Limits...
Common HLA alleles associated with health, but not with facial attractiveness.

Coetzee V, Barrett L, Greeff JM, Henzi SP, Perrett DI, Wadee AA - PLoS ONE (2007)

Bottom Line: HLA heterozygosity did not significantly predict health measures in women, but allele frequency did.Nevertheless, neither HLA heterozygosity nor allele frequency significantly predicted how healthy or attractive men rated the female volunteers.Three non-mutually exclusive explanations are put forward to explain this finding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. vcoetzee@tuks.co.za

ABSTRACT
Three adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the link between the human leucocyte antigen (hla) genes, health measures and facial attractiveness: inbreeding avoidance, heterozygote advantage and frequency-dependent selection. This paper reports findings that support a new hypothesis relating HLA to health. We suggest a new method to quantify the level of heterozygosity. HLA heterozygosity did not significantly predict health measures in women, but allele frequency did. Women with more common HLA alleles reported fewer cold and flu bouts per year, fewer illnesses in the previous year and rated themselves healthier than women with rare alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show a positive correlation between HLA allele frequency and general health measures. We propose that certain common HLA alleles confer resistance to prevalent pathogens. Nevertheless, neither HLA heterozygosity nor allele frequency significantly predicted how healthy or attractive men rated the female volunteers. Three non-mutually exclusive explanations are put forward to explain this finding.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between combined allele frequency and the number of self reported illnesses in the previous year.Outliers are indicated as open circles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1919430&req=5

pone-0000640-g004: The relationship between combined allele frequency and the number of self reported illnesses in the previous year.Outliers are indicated as open circles.

Mentions: Combined allele frequency (averaged for HLA-A and HLA-B) significantly predicted the number of cold and flu bouts per year (equation: Cold and flu bouts = 5.536–18.743×allele frequency, F1,34 = 5.618, R2 = 0.142, p = 0.024; Figure 2), and predicted self-rated health and number of illnesses in the previous year after the removal of influential outliers (Self-rated health: equation: Self-rated health = 74.715+288.08×allele frequency, F1,37 = 6.587, R2 = 0.151, p = 0.014; Figure 3)(Number of illnesses: equation: Ill previous year = 4.089–16.245×allele frequency, F1,35 = 5.014, R2 = 0.125, p = 0.032; Figure 4), and not before (Self-rated health: F1,39 = 2.221, R2 = 0.054, p = 0.144)(Number of illnesses: F1,38 = 2.357, R2 = 0.058, p = 0.133; Table 2). However, the effect of illnesses per year was robust enough to give a marginally significant (p = 0.06) rank correlation before the removal of outliers. Interestingly, these results show that females with high combined allele frequencies (i.e., those with more common alleles) considered themselves healthier and reported fewer illnesses.


Common HLA alleles associated with health, but not with facial attractiveness.

Coetzee V, Barrett L, Greeff JM, Henzi SP, Perrett DI, Wadee AA - PLoS ONE (2007)

The relationship between combined allele frequency and the number of self reported illnesses in the previous year.Outliers are indicated as open circles.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1919430&req=5

pone-0000640-g004: The relationship between combined allele frequency and the number of self reported illnesses in the previous year.Outliers are indicated as open circles.
Mentions: Combined allele frequency (averaged for HLA-A and HLA-B) significantly predicted the number of cold and flu bouts per year (equation: Cold and flu bouts = 5.536–18.743×allele frequency, F1,34 = 5.618, R2 = 0.142, p = 0.024; Figure 2), and predicted self-rated health and number of illnesses in the previous year after the removal of influential outliers (Self-rated health: equation: Self-rated health = 74.715+288.08×allele frequency, F1,37 = 6.587, R2 = 0.151, p = 0.014; Figure 3)(Number of illnesses: equation: Ill previous year = 4.089–16.245×allele frequency, F1,35 = 5.014, R2 = 0.125, p = 0.032; Figure 4), and not before (Self-rated health: F1,39 = 2.221, R2 = 0.054, p = 0.144)(Number of illnesses: F1,38 = 2.357, R2 = 0.058, p = 0.133; Table 2). However, the effect of illnesses per year was robust enough to give a marginally significant (p = 0.06) rank correlation before the removal of outliers. Interestingly, these results show that females with high combined allele frequencies (i.e., those with more common alleles) considered themselves healthier and reported fewer illnesses.

Bottom Line: HLA heterozygosity did not significantly predict health measures in women, but allele frequency did.Nevertheless, neither HLA heterozygosity nor allele frequency significantly predicted how healthy or attractive men rated the female volunteers.Three non-mutually exclusive explanations are put forward to explain this finding.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Genetics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa. vcoetzee@tuks.co.za

ABSTRACT
Three adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the link between the human leucocyte antigen (hla) genes, health measures and facial attractiveness: inbreeding avoidance, heterozygote advantage and frequency-dependent selection. This paper reports findings that support a new hypothesis relating HLA to health. We suggest a new method to quantify the level of heterozygosity. HLA heterozygosity did not significantly predict health measures in women, but allele frequency did. Women with more common HLA alleles reported fewer cold and flu bouts per year, fewer illnesses in the previous year and rated themselves healthier than women with rare alleles. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show a positive correlation between HLA allele frequency and general health measures. We propose that certain common HLA alleles confer resistance to prevalent pathogens. Nevertheless, neither HLA heterozygosity nor allele frequency significantly predicted how healthy or attractive men rated the female volunteers. Three non-mutually exclusive explanations are put forward to explain this finding.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus