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The dental caries pandemic and disparities problem.

Edelstein BL - BMC Oral Health (2006)

Bottom Line: Understanding caries etiology and distribution is central to understanding potential opportunities for and likely impact of new biotechnologies and biomaterials to reduce the caries burden worldwide.Oral health disparities within and between countries are related to sugar consumption, fluoride usage, dental care, and social determinants of health.Findings of international and U.S. studies are considered in promoting World Health Organization's and others' recommendations for science-based preventive and disease management interventions at the individual, clinical, public health, and public policy levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Dental Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ble22@columbia.edu

ABSTRACT
Understanding caries etiology and distribution is central to understanding potential opportunities for and likely impact of new biotechnologies and biomaterials to reduce the caries burden worldwide. This review asserts the appropriateness of characterizing caries as a "pandemic" and considers static and temporal trend reports of worldwide caries distribution. Oral health disparities within and between countries are related to sugar consumption, fluoride usage, dental care, and social determinants of health. Findings of international and U.S. studies are considered in promoting World Health Organization's and others' recommendations for science-based preventive and disease management interventions at the individual, clinical, public health, and public policy levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Dental caries levels (DMFT) of 12-year-olds worldwide. World Health Organization [2].
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Figure 1: Dental caries levels (DMFT) of 12-year-olds worldwide. World Health Organization [2].

Mentions: The World Health Organization's 2003 report on oral health [2] provides an overview of global caries epidemiology that confirms its international pandemic distribution. Globally, WHO reports caries prevalence in school-age children at 60–90% and as virtually universal among adults in the majority of countries [3]. Because so few countries are spared high levels of this disease, caries maps typically display disease severity rather than prevalence. Figure 1 displays caries distribution among 12 year olds by average numbers of teeth affected, using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index of severity. The map shows a clear pattern of higher disease experience in North and South America, Western Europe, and much of Africa; more moderate disease experience in much of South America, Russia, and the former Soviet Republics; and low levels of disease in Eastern Africa, China, Australia, and Greenland. While the correlation between caries rates and national development is not tight, WHO has observed that developed countries have higher rates of caries experience, while developing countries have lower rates [2]. WHO has attributed these differences to the relative availability of simple sugars in diets, to fluoride, and to dental treatment. U.S. findings by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) [4] released in August 2005 reveal high ongoing prevalence of dental caries in children, with 27% of preschoolers, 42% of school-age children, and 91% of dentate adults having caries experience. Paralleling international findings of country [5,6] and family level [7,8] income-related disparities (dubbed "dental caries polarization") [9], the new U.S. report reveals ongoing [10] marked disparities by income. For example, primary tooth caries prevalence is 1.8 times greater for children of poverty than for those with incomes twice the poverty level.


The dental caries pandemic and disparities problem.

Edelstein BL - BMC Oral Health (2006)

Dental caries levels (DMFT) of 12-year-olds worldwide. World Health Organization [2].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2147591&req=5

Figure 1: Dental caries levels (DMFT) of 12-year-olds worldwide. World Health Organization [2].
Mentions: The World Health Organization's 2003 report on oral health [2] provides an overview of global caries epidemiology that confirms its international pandemic distribution. Globally, WHO reports caries prevalence in school-age children at 60–90% and as virtually universal among adults in the majority of countries [3]. Because so few countries are spared high levels of this disease, caries maps typically display disease severity rather than prevalence. Figure 1 displays caries distribution among 12 year olds by average numbers of teeth affected, using the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index of severity. The map shows a clear pattern of higher disease experience in North and South America, Western Europe, and much of Africa; more moderate disease experience in much of South America, Russia, and the former Soviet Republics; and low levels of disease in Eastern Africa, China, Australia, and Greenland. While the correlation between caries rates and national development is not tight, WHO has observed that developed countries have higher rates of caries experience, while developing countries have lower rates [2]. WHO has attributed these differences to the relative availability of simple sugars in diets, to fluoride, and to dental treatment. U.S. findings by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) [4] released in August 2005 reveal high ongoing prevalence of dental caries in children, with 27% of preschoolers, 42% of school-age children, and 91% of dentate adults having caries experience. Paralleling international findings of country [5,6] and family level [7,8] income-related disparities (dubbed "dental caries polarization") [9], the new U.S. report reveals ongoing [10] marked disparities by income. For example, primary tooth caries prevalence is 1.8 times greater for children of poverty than for those with incomes twice the poverty level.

Bottom Line: Understanding caries etiology and distribution is central to understanding potential opportunities for and likely impact of new biotechnologies and biomaterials to reduce the caries burden worldwide.Oral health disparities within and between countries are related to sugar consumption, fluoride usage, dental care, and social determinants of health.Findings of international and U.S. studies are considered in promoting World Health Organization's and others' recommendations for science-based preventive and disease management interventions at the individual, clinical, public health, and public policy levels.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Social and Behavioral Sciences, College of Dental Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. ble22@columbia.edu

ABSTRACT
Understanding caries etiology and distribution is central to understanding potential opportunities for and likely impact of new biotechnologies and biomaterials to reduce the caries burden worldwide. This review asserts the appropriateness of characterizing caries as a "pandemic" and considers static and temporal trend reports of worldwide caries distribution. Oral health disparities within and between countries are related to sugar consumption, fluoride usage, dental care, and social determinants of health. Findings of international and U.S. studies are considered in promoting World Health Organization's and others' recommendations for science-based preventive and disease management interventions at the individual, clinical, public health, and public policy levels.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus