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Multi-locus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae isolates from three continents reveals hypervirulent and feline-associated clones.

Arvand M, Feil EJ, Giladi M, Boulouis HJ, Viezens J - PLoS ONE (2007)

Bottom Line: Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease.The difference in host association of STs 1 (human) and 7 (feline) was statistically significant (P< or =0.001). eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7.These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene, Universität Rostock, Rostock, Germany. mardjan.arvand@med.uni-rostock.de

ABSTRACT
Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of cat scratch disease and a variety of other disease manifestations in humans. Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease. In the present study, 182 human and feline B. henselae isolates from Europe, North America and Australia were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to detect any associations between sequence type (ST), host species and geographical distribution of the isolates. A total of 14 sequence types were detected, but over 66% (16/24) of the isolates recovered from human disease corresponded to a single genotype, ST1, and this type was detected in all three continents. In contrast, 27.2% (43/158) of the feline isolates corresponded to ST7, but this ST was not recovered from humans and was restricted to Europe. The difference in host association of STs 1 (human) and 7 (feline) was statistically significant (P< or =0.001). eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7. These groups were broadly consistent with a neighbour-joining tree, although splits decomposition analysis was indicative of a history of recombination. These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

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Splits decomposition was used to detect evidence for a past history of recombination in the sequences.The extensive reticulation suggests that recombination has occurred relatively frequently. However, Group 1 remains distinct (as indicated by the filled oval).
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pone-0001346-g005: Splits decomposition was used to detect evidence for a past history of recombination in the sequences.The extensive reticulation suggests that recombination has occurred relatively frequently. However, Group 1 remains distinct (as indicated by the filled oval).

Mentions: Iredell et al [22] noted evidence for recombination from their MLST data, and to explore this issue further we used splits decomposition analysis as implemented in Splitstree4 [26]. The approach examines the degree to which the data correspond to a bifurcating tree, which would indicate limited recombination, or alternatively a network structure, which would be consistent with more frequent recombination. Figure 5 shows that the approach resulted in extensive reticulation between the STs, which is consistent with a history of recombination. Furthermore, the phi test, as implemented in Splitstree4, revealed significant evidence for recombination (P<0.004). Splits decomposition analysis also confirmed the delineation of Group 1, and placed ST7 as a distinct genotype more closely related to Groups 2 and 3 than to Group 1.


Multi-locus sequence typing of Bartonella henselae isolates from three continents reveals hypervirulent and feline-associated clones.

Arvand M, Feil EJ, Giladi M, Boulouis HJ, Viezens J - PLoS ONE (2007)

Splits decomposition was used to detect evidence for a past history of recombination in the sequences.The extensive reticulation suggests that recombination has occurred relatively frequently. However, Group 1 remains distinct (as indicated by the filled oval).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2147075&req=5

pone-0001346-g005: Splits decomposition was used to detect evidence for a past history of recombination in the sequences.The extensive reticulation suggests that recombination has occurred relatively frequently. However, Group 1 remains distinct (as indicated by the filled oval).
Mentions: Iredell et al [22] noted evidence for recombination from their MLST data, and to explore this issue further we used splits decomposition analysis as implemented in Splitstree4 [26]. The approach examines the degree to which the data correspond to a bifurcating tree, which would indicate limited recombination, or alternatively a network structure, which would be consistent with more frequent recombination. Figure 5 shows that the approach resulted in extensive reticulation between the STs, which is consistent with a history of recombination. Furthermore, the phi test, as implemented in Splitstree4, revealed significant evidence for recombination (P<0.004). Splits decomposition analysis also confirmed the delineation of Group 1, and placed ST7 as a distinct genotype more closely related to Groups 2 and 3 than to Group 1.

Bottom Line: Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease.The difference in host association of STs 1 (human) and 7 (feline) was statistically significant (P< or =0.001). eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7.These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut für Medizinische Mikrobiologie, Virologie und Hygiene, Universität Rostock, Rostock, Germany. mardjan.arvand@med.uni-rostock.de

ABSTRACT
Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic pathogen and the causative agent of cat scratch disease and a variety of other disease manifestations in humans. Previous investigations have suggested that a limited subset of B. henselae isolates may be associated with human disease. In the present study, 182 human and feline B. henselae isolates from Europe, North America and Australia were analysed by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) to detect any associations between sequence type (ST), host species and geographical distribution of the isolates. A total of 14 sequence types were detected, but over 66% (16/24) of the isolates recovered from human disease corresponded to a single genotype, ST1, and this type was detected in all three continents. In contrast, 27.2% (43/158) of the feline isolates corresponded to ST7, but this ST was not recovered from humans and was restricted to Europe. The difference in host association of STs 1 (human) and 7 (feline) was statistically significant (P< or =0.001). eBURST analysis assigned the 14 STs to three clonal lineages, which contained two or more STs, and a singleton comprising ST7. These groups were broadly consistent with a neighbour-joining tree, although splits decomposition analysis was indicative of a history of recombination. These data indicate that B. henselae lineages differ in their virulence properties for humans and contribute to a better understanding of the population structure of B. henselae.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus