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The BLISS cluster randomised controlled trial of the effect of 'active dissemination of information' on standards of care for premature babies in England (BEADI) study protocol [ISRCTN89683698].

Acolet D, Jelphs K, Davidson D, Peck E, Clemens F, Houston R, Weindling M, Lavis J, Elbourne D - Implement Sci (2007)

Bottom Line: Gaps between research knowledge and practice have been consistently reported.There is a need for clarification as to which dissemination strategies work best to translate evidence into practice in neonatal units across England.Policies and practice outcomes for the babies involved will be collected before and after the intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Statistics Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK. dominique.acolet@cemach.org.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Gaps between research knowledge and practice have been consistently reported. Traditional ways of communicating information have limited impact on practice changes. Strategies to disseminate information need to be more interactive and based on techniques reported in systematic reviews of implementation of changes. There is a need for clarification as to which dissemination strategies work best to translate evidence into practice in neonatal units across England. The objective of this trial is to assess whether an innovative active strategy for the dissemination of neonatal research findings, recommendations, and national neonatal guidelines is more likely to lead to changes in policy and practice than the traditional (more passive) forms of dissemination in England.

Methods/design: Cluster randomised controlled trial of all neonatal units in England (randomised by hospital, n = 182 and stratified by neonatal regional networks and neonatal units level of care) to assess the relative effectiveness of active dissemination strategies on changes in local policies and practices. Participants will be mainly consultant lead clinicians in each unit. The intervention will be multifaceted using: audit and feedback; educational meetings for local staff (evidence-based lectures on selected topics, interactive workshop to examine current practice and draw up plans for change); and quality improvement and organisational changes methods. Policies and practice outcomes for the babies involved will be collected before and after the intervention. Outcomes will assess all premature babies born in England during a three month period for timing of surfactant administration at birth, temperature control at birth, and resuscitation team (qualification and numbers) present at birth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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Figure 1: Flow chart of the CRCT.

Mentions: The main participants in the BLISS cluster randomised controlled trial of the Effect of 'Active Dissemination of Information' on standards of care for premature babies in England (The BEADI Study) will be clinicians from neonatal units, although data will also be collected about premature babies. All neonatal units in England (182 hospitals in England with neonatal intensive care facilities for premature babies) were identified by CEMACH at the beginning of 2006 (Fig 1). Neonatal units have been randomised to the active arm or control (Fig 1) and the randomisation process stratified by neonatal networks (n = 25) based in different health regions and by units' level of care delivered (level one to three). Some hospitals designated as level two to three or 2.5 were classified as level two. To allow randomisation to be reproduced within each strata, data were ordered by network and level of care in ascending order and then by name of hospital by alphabetic order. Data from Excel dataset was imported into statistical computer software Stata 9. Stata 9 does not directly allocate a treatment (active arm or passive) within each stratum, but generates a list of block stratified randomisation code, and within each block it allocates a treatment at random. The programme generates a series of blocks of varying size (two, four, or six) for each stratum and then allocates treatment randomly within each block. Because the number of hospitals within each block is variable, some of the treatment codes (allocation to active or passive treatment) were not used. The unused allocations within each stratum were discarded. This process was likely to generate some allocation imbalance. Among the 182 hospitals enrolled in the Epicure2 study that were randomised, 86 were allocated to the active arm and 96 to the control group (Fig 1).


The BLISS cluster randomised controlled trial of the effect of 'active dissemination of information' on standards of care for premature babies in England (BEADI) study protocol [ISRCTN89683698].

Acolet D, Jelphs K, Davidson D, Peck E, Clemens F, Houston R, Weindling M, Lavis J, Elbourne D - Implement Sci (2007)

Flow chart of the CRCT.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2117010&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart of the CRCT.
Mentions: The main participants in the BLISS cluster randomised controlled trial of the Effect of 'Active Dissemination of Information' on standards of care for premature babies in England (The BEADI Study) will be clinicians from neonatal units, although data will also be collected about premature babies. All neonatal units in England (182 hospitals in England with neonatal intensive care facilities for premature babies) were identified by CEMACH at the beginning of 2006 (Fig 1). Neonatal units have been randomised to the active arm or control (Fig 1) and the randomisation process stratified by neonatal networks (n = 25) based in different health regions and by units' level of care delivered (level one to three). Some hospitals designated as level two to three or 2.5 were classified as level two. To allow randomisation to be reproduced within each strata, data were ordered by network and level of care in ascending order and then by name of hospital by alphabetic order. Data from Excel dataset was imported into statistical computer software Stata 9. Stata 9 does not directly allocate a treatment (active arm or passive) within each stratum, but generates a list of block stratified randomisation code, and within each block it allocates a treatment at random. The programme generates a series of blocks of varying size (two, four, or six) for each stratum and then allocates treatment randomly within each block. Because the number of hospitals within each block is variable, some of the treatment codes (allocation to active or passive treatment) were not used. The unused allocations within each stratum were discarded. This process was likely to generate some allocation imbalance. Among the 182 hospitals enrolled in the Epicure2 study that were randomised, 86 were allocated to the active arm and 96 to the control group (Fig 1).

Bottom Line: Gaps between research knowledge and practice have been consistently reported.There is a need for clarification as to which dissemination strategies work best to translate evidence into practice in neonatal units across England.Policies and practice outcomes for the babies involved will be collected before and after the intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Statistics Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Keppel Street, London WC1E 7HT, UK. dominique.acolet@cemach.org.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: Gaps between research knowledge and practice have been consistently reported. Traditional ways of communicating information have limited impact on practice changes. Strategies to disseminate information need to be more interactive and based on techniques reported in systematic reviews of implementation of changes. There is a need for clarification as to which dissemination strategies work best to translate evidence into practice in neonatal units across England. The objective of this trial is to assess whether an innovative active strategy for the dissemination of neonatal research findings, recommendations, and national neonatal guidelines is more likely to lead to changes in policy and practice than the traditional (more passive) forms of dissemination in England.

Methods/design: Cluster randomised controlled trial of all neonatal units in England (randomised by hospital, n = 182 and stratified by neonatal regional networks and neonatal units level of care) to assess the relative effectiveness of active dissemination strategies on changes in local policies and practices. Participants will be mainly consultant lead clinicians in each unit. The intervention will be multifaceted using: audit and feedback; educational meetings for local staff (evidence-based lectures on selected topics, interactive workshop to examine current practice and draw up plans for change); and quality improvement and organisational changes methods. Policies and practice outcomes for the babies involved will be collected before and after the intervention. Outcomes will assess all premature babies born in England during a three month period for timing of surfactant administration at birth, temperature control at birth, and resuscitation team (qualification and numbers) present at birth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus