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Adult acute leukaemia.

Atkinson K, Wells DG, Clink HM, Kay HE, Powles R, McElwain TJ - Br. J. Cancer (1974)

Bottom Line: Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL).It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as "adult acute leukaemia" and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen.The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them.

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ABSTRACT
Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL). The periodic acid-Schiff stain was of little value in differentiating the 3 groups. The treatment response in each group was different: 94% of patients with ALL (16/17) achieved complete remission with prednisone, vincristine and other drugs in standard use in childhood ALL; 59% of patients with AML (27/46) achieved complete remission with cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin (22 patients), or 6-thioguanine and cyclophosphamide (2 patients), 6-thioguanine, cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin (1 patient), and cytosine and Adriamycin (1 patient); only 2 out of 14 patients (14%) with acute undifferentiated leukaemia achieved complete remission using cytosine and daunorubicin after an initial trial of prednisone and vincristine had failed. Prednisone and vincristine would seem to be of no value in acute undifferentiated leukaemia. It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as "adult acute leukaemia" and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen. The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them.

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Adult acute leukaemia.

Atkinson K, Wells DG, Clink HM, Kay HE, Powles R, McElwain TJ - Br. J. Cancer (1974)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2009210&req=5

Bottom Line: Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL).It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as "adult acute leukaemia" and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen.The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Seventy-eight adult patients with acute leukaemia were classified cytologically into 3 categories: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) or acute undifferentiated leukaemia (AUL). The periodic acid-Schiff stain was of little value in differentiating the 3 groups. The treatment response in each group was different: 94% of patients with ALL (16/17) achieved complete remission with prednisone, vincristine and other drugs in standard use in childhood ALL; 59% of patients with AML (27/46) achieved complete remission with cytosine arabinoside and daunorubicin (22 patients), or 6-thioguanine and cyclophosphamide (2 patients), 6-thioguanine, cyclophosphamide and Adriamycin (1 patient), and cytosine and Adriamycin (1 patient); only 2 out of 14 patients (14%) with acute undifferentiated leukaemia achieved complete remission using cytosine and daunorubicin after an initial trial of prednisone and vincristine had failed. Prednisone and vincristine would seem to be of no value in acute undifferentiated leukaemia. It would seem also that no benefit is obtained by classifying all patients with acute leukaemia over 20 years of age as "adult acute leukaemia" and treating them with the same polypharmaceutical regimen. The problems posed by each disease are different and such a policy serves only to obscure them.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus