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Small non-coding RNAs, mammalian cells, and viruses: regulatory interactions?

Yeung ML, Benkirane M, Jeang KT - Retrovirology (2007)

Bottom Line: Recent findings suggest that mammalian cells can use small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) to regulate physiological viral infections.Here, we comment on several lines of evidence that support this concept.We discuss how viruses may in turn protect, suppress, evade, modulate, or adapt to the host cell's ncRNA regulatory schema.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Virology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0460, USA. yeungm@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
Recent findings suggest that mammalian cells can use small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) to regulate physiological viral infections. Here, we comment on several lines of evidence that support this concept. We discuss how viruses may in turn protect, suppress, evade, modulate, or adapt to the host cell's ncRNA regulatory schema.

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Schematic representations of positive and negative regulation mediated through ncRNA-guide sequences. RBPx is to illustrate a negative multi-RNA-binding protein regulatory complex that is tagged by a ncRNA-guide and recruited based on sequence-complementarity to target; while RBPy is to represent a theoretical positive multi-RNA-binding protein complex. PTGS, post-transcriptional gene silencing; TGS, transcriptional gene silencing; CTGS, co-transcriptional gene silencing. Currently, while there are many examples of RBPx, there is yet little published evidence for RBPy.
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Figure 1: Schematic representations of positive and negative regulation mediated through ncRNA-guide sequences. RBPx is to illustrate a negative multi-RNA-binding protein regulatory complex that is tagged by a ncRNA-guide and recruited based on sequence-complementarity to target; while RBPy is to represent a theoretical positive multi-RNA-binding protein complex. PTGS, post-transcriptional gene silencing; TGS, transcriptional gene silencing; CTGS, co-transcriptional gene silencing. Currently, while there are many examples of RBPx, there is yet little published evidence for RBPy.

Mentions: A key biological process served by small ncRNAs is a phenomenon termed RNA interference (RNAi). Recent reviews have reprised the discovery of RNAi and summarized the current state of knowledge about this process [4,5]. In brief, a central tenet of RNAi posits that small guide RNAs recruit, in a sequence-complementary manner, a multi-protein complex composed in part of RNA-binding proteins to RNA targets. This large multi-protein RNAi complex has been shown to include members of the Argonaute ribonuclease III protein family; and depending on biological context, the complex has been found to effect post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), and/or co-transcriptional gene silencing (CTGS) (Fig. 1, top).


Small non-coding RNAs, mammalian cells, and viruses: regulatory interactions?

Yeung ML, Benkirane M, Jeang KT - Retrovirology (2007)

Schematic representations of positive and negative regulation mediated through ncRNA-guide sequences. RBPx is to illustrate a negative multi-RNA-binding protein regulatory complex that is tagged by a ncRNA-guide and recruited based on sequence-complementarity to target; while RBPy is to represent a theoretical positive multi-RNA-binding protein complex. PTGS, post-transcriptional gene silencing; TGS, transcriptional gene silencing; CTGS, co-transcriptional gene silencing. Currently, while there are many examples of RBPx, there is yet little published evidence for RBPy.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2164956&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic representations of positive and negative regulation mediated through ncRNA-guide sequences. RBPx is to illustrate a negative multi-RNA-binding protein regulatory complex that is tagged by a ncRNA-guide and recruited based on sequence-complementarity to target; while RBPy is to represent a theoretical positive multi-RNA-binding protein complex. PTGS, post-transcriptional gene silencing; TGS, transcriptional gene silencing; CTGS, co-transcriptional gene silencing. Currently, while there are many examples of RBPx, there is yet little published evidence for RBPy.
Mentions: A key biological process served by small ncRNAs is a phenomenon termed RNA interference (RNAi). Recent reviews have reprised the discovery of RNAi and summarized the current state of knowledge about this process [4,5]. In brief, a central tenet of RNAi posits that small guide RNAs recruit, in a sequence-complementary manner, a multi-protein complex composed in part of RNA-binding proteins to RNA targets. This large multi-protein RNAi complex has been shown to include members of the Argonaute ribonuclease III protein family; and depending on biological context, the complex has been found to effect post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), transcriptional gene silencing (TGS), and/or co-transcriptional gene silencing (CTGS) (Fig. 1, top).

Bottom Line: Recent findings suggest that mammalian cells can use small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) to regulate physiological viral infections.Here, we comment on several lines of evidence that support this concept.We discuss how viruses may in turn protect, suppress, evade, modulate, or adapt to the host cell's ncRNA regulatory schema.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Molecular Virology Section, Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health Bethesda, Maryland 20892-0460, USA. yeungm@mail.nih.gov

ABSTRACT
Recent findings suggest that mammalian cells can use small non-coding RNAs (ncRNA) to regulate physiological viral infections. Here, we comment on several lines of evidence that support this concept. We discuss how viruses may in turn protect, suppress, evade, modulate, or adapt to the host cell's ncRNA regulatory schema.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus