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Novel peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") with high affinity for NIR fluorochromes allows protein and cell specific labeling for in vivo imaging.

Kelly KA, Carson J, McCarthy JR, Weissleder R - PLoS ONE (2007)

Bottom Line: Here we used phage display to identify a novel peptide sequence with nanomolar affinity for near infrared (NIR) (benz)indolium fluorochromes.The developed peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") allows detection of NIR dyes in a wide range of assays including ELISA, flow cytometry, high throughput screens, microscopy, and optical in vivo imaging.The described method is expected to have broad utility in numerous applications, namely site-specific protein imaging, target identification, cell tracking, and drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Probes that allow site-specific protein labeling have become critical tools for visualizing biological processes.

Methods: Here we used phage display to identify a novel peptide sequence with nanomolar affinity for near infrared (NIR) (benz)indolium fluorochromes. The developed peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") allows detection of NIR dyes in a wide range of assays including ELISA, flow cytometry, high throughput screens, microscopy, and optical in vivo imaging.

Significance: The described method is expected to have broad utility in numerous applications, namely site-specific protein imaging, target identification, cell tracking, and drug development.

Show MeSH
Bioapplications of the IQ-tag-benzindolium fluorochrome binding pair.
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pone-0000665-g001: Bioapplications of the IQ-tag-benzindolium fluorochrome binding pair.

Mentions: In the current study we use phage display screening to determine whether peptides with sufficiently high affinity for (benz)indolium-derived fluorochromes could be identified. We found that screening a 7-mer library results in convergence onto a single peptide sequence with subnanomolar affinity for these dyes. Furthermore, the utility of the peptide for analytical testing, cell labeling, and in vivo imaging is demonstrated. The developed peptide sequence should be broadly applicable in a variety of analytical and imaging applications (Fig. 1).


Novel peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") with high affinity for NIR fluorochromes allows protein and cell specific labeling for in vivo imaging.

Kelly KA, Carson J, McCarthy JR, Weissleder R - PLoS ONE (2007)

Bioapplications of the IQ-tag-benzindolium fluorochrome binding pair.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1919420&req=5

pone-0000665-g001: Bioapplications of the IQ-tag-benzindolium fluorochrome binding pair.
Mentions: In the current study we use phage display screening to determine whether peptides with sufficiently high affinity for (benz)indolium-derived fluorochromes could be identified. We found that screening a 7-mer library results in convergence onto a single peptide sequence with subnanomolar affinity for these dyes. Furthermore, the utility of the peptide for analytical testing, cell labeling, and in vivo imaging is demonstrated. The developed peptide sequence should be broadly applicable in a variety of analytical and imaging applications (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: Here we used phage display to identify a novel peptide sequence with nanomolar affinity for near infrared (NIR) (benz)indolium fluorochromes.The developed peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") allows detection of NIR dyes in a wide range of assays including ELISA, flow cytometry, high throughput screens, microscopy, and optical in vivo imaging.The described method is expected to have broad utility in numerous applications, namely site-specific protein imaging, target identification, cell tracking, and drug development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Probes that allow site-specific protein labeling have become critical tools for visualizing biological processes.

Methods: Here we used phage display to identify a novel peptide sequence with nanomolar affinity for near infrared (NIR) (benz)indolium fluorochromes. The developed peptide sequence ("IQ-tag") allows detection of NIR dyes in a wide range of assays including ELISA, flow cytometry, high throughput screens, microscopy, and optical in vivo imaging.

Significance: The described method is expected to have broad utility in numerous applications, namely site-specific protein imaging, target identification, cell tracking, and drug development.

Show MeSH