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Statistical analysis and significance testing of serial analysis of gene expression data using a Poisson mixture model.

Zuyderduyn SD - BMC Bioinformatics (2007)

Bottom Line: Several models have been proposed to account for this effect, all of which utilize a continuous prior distribution to explain the excess variance.The goodness of fit of the Poisson mixture model on 15 sets of biological SAGE replicates is compared to the previously proposed hierarchical gamma-Poisson (negative binomial) model, and a substantial improvement is seen.Code for the R statistical software package is included to assist investigators in applying this model to their own data.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Victor Ling Laboratory, Department of Cancer Genetics and Developmental Biology, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Ave,, Vancouver, Canada. scottz@bccrc.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is used to obtain quantitative snapshots of the transcriptome. These profiles are count-based and are assumed to follow a Binomial or Poisson distribution. However, tag counts observed across multiple libraries (for example, one or more groups of biological replicates) have additional variance that cannot be accommodated by this assumption alone. Several models have been proposed to account for this effect, all of which utilize a continuous prior distribution to explain the excess variance. Here, a Poisson mixture model, which assumes excess variability arises from sampling a mixture of distinct components, is proposed and the merits of this model are discussed and evaluated.

Results: The goodness of fit of the Poisson mixture model on 15 sets of biological SAGE replicates is compared to the previously proposed hierarchical gamma-Poisson (negative binomial) model, and a substantial improvement is seen. In further support of the mixture model, there is observed: 1) an increase in the number of mixture components needed to fit the expression of tags representing more than one transcript; and 2) a tendency for components to cluster libraries into the same groups. A confidence score is presented that can identify tags that are differentially expressed between groups of SAGE libraries. Several examples where this test outperforms those previously proposed are highlighted.

Conclusion: The Poisson mixture model performs well as a) a method to represent SAGE data from biological replicates, and b) a basis to assign significance when testing for differential expression between multiple groups of replicates. Code for the R statistical software package is included to assist investigators in applying this model to their own data.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Counts for two tags assessed using a Bayes error rate and the Poisson mixture model where one model shows significance and the other does not. The figure is divided to show separate plots of the expression level of two tags observed in 8 normal brain libraries and 10 ependymoma libraries. The x-axis is the normalized expression (count/library size*100,000) and the y-axis is divided into the two sample types. In the top plot, the Bayes error rate is not significant and the Poisson mixture is significant; in the bottom plot, the situation is reversed. Light gray guide lines denote the expected expression level of the Poisson components.
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Figure 5: Counts for two tags assessed using a Bayes error rate and the Poisson mixture model where one model shows significance and the other does not. The figure is divided to show separate plots of the expression level of two tags observed in 8 normal brain libraries and 10 ependymoma libraries. The x-axis is the normalized expression (count/library size*100,000) and the y-axis is divided into the two sample types. In the top plot, the Bayes error rate is not significant and the Poisson mixture is significant; in the bottom plot, the situation is reversed. Light gray guide lines denote the expected expression level of the Poisson components.

Mentions: Similar results were obtained when comparing to the Bayes error rate described in [7]. Again, a moderate correlation is seen and tags found highly significant in one test tend to be so in the other (Figure 4). Overall, the Bayes error rate is in better agreement with the mixture model confidence score and appears to be more robust in assessing tags with zero counts in one group. However, the assumption of a hierarchical model (in this case, a beta-binomial) used to calculate the Bayes error rate versus a Poisson mixture model results in differences between the two methods. Two examples, analogous to those described above, are highlighted (Figure 5). In both cases, the Poisson mixture model appears to give confidence values that are in better agreement with the observations.


Statistical analysis and significance testing of serial analysis of gene expression data using a Poisson mixture model.

Zuyderduyn SD - BMC Bioinformatics (2007)

Counts for two tags assessed using a Bayes error rate and the Poisson mixture model where one model shows significance and the other does not. The figure is divided to show separate plots of the expression level of two tags observed in 8 normal brain libraries and 10 ependymoma libraries. The x-axis is the normalized expression (count/library size*100,000) and the y-axis is divided into the two sample types. In the top plot, the Bayes error rate is not significant and the Poisson mixture is significant; in the bottom plot, the situation is reversed. Light gray guide lines denote the expected expression level of the Poisson components.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2147036&req=5

Figure 5: Counts for two tags assessed using a Bayes error rate and the Poisson mixture model where one model shows significance and the other does not. The figure is divided to show separate plots of the expression level of two tags observed in 8 normal brain libraries and 10 ependymoma libraries. The x-axis is the normalized expression (count/library size*100,000) and the y-axis is divided into the two sample types. In the top plot, the Bayes error rate is not significant and the Poisson mixture is significant; in the bottom plot, the situation is reversed. Light gray guide lines denote the expected expression level of the Poisson components.
Mentions: Similar results were obtained when comparing to the Bayes error rate described in [7]. Again, a moderate correlation is seen and tags found highly significant in one test tend to be so in the other (Figure 4). Overall, the Bayes error rate is in better agreement with the mixture model confidence score and appears to be more robust in assessing tags with zero counts in one group. However, the assumption of a hierarchical model (in this case, a beta-binomial) used to calculate the Bayes error rate versus a Poisson mixture model results in differences between the two methods. Two examples, analogous to those described above, are highlighted (Figure 5). In both cases, the Poisson mixture model appears to give confidence values that are in better agreement with the observations.

Bottom Line: Several models have been proposed to account for this effect, all of which utilize a continuous prior distribution to explain the excess variance.The goodness of fit of the Poisson mixture model on 15 sets of biological SAGE replicates is compared to the previously proposed hierarchical gamma-Poisson (negative binomial) model, and a substantial improvement is seen.Code for the R statistical software package is included to assist investigators in applying this model to their own data.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Victor Ling Laboratory, Department of Cancer Genetics and Developmental Biology, BC Cancer Research Centre, 675 West 10th Ave,, Vancouver, Canada. scottz@bccrc.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) is used to obtain quantitative snapshots of the transcriptome. These profiles are count-based and are assumed to follow a Binomial or Poisson distribution. However, tag counts observed across multiple libraries (for example, one or more groups of biological replicates) have additional variance that cannot be accommodated by this assumption alone. Several models have been proposed to account for this effect, all of which utilize a continuous prior distribution to explain the excess variance. Here, a Poisson mixture model, which assumes excess variability arises from sampling a mixture of distinct components, is proposed and the merits of this model are discussed and evaluated.

Results: The goodness of fit of the Poisson mixture model on 15 sets of biological SAGE replicates is compared to the previously proposed hierarchical gamma-Poisson (negative binomial) model, and a substantial improvement is seen. In further support of the mixture model, there is observed: 1) an increase in the number of mixture components needed to fit the expression of tags representing more than one transcript; and 2) a tendency for components to cluster libraries into the same groups. A confidence score is presented that can identify tags that are differentially expressed between groups of SAGE libraries. Several examples where this test outperforms those previously proposed are highlighted.

Conclusion: The Poisson mixture model performs well as a) a method to represent SAGE data from biological replicates, and b) a basis to assign significance when testing for differential expression between multiple groups of replicates. Code for the R statistical software package is included to assist investigators in applying this model to their own data.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus