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Impact of salinomycin on the intestinal microflora of broiler chickens.

Johansen CH, Bjerrum L, Pedersen K - Acta Vet. Scand. (2007)

Bottom Line: We found no effect of salinomycin on C. jejuni but salinomycin significantly affected the composition of the microflora.In addition, salinomycin significantly reduced the prevalence of Clostridium perfringens and we observed a significant increase (62%) in the mean body weight of salinomycin treated chickens compared to un-treated controls.Termination of the use of ionophore coccidiostats will not affect food safety related to campylobacter, but will increase the risk of necrotic enteritis in the broilers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Hangøvej 2, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. cjo@vet.dtu.dk

ABSTRACT

Background: The ionophoric coccidiostat salinomycin is widely used in chicken feed. In the near future the use of ionophore coccidiostats may be banned as has been the case for other antimicrobial growth promoters. This study was conducted to examine the effect of salinomycin on Campylobacter jejuni infection and on the composition of the caecal microflora in broiler chickens.

Methods: An experimental infection study was carried out in isolators and the intestinal microflora was analyzed using quantitative cultivation, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), cloning and sequencing.

Results: We found no effect of salinomycin on C. jejuni but salinomycin significantly affected the composition of the microflora. In addition, salinomycin significantly reduced the prevalence of Clostridium perfringens and we observed a significant increase (62%) in the mean body weight of salinomycin treated chickens compared to un-treated controls.

Conclusion: Termination of the use of ionophore coccidiostats will not affect food safety related to campylobacter, but will increase the risk of necrotic enteritis in the broilers.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Clustering of 40 clones (numbered) and 22 well-known bacteria (listed above), based on sequence analysis of 16s rDNA. In the neighbor joining distance tree, branch lengths reflects genetic distances and bootstrap values, obtained from 1000 resampled datasets, are shown in italics.
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Figure 3: Clustering of 40 clones (numbered) and 22 well-known bacteria (listed above), based on sequence analysis of 16s rDNA. In the neighbor joining distance tree, branch lengths reflects genetic distances and bootstrap values, obtained from 1000 resampled datasets, are shown in italics.

Mentions: A total of 49 clones were chosen for sequencing on basis of their different migrations in the DGGE, giving 48 useful sequences (Table 4). The caecal samples, from which the clones originated, are shown in Table 4. Blasting the sequences resulted in two clones being most closely related to C. jejuni, 2 to Clostridium neonatale, 1 to Lactobacillus sp. and 3 were most closely related to Shigella boydii and E. coli. Forty sequences were most closely related to an uncultured bacterium. All sequences were aligned and phylogenetically analyzed in order to identify, which groups of well-known bacteria they were related to. A neighbor joining distance tree (Figure 3) showed that 12 clones clustered with ruminococci. Seventy-five per cent of these originated from non-treated caecal samples. Another group of 7 clones clustered with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and related organisms. These clones all originated from caecal samples taken at 30 days of age (3 different treatments). The remaining clones clustered among E. coli, C. jejuni and different clostridia or lactobacilli. Two of the clones originating from salinomycin treated chickens were related to Clostridium or Lactobacillus sp. respectively.


Impact of salinomycin on the intestinal microflora of broiler chickens.

Johansen CH, Bjerrum L, Pedersen K - Acta Vet. Scand. (2007)

Clustering of 40 clones (numbered) and 22 well-known bacteria (listed above), based on sequence analysis of 16s rDNA. In the neighbor joining distance tree, branch lengths reflects genetic distances and bootstrap values, obtained from 1000 resampled datasets, are shown in italics.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2164938&req=5

Figure 3: Clustering of 40 clones (numbered) and 22 well-known bacteria (listed above), based on sequence analysis of 16s rDNA. In the neighbor joining distance tree, branch lengths reflects genetic distances and bootstrap values, obtained from 1000 resampled datasets, are shown in italics.
Mentions: A total of 49 clones were chosen for sequencing on basis of their different migrations in the DGGE, giving 48 useful sequences (Table 4). The caecal samples, from which the clones originated, are shown in Table 4. Blasting the sequences resulted in two clones being most closely related to C. jejuni, 2 to Clostridium neonatale, 1 to Lactobacillus sp. and 3 were most closely related to Shigella boydii and E. coli. Forty sequences were most closely related to an uncultured bacterium. All sequences were aligned and phylogenetically analyzed in order to identify, which groups of well-known bacteria they were related to. A neighbor joining distance tree (Figure 3) showed that 12 clones clustered with ruminococci. Seventy-five per cent of these originated from non-treated caecal samples. Another group of 7 clones clustered with Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and related organisms. These clones all originated from caecal samples taken at 30 days of age (3 different treatments). The remaining clones clustered among E. coli, C. jejuni and different clostridia or lactobacilli. Two of the clones originating from salinomycin treated chickens were related to Clostridium or Lactobacillus sp. respectively.

Bottom Line: We found no effect of salinomycin on C. jejuni but salinomycin significantly affected the composition of the microflora.In addition, salinomycin significantly reduced the prevalence of Clostridium perfringens and we observed a significant increase (62%) in the mean body weight of salinomycin treated chickens compared to un-treated controls.Termination of the use of ionophore coccidiostats will not affect food safety related to campylobacter, but will increase the risk of necrotic enteritis in the broilers.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: National Veterinary Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Hangøvej 2, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark. cjo@vet.dtu.dk

ABSTRACT

Background: The ionophoric coccidiostat salinomycin is widely used in chicken feed. In the near future the use of ionophore coccidiostats may be banned as has been the case for other antimicrobial growth promoters. This study was conducted to examine the effect of salinomycin on Campylobacter jejuni infection and on the composition of the caecal microflora in broiler chickens.

Methods: An experimental infection study was carried out in isolators and the intestinal microflora was analyzed using quantitative cultivation, denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), cloning and sequencing.

Results: We found no effect of salinomycin on C. jejuni but salinomycin significantly affected the composition of the microflora. In addition, salinomycin significantly reduced the prevalence of Clostridium perfringens and we observed a significant increase (62%) in the mean body weight of salinomycin treated chickens compared to un-treated controls.

Conclusion: Termination of the use of ionophore coccidiostats will not affect food safety related to campylobacter, but will increase the risk of necrotic enteritis in the broilers.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus