshaw@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
"Indeed, the role in mitosis of the chromosome arms, which carry most of the genetic material, may be compared with that of a corpse at a funeral: they provide the reason for the proceedings but do not take an active part in them." (Mazia, 1961)

Show MeSH