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Lipid rafts make for slippery platforms.

Lai EC - J. Cell Biol. (2003)

Bottom Line: What's in a raft?Although cell membranes are certainly not homogeneous mixtures of lipids and proteins, almost all aspects of lipid rafts-how to define them, their size, composition, lifetime, and biological relevance-remain controversial.The answers will shape our views of signaling and of membrane dynamics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: lai@fruitfly.org

ABSTRACT
What's in a raft? Although cell membranes are certainly not homogeneous mixtures of lipids and proteins, almost all aspects of lipid rafts-how to define them, their size, composition, lifetime, and biological relevance-remain controversial. The answers will shape our views of signaling and of membrane dynamics.

Show MeSH
In vitro mixtures of lipids form large rafts, but do these have an in vivo correlate?Jacobson/Biophysical Society
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fig1: In vitro mixtures of lipids form large rafts, but do these have an in vivo correlate?Jacobson/Biophysical Society

Mentions: Raft formation could be driven by lipids or proteins. Evidence for the lipid side comes from in vitro studies in which cholesterol segregates away from bulk glycerophospholipids, which contain shorter, kinked, unsaturated acyl chains, and has affinity for the longer, largely saturated, acyl chains of sphingolipids. In defined lipid mixtures that approximate cell membranes, these properties drive the formation of visible aggregates with increased viscosity, which are taken to be in vitro correlates of lipid rafts (Silvius, 2003) (Fig. 1). When GPI-anchored proteins are added to these lipid mixtures, they can associate with the rafts, suggesting that preexisting rafts can recruit proteins.


Lipid rafts make for slippery platforms.

Lai EC - J. Cell Biol. (2003)

In vitro mixtures of lipids form large rafts, but do these have an in vivo correlate?Jacobson/Biophysical Society
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2172705&req=5

fig1: In vitro mixtures of lipids form large rafts, but do these have an in vivo correlate?Jacobson/Biophysical Society
Mentions: Raft formation could be driven by lipids or proteins. Evidence for the lipid side comes from in vitro studies in which cholesterol segregates away from bulk glycerophospholipids, which contain shorter, kinked, unsaturated acyl chains, and has affinity for the longer, largely saturated, acyl chains of sphingolipids. In defined lipid mixtures that approximate cell membranes, these properties drive the formation of visible aggregates with increased viscosity, which are taken to be in vitro correlates of lipid rafts (Silvius, 2003) (Fig. 1). When GPI-anchored proteins are added to these lipid mixtures, they can associate with the rafts, suggesting that preexisting rafts can recruit proteins.

Bottom Line: What's in a raft?Although cell membranes are certainly not homogeneous mixtures of lipids and proteins, almost all aspects of lipid rafts-how to define them, their size, composition, lifetime, and biological relevance-remain controversial.The answers will shape our views of signaling and of membrane dynamics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: lai@fruitfly.org

ABSTRACT
What's in a raft? Although cell membranes are certainly not homogeneous mixtures of lipids and proteins, almost all aspects of lipid rafts-how to define them, their size, composition, lifetime, and biological relevance-remain controversial. The answers will shape our views of signaling and of membrane dynamics.

Show MeSH