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Mechanism of inhibition of tumour growth by aspirin and indomethacin.

Lynch NR, Castes M, Astoin M, Salomon JC - Br. J. Cancer (1978)

Bottom Line: While the tumour contained relatively high concentrations of PGE2-like material, that were markedly diminished by indomethacin treatment, our results did not confirm the recently proposed hypothesis that the anti-tumour effect arises from a restoration of depressed immune function.Only after prolonged indomethacin treatment did animals (with comparable tumour burdens) show weak PHA responses and somewhat diminished suppressive activity.Possible alternative mechanisms, such as direct cytotoxicity, or inhibition of inflammation, phosphodiesterase activity, blood coagulation or calcium availability were not implicated (nor definitively excluded) in the anti-tumour effect.

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ABSTRACT
The growth of a 3-methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma of C3H mice was inhibited by aspirin and indomethacin. While the tumour contained relatively high concentrations of PGE2-like material, that were markedly diminished by indomethacin treatment, our results did not confirm the recently proposed hypothesis that the anti-tumour effect arises from a restoration of depressed immune function. For example, mice that had completely eliminated their tumours under indomethacin administration were not immune to rechallenge. The tumour-bearing animals were not non-specifically immunodepressed, as their splenic PFC responses against SRBC were enhanced. However, while indomethacin augmented the PFC response in normal mice, this adjuvant effect was depressed in tumour-bearing animals. The spleen-cell PHA responses of tumour bearers were severely depressed, and such cells suppressed the PHA response of normal cells. Only after prolonged indomethacin treatment did animals (with comparable tumour burdens) show weak PHA responses and somewhat diminished suppressive activity. Possible alternative mechanisms, such as direct cytotoxicity, or inhibition of inflammation, phosphodiesterase activity, blood coagulation or calcium availability were not implicated (nor definitively excluded) in the anti-tumour effect.

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Mechanism of inhibition of tumour growth by aspirin and indomethacin.

Lynch NR, Castes M, Astoin M, Salomon JC - Br. J. Cancer (1978)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2009769&req=5

Bottom Line: While the tumour contained relatively high concentrations of PGE2-like material, that were markedly diminished by indomethacin treatment, our results did not confirm the recently proposed hypothesis that the anti-tumour effect arises from a restoration of depressed immune function.Only after prolonged indomethacin treatment did animals (with comparable tumour burdens) show weak PHA responses and somewhat diminished suppressive activity.Possible alternative mechanisms, such as direct cytotoxicity, or inhibition of inflammation, phosphodiesterase activity, blood coagulation or calcium availability were not implicated (nor definitively excluded) in the anti-tumour effect.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
The growth of a 3-methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma of C3H mice was inhibited by aspirin and indomethacin. While the tumour contained relatively high concentrations of PGE2-like material, that were markedly diminished by indomethacin treatment, our results did not confirm the recently proposed hypothesis that the anti-tumour effect arises from a restoration of depressed immune function. For example, mice that had completely eliminated their tumours under indomethacin administration were not immune to rechallenge. The tumour-bearing animals were not non-specifically immunodepressed, as their splenic PFC responses against SRBC were enhanced. However, while indomethacin augmented the PFC response in normal mice, this adjuvant effect was depressed in tumour-bearing animals. The spleen-cell PHA responses of tumour bearers were severely depressed, and such cells suppressed the PHA response of normal cells. Only after prolonged indomethacin treatment did animals (with comparable tumour burdens) show weak PHA responses and somewhat diminished suppressive activity. Possible alternative mechanisms, such as direct cytotoxicity, or inhibition of inflammation, phosphodiesterase activity, blood coagulation or calcium availability were not implicated (nor definitively excluded) in the anti-tumour effect.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus