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Thy-1 is a component common to multiple populations of synaptic vesicles.

Jeng CJ, McCarroll SA, Martin TF, Floor E, Adams J, Krantz D, Butz S, Edwards R, Schweitzer ES - J. Cell Biol. (1998)

Bottom Line: Thy-1 is also present in synaptic vesicles in rat central nervous system.Experiments on permeabilized PC12 cells demonstrate that antibodies against Thy-1 inhibit the regulated release of neurotransmitter; this inhibition appears to be independent of any effect on the Ca2+ channel.These findings suggest Thy-1 is an integral component of many types of regulated secretory vesicles, and plays an important role in the regulated vesicular release of neurotransmitter at the synapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology and Brain Research Institute, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90095-1763, USA.

ABSTRACT
Thy-1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked integral membrane protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is a component of both large dense-core and small clear vesicles in PC12 cells. A majority of this protein, formerly recognized only on the plasma membrane of neurons, is localized to regulated secretory vesicles. Thy-1 is also present in synaptic vesicles in rat central nervous system. Experiments on permeabilized PC12 cells demonstrate that antibodies against Thy-1 inhibit the regulated release of neurotransmitter; this inhibition appears to be independent of any effect on the Ca2+ channel. These findings suggest Thy-1 is an integral component of many types of regulated secretory vesicles, and plays an important role in the regulated vesicular release of neurotransmitter at the synapse.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunofluorescent localization of vesicle markers in  NGF-treated PC12 cells. NGF-treated PC12 cells were fixed, permeabilized, and labeled with 7C8 (A and B), antisecretogranin (C  and D), antisynaptophysin (E and F), or anti-SV2 (G and H) antibodies. This was followed by the addition of biotinylated sheep  anti–mouse IgG and then Texas red–streptavidin. The phase contrast images (A, C, E, and G) corresponding to the immunofluorescence images are shown to the left of each pair. Arrows indicate staining of neurite tips; arrowheads indicate perinuclear  staining. All images are printed at the same magnification; Bar,  20 μm.
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Figure 3: Immunofluorescent localization of vesicle markers in NGF-treated PC12 cells. NGF-treated PC12 cells were fixed, permeabilized, and labeled with 7C8 (A and B), antisecretogranin (C and D), antisynaptophysin (E and F), or anti-SV2 (G and H) antibodies. This was followed by the addition of biotinylated sheep anti–mouse IgG and then Texas red–streptavidin. The phase contrast images (A, C, E, and G) corresponding to the immunofluorescence images are shown to the left of each pair. Arrows indicate staining of neurite tips; arrowheads indicate perinuclear staining. All images are printed at the same magnification; Bar, 20 μm.

Mentions: A comparison of the localization of 7C8 staining within NGF-differentiated PC12 cells with that of other vesicle markers is shown in Fig. 3. Fig. 3 A shows a phase contrast image of three PC12 cells and their associated neurites, whereas Fig. 3 B shows the corresponding immunofluorescence image of these cells after staining with the 7C8 antibody. In this view, both the perinuclear cell bodies (Fig. 3 B, arrowheads) and the neurite terminals (arrows) exhibit approximately equal levels of staining with 7C8; this appearance is consistent with the staining pattern illustrated in Fig. 2 above, combined with the fact that a considerably greater volume of cytoplasm is contained in the perinuclear cell body than in the neurites.


Thy-1 is a component common to multiple populations of synaptic vesicles.

Jeng CJ, McCarroll SA, Martin TF, Floor E, Adams J, Krantz D, Butz S, Edwards R, Schweitzer ES - J. Cell Biol. (1998)

Immunofluorescent localization of vesicle markers in  NGF-treated PC12 cells. NGF-treated PC12 cells were fixed, permeabilized, and labeled with 7C8 (A and B), antisecretogranin (C  and D), antisynaptophysin (E and F), or anti-SV2 (G and H) antibodies. This was followed by the addition of biotinylated sheep  anti–mouse IgG and then Texas red–streptavidin. The phase contrast images (A, C, E, and G) corresponding to the immunofluorescence images are shown to the left of each pair. Arrows indicate staining of neurite tips; arrowheads indicate perinuclear  staining. All images are printed at the same magnification; Bar,  20 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2140167&req=5

Figure 3: Immunofluorescent localization of vesicle markers in NGF-treated PC12 cells. NGF-treated PC12 cells were fixed, permeabilized, and labeled with 7C8 (A and B), antisecretogranin (C and D), antisynaptophysin (E and F), or anti-SV2 (G and H) antibodies. This was followed by the addition of biotinylated sheep anti–mouse IgG and then Texas red–streptavidin. The phase contrast images (A, C, E, and G) corresponding to the immunofluorescence images are shown to the left of each pair. Arrows indicate staining of neurite tips; arrowheads indicate perinuclear staining. All images are printed at the same magnification; Bar, 20 μm.
Mentions: A comparison of the localization of 7C8 staining within NGF-differentiated PC12 cells with that of other vesicle markers is shown in Fig. 3. Fig. 3 A shows a phase contrast image of three PC12 cells and their associated neurites, whereas Fig. 3 B shows the corresponding immunofluorescence image of these cells after staining with the 7C8 antibody. In this view, both the perinuclear cell bodies (Fig. 3 B, arrowheads) and the neurite terminals (arrows) exhibit approximately equal levels of staining with 7C8; this appearance is consistent with the staining pattern illustrated in Fig. 2 above, combined with the fact that a considerably greater volume of cytoplasm is contained in the perinuclear cell body than in the neurites.

Bottom Line: Thy-1 is also present in synaptic vesicles in rat central nervous system.Experiments on permeabilized PC12 cells demonstrate that antibodies against Thy-1 inhibit the regulated release of neurotransmitter; this inhibition appears to be independent of any effect on the Ca2+ channel.These findings suggest Thy-1 is an integral component of many types of regulated secretory vesicles, and plays an important role in the regulated vesicular release of neurotransmitter at the synapse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology and Brain Research Institute, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90095-1763, USA.

ABSTRACT
Thy-1, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked integral membrane protein of the immunoglobulin superfamily, is a component of both large dense-core and small clear vesicles in PC12 cells. A majority of this protein, formerly recognized only on the plasma membrane of neurons, is localized to regulated secretory vesicles. Thy-1 is also present in synaptic vesicles in rat central nervous system. Experiments on permeabilized PC12 cells demonstrate that antibodies against Thy-1 inhibit the regulated release of neurotransmitter; this inhibition appears to be independent of any effect on the Ca2+ channel. These findings suggest Thy-1 is an integral component of many types of regulated secretory vesicles, and plays an important role in the regulated vesicular release of neurotransmitter at the synapse.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus