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Television viewing, computer use, obesity, and adiposity in US preschool children.

Mendoza JA, Zimmerman FJ, Christakis DA - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2007)

Bottom Line: Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos was associated with being overweight or at risk for overweight (Prevalence ratio = 1.34, 95% CI [1.07, 1.66]; n =1340) and with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 1.08, 95% CI [0.19, 1.96]; n = 1337).Computer use > 0 hours/day was associated with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.56, 95% CI [0.04, 1.07]; n = 1339).Media use had borderline significance with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.85, 95% CI [-0.04, 1.75], P=0.06; n = 1334) Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos in US preschool-age children was associated with a higher risk of being overweight or at risk for overweight and higher adiposity-findings in support of national guidelines to limit preschool children's media use.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center and Academic General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics; and the Dan L, Duncan Cancer Center; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. jason.mendoza@bcm.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited evidence in preschool children linking media use, such as television/video viewing and computer use, to obesity and adiposity. We tested three hypotheses in preschool children: 1) that watching > 2 hours of TV/videos daily is associated with obesity and adiposity, 2) that computer use is associated with obesity and adiposity, and 3) that > 2 hours of media use daily is associated with obesity and adiposity.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study using nationally representative data on children, aged 2-5 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2002. Our main outcome measures were 1) weight status: normal versus overweight or at risk for overweight, and 2) adiposity: the sum of subscapular and triceps skinfolds (mm). Our main exposures were TV/video viewing (< or = 2 or > 2 hours/day), computer use (users versus non-users), and media use (< or = 2 or > 2 hours/day). We used multivariate Poisson and linear regression analyses, adjusting for demographic covariates, to test the independent association between TV/video viewing, computer use, or overall media use and a child's weight status or adiposity.

Results: Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos was associated with being overweight or at risk for overweight (Prevalence ratio = 1.34, 95% CI [1.07, 1.66]; n =1340) and with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 1.08, 95% CI [0.19, 1.96]; n = 1337). Computer use > 0 hours/day was associated with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.56, 95% CI [0.04, 1.07]; n = 1339). Media use had borderline significance with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.85, 95% CI [-0.04, 1.75], P=0.06; n = 1334)

Conclusion: Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos in US preschool-age children was associated with a higher risk of being overweight or at risk for overweight and higher adiposity-findings in support of national guidelines to limit preschool children's media use. Computer use was also related to higher adiposity in preschool children, but not weight status. Intervention studies to limit preschool children's media use are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of US children, aged 2–5 years, by the amount of daily computer use (n = 1799).
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Figure 2: Percentage of US children, aged 2–5 years, by the amount of daily computer use (n = 1799).

Mentions: Television/video viewing was the more prevalent form of media use, compared to computer use (Figures 1 and 2). With regard to the AAP recommendations for limiting media use, 30.8% +/- 2.0% of US preschool children exceeded the guidelines by television viewing alone. Most children watched between 1–3 hours of TV/videos on the assessment day. Exceeding the AAP recommendations by television/video viewing alone was associated with higher age and poverty status (P < 0.05, Table 2). Non-Hispanic blacks and "Other" race preschoolers had the highest percentage who exceeded the recommendations when only considering television/video viewing (P < 0.05, Table 2). In contrast, most preschool children used the computer for less than 1 hour on the assessment day, or not at all (P < 0.05, Figure 3). For instance, while only 4.3% +/- 1.2% of children watched no TV/videos on the assessment day, 45.8% +/- 1.9% of children did not use a computer on the assessment day. Preschool children who were older or from families with higher incomes were more likely to have used a computer on the assessment day (P < 0.05, Table 3). Non-Hispanic black children were more likely to have used a computer than their white peers, while Mexican-American children were less likely to have used a computer on the assessment day (P < 0.05, Table 3). We found no significant differences by gender (P > 0.05, Table 3). In combining television/video viewing and computer use, we report that overall media use was prevalent among the 2–5 year old participants and approximately 36.2% +/- 1.9% exceeded the AAP recommendations with this combined exposure (Figure 3).


Television viewing, computer use, obesity, and adiposity in US preschool children.

Mendoza JA, Zimmerman FJ, Christakis DA - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act (2007)

Percentage of US children, aged 2–5 years, by the amount of daily computer use (n = 1799).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2131753&req=5

Figure 2: Percentage of US children, aged 2–5 years, by the amount of daily computer use (n = 1799).
Mentions: Television/video viewing was the more prevalent form of media use, compared to computer use (Figures 1 and 2). With regard to the AAP recommendations for limiting media use, 30.8% +/- 2.0% of US preschool children exceeded the guidelines by television viewing alone. Most children watched between 1–3 hours of TV/videos on the assessment day. Exceeding the AAP recommendations by television/video viewing alone was associated with higher age and poverty status (P < 0.05, Table 2). Non-Hispanic blacks and "Other" race preschoolers had the highest percentage who exceeded the recommendations when only considering television/video viewing (P < 0.05, Table 2). In contrast, most preschool children used the computer for less than 1 hour on the assessment day, or not at all (P < 0.05, Figure 3). For instance, while only 4.3% +/- 1.2% of children watched no TV/videos on the assessment day, 45.8% +/- 1.9% of children did not use a computer on the assessment day. Preschool children who were older or from families with higher incomes were more likely to have used a computer on the assessment day (P < 0.05, Table 3). Non-Hispanic black children were more likely to have used a computer than their white peers, while Mexican-American children were less likely to have used a computer on the assessment day (P < 0.05, Table 3). We found no significant differences by gender (P > 0.05, Table 3). In combining television/video viewing and computer use, we report that overall media use was prevalent among the 2–5 year old participants and approximately 36.2% +/- 1.9% exceeded the AAP recommendations with this combined exposure (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos was associated with being overweight or at risk for overweight (Prevalence ratio = 1.34, 95% CI [1.07, 1.66]; n =1340) and with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 1.08, 95% CI [0.19, 1.96]; n = 1337).Computer use > 0 hours/day was associated with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.56, 95% CI [0.04, 1.07]; n = 1339).Media use had borderline significance with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.85, 95% CI [-0.04, 1.75], P=0.06; n = 1334) Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos in US preschool-age children was associated with a higher risk of being overweight or at risk for overweight and higher adiposity-findings in support of national guidelines to limit preschool children's media use.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA/ARS Children's Nutrition Research Center and Academic General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics; and the Dan L, Duncan Cancer Center; Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. jason.mendoza@bcm.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited evidence in preschool children linking media use, such as television/video viewing and computer use, to obesity and adiposity. We tested three hypotheses in preschool children: 1) that watching > 2 hours of TV/videos daily is associated with obesity and adiposity, 2) that computer use is associated with obesity and adiposity, and 3) that > 2 hours of media use daily is associated with obesity and adiposity.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study using nationally representative data on children, aged 2-5 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2002. Our main outcome measures were 1) weight status: normal versus overweight or at risk for overweight, and 2) adiposity: the sum of subscapular and triceps skinfolds (mm). Our main exposures were TV/video viewing (< or = 2 or > 2 hours/day), computer use (users versus non-users), and media use (< or = 2 or > 2 hours/day). We used multivariate Poisson and linear regression analyses, adjusting for demographic covariates, to test the independent association between TV/video viewing, computer use, or overall media use and a child's weight status or adiposity.

Results: Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos was associated with being overweight or at risk for overweight (Prevalence ratio = 1.34, 95% CI [1.07, 1.66]; n =1340) and with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 1.08, 95% CI [0.19, 1.96]; n = 1337). Computer use > 0 hours/day was associated with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.56, 95% CI [0.04, 1.07]; n = 1339). Media use had borderline significance with higher skinfold thicknesses (beta = 0.85, 95% CI [-0.04, 1.75], P=0.06; n = 1334)

Conclusion: Watching > 2 hours/day of TV/videos in US preschool-age children was associated with a higher risk of being overweight or at risk for overweight and higher adiposity-findings in support of national guidelines to limit preschool children's media use. Computer use was also related to higher adiposity in preschool children, but not weight status. Intervention studies to limit preschool children's media use are warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus