Limits...
The shape of the global causes of death.

Barford A, Dorling D - Int J Health Geogr (2007)

Bottom Line: Physicians and other health professionals often specialise in the specifics of causes, symptoms and effects.For some practitioners gaining a worldview of disease burden complements smaller scale medical knowledge of where and how people are affected by each condition.Ten cartograms based on World Health Organisation Burden of Disease data are introduced here; alongside seven based on data from other sources.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Social and Spatial Inequalities Group, Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. Anna.Barford@sheffield.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: World maps can provide an instant visual overview of the distribution of diseases and deaths.

Results: There is a particular geography to each type of death: in some places many thousands of deaths are caused by a particular condition, whilst other equally populous areas have few to no deaths from the same cause.

Conclusion: Physicians and other health professionals often specialise in the specifics of causes, symptoms and effects. For some practitioners gaining a worldview of disease burden complements smaller scale medical knowledge of where and how people are affected by each condition. Maps can make health related information much more accessible to planners and the general public than can tables, text, or even graphs. Ten cartograms based on World Health Organisation Burden of Disease data are introduced here; alongside seven based on data from other sources. The Burden of Disease cartograms are the latest in a much larger collection of social, economic and health world maps.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Worldmapper Map 444: Alzheimer and other dementias deaths in 2002.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2164951&req=5

Figure 7: Worldmapper Map 444: Alzheimer and other dementias deaths in 2002.

Mentions: Some 200 maps of disease and death are to be made available during 2007. A subset of these maps is shown below. Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 rely on a related key source of data about death derived from the Global Burden of Disease Project [19], which provides world data on over 130 causes of death, ranging from Sexually Transmitted Infections, to Cancers, to Accidental Deaths. Figure 8 shows where deaths would occur if only age and sex determined age of death, and where you lived had no effect, it is based on the life table data [17] from the same source. The most recent references to these WHO projects now appear as book chapters [20] and journal articles [21].


The shape of the global causes of death.

Barford A, Dorling D - Int J Health Geogr (2007)

Worldmapper Map 444: Alzheimer and other dementias deaths in 2002.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2164951&req=5

Figure 7: Worldmapper Map 444: Alzheimer and other dementias deaths in 2002.
Mentions: Some 200 maps of disease and death are to be made available during 2007. A subset of these maps is shown below. Figures 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 rely on a related key source of data about death derived from the Global Burden of Disease Project [19], which provides world data on over 130 causes of death, ranging from Sexually Transmitted Infections, to Cancers, to Accidental Deaths. Figure 8 shows where deaths would occur if only age and sex determined age of death, and where you lived had no effect, it is based on the life table data [17] from the same source. The most recent references to these WHO projects now appear as book chapters [20] and journal articles [21].

Bottom Line: Physicians and other health professionals often specialise in the specifics of causes, symptoms and effects.For some practitioners gaining a worldview of disease burden complements smaller scale medical knowledge of where and how people are affected by each condition.Ten cartograms based on World Health Organisation Burden of Disease data are introduced here; alongside seven based on data from other sources.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Social and Spatial Inequalities Group, Department of Geography, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. Anna.Barford@sheffield.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: World maps can provide an instant visual overview of the distribution of diseases and deaths.

Results: There is a particular geography to each type of death: in some places many thousands of deaths are caused by a particular condition, whilst other equally populous areas have few to no deaths from the same cause.

Conclusion: Physicians and other health professionals often specialise in the specifics of causes, symptoms and effects. For some practitioners gaining a worldview of disease burden complements smaller scale medical knowledge of where and how people are affected by each condition. Maps can make health related information much more accessible to planners and the general public than can tables, text, or even graphs. Ten cartograms based on World Health Organisation Burden of Disease data are introduced here; alongside seven based on data from other sources. The Burden of Disease cartograms are the latest in a much larger collection of social, economic and health world maps.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus