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Bacterial vaginosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Spear GT, St John E, Zariffard MR - AIDS Res Ther (2007)

Bottom Line: In vitro studies show that genital tract secretions from women with BV or flora associated with BV induce HIV expression in infected cells.The increased HIV expression appears to be due at least in part to activation through Toll-like receptors (TLR), specifically TLR2.Further research is needed to elucidate how BV contributes to HIV acquisition and transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Immunology/Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. gspear@rush.edu

ABSTRACT
Epidemiologic studies indicate that bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common alteration of lower genital tract flora in women, is associated with increased susceptibility to HIV infection. Other recent studies show that HIV is detected more frequently and at higher levels in the lower genital tract of HIV-seropositive women with BV. In vitro studies show that genital tract secretions from women with BV or flora associated with BV induce HIV expression in infected cells. The increased HIV expression appears to be due at least in part to activation through Toll-like receptors (TLR), specifically TLR2. Further research is needed to elucidate how BV contributes to HIV acquisition and transmission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of Bacterial Vaginosis on HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells. MDDC were produced and treated as described in the Figure 2 legend and then exposed to HIV-Bal for 2 hours. Free virus was removed by washing and MDDC were incubated with PHA stimulated PBMC. Five days later supernatants were harvested analyzed for p24 production by ELISA. Bars represent mean + standard error.
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Figure 3: Effect of Bacterial Vaginosis on HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells. MDDC were produced and treated as described in the Figure 2 legend and then exposed to HIV-Bal for 2 hours. Free virus was removed by washing and MDDC were incubated with PHA stimulated PBMC. Five days later supernatants were harvested analyzed for p24 production by ELISA. Bars represent mean + standard error.

Mentions: Since the above studies showed that BV genital secretions potently stimulate DC, we hypothesized that this stimulation might increase infection of DC or enhance the ability of DC to transfer HIV to T cells. However, our studies to date do not show BV enhancing HIV infection of DC (Fig. 2) or transfer of HIV by DC to T cells (Fig. 3). In fact, BV genital secretions appear to suppress HIV transfer to T cells (Fig. 3). While our studies currently do not support a role for direct effects of BV genital secretions on DC in enhancing HIV transmission, these findings do not rule out the possibility that BV promotes HIV transmission by altering DC function or trafficking in vivo.


Bacterial vaginosis and human immunodeficiency virus infection.

Spear GT, St John E, Zariffard MR - AIDS Res Ther (2007)

Effect of Bacterial Vaginosis on HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells. MDDC were produced and treated as described in the Figure 2 legend and then exposed to HIV-Bal for 2 hours. Free virus was removed by washing and MDDC were incubated with PHA stimulated PBMC. Five days later supernatants were harvested analyzed for p24 production by ELISA. Bars represent mean + standard error.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2164939&req=5

Figure 3: Effect of Bacterial Vaginosis on HIV transfer from MDDC to T cells. MDDC were produced and treated as described in the Figure 2 legend and then exposed to HIV-Bal for 2 hours. Free virus was removed by washing and MDDC were incubated with PHA stimulated PBMC. Five days later supernatants were harvested analyzed for p24 production by ELISA. Bars represent mean + standard error.
Mentions: Since the above studies showed that BV genital secretions potently stimulate DC, we hypothesized that this stimulation might increase infection of DC or enhance the ability of DC to transfer HIV to T cells. However, our studies to date do not show BV enhancing HIV infection of DC (Fig. 2) or transfer of HIV by DC to T cells (Fig. 3). In fact, BV genital secretions appear to suppress HIV transfer to T cells (Fig. 3). While our studies currently do not support a role for direct effects of BV genital secretions on DC in enhancing HIV transmission, these findings do not rule out the possibility that BV promotes HIV transmission by altering DC function or trafficking in vivo.

Bottom Line: In vitro studies show that genital tract secretions from women with BV or flora associated with BV induce HIV expression in infected cells.The increased HIV expression appears to be due at least in part to activation through Toll-like receptors (TLR), specifically TLR2.Further research is needed to elucidate how BV contributes to HIV acquisition and transmission.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Immunology/Microbiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. gspear@rush.edu

ABSTRACT
Epidemiologic studies indicate that bacterial vaginosis (BV), a common alteration of lower genital tract flora in women, is associated with increased susceptibility to HIV infection. Other recent studies show that HIV is detected more frequently and at higher levels in the lower genital tract of HIV-seropositive women with BV. In vitro studies show that genital tract secretions from women with BV or flora associated with BV induce HIV expression in infected cells. The increased HIV expression appears to be due at least in part to activation through Toll-like receptors (TLR), specifically TLR2. Further research is needed to elucidate how BV contributes to HIV acquisition and transmission.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus