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Cognitive and behavioural therapy of voices for with patients intellectual disability: two case reports.

Favrod J, Linder S, Pernier S, Chafloque MN - Ann Gen Psychiatry (2007)

Bottom Line: The traditional CBT techniques were modified to reduce the emphasis placed on cognitive abilities.Both patients improved on selected variables.They both gradually managed to reduce the power they attributed to the voice after the introduction of the therapy, and maintained their progress at follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Site de Cery, CH-1008 Prilly, Switzerland. jerome.favrod@chuv.ch

ABSTRACT

Background: Two case studies are presented to examine how cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) of auditory hallucinations can be fitted to mild and moderate intellectual disability.

Methods: A 38-year-old female patient with mild intellectual disability and a 44-year-old male patient with moderate intellectual disability, both suffering from persistent auditory hallucinations, were treated with CBT. Patients were assessed on beliefs about their voices and their inappropriate coping behaviour to them. The traditional CBT techniques were modified to reduce the emphasis placed on cognitive abilities. Verbal strategies were replaced by more concrete tasks using role-playing, figurines and touch and feel experimentation.

Results: Both patients improved on selected variables. They both gradually managed to reduce the power they attributed to the voice after the introduction of the therapy, and maintained their progress at follow-up. Their inappropriate behaviour consecutive to the belief about voices diminished in both cases.

Conclusion: These two case studies illustrate the feasibility of CBT for psychotic symptoms with intellectually disabled people, but need to be confirmed by more stringent studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results for patient 2. A, baseline; B, intervention.
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Figure 3: Results for patient 2. A, baseline; B, intervention.

Mentions: Figure 3 shows the results for patient 2. Graphs show that the patient reduced the power that he attributed to the voices as well as his level of agitation as assessed by his team. Progress was maintained at the 2-month follow-up. Contact with his sheltered workshop coach and the patient indicates that progress had been maintained at the 2-year follow-up.


Cognitive and behavioural therapy of voices for with patients intellectual disability: two case reports.

Favrod J, Linder S, Pernier S, Chafloque MN - Ann Gen Psychiatry (2007)

Results for patient 2. A, baseline; B, intervention.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1994678&req=5

Figure 3: Results for patient 2. A, baseline; B, intervention.
Mentions: Figure 3 shows the results for patient 2. Graphs show that the patient reduced the power that he attributed to the voices as well as his level of agitation as assessed by his team. Progress was maintained at the 2-month follow-up. Contact with his sheltered workshop coach and the patient indicates that progress had been maintained at the 2-year follow-up.

Bottom Line: The traditional CBT techniques were modified to reduce the emphasis placed on cognitive abilities.Both patients improved on selected variables.They both gradually managed to reduce the power they attributed to the voice after the introduction of the therapy, and maintained their progress at follow-up.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital Center and University of Lausanne, Site de Cery, CH-1008 Prilly, Switzerland. jerome.favrod@chuv.ch

ABSTRACT

Background: Two case studies are presented to examine how cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) of auditory hallucinations can be fitted to mild and moderate intellectual disability.

Methods: A 38-year-old female patient with mild intellectual disability and a 44-year-old male patient with moderate intellectual disability, both suffering from persistent auditory hallucinations, were treated with CBT. Patients were assessed on beliefs about their voices and their inappropriate coping behaviour to them. The traditional CBT techniques were modified to reduce the emphasis placed on cognitive abilities. Verbal strategies were replaced by more concrete tasks using role-playing, figurines and touch and feel experimentation.

Results: Both patients improved on selected variables. They both gradually managed to reduce the power they attributed to the voice after the introduction of the therapy, and maintained their progress at follow-up. Their inappropriate behaviour consecutive to the belief about voices diminished in both cases.

Conclusion: These two case studies illustrate the feasibility of CBT for psychotic symptoms with intellectually disabled people, but need to be confirmed by more stringent studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus