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Primary angiosarcoma of the testis: report of a rare entity and review of the literature.

Armah HB, Rao UN, Parwani AV - Diagn Pathol (2007)

Bottom Line: None of the cases was associated with exposure to radiation, arsenic, thorium dioxide, or vinyl chloride.However, 1 case was associated with hydrocele.However, their prognosis may be better than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. armahh2@upmc.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary testicular angiosarcomas are extremely rare, and their clinicopathologic features are not well described. Our objective was to further define the clinical features and pathologic spectra of primary testicular angiosarcomas.

Methods: Six previously reported case reports were identified in the English language medical literature using MEDLINE and a subsequent bibliographic search of all pertinent reports and reviews was performed. After excluding 2 cases because they did not involve the testis, we identified 4 previously reported cases of true primary testicular angiosarcoma. We also searched the electronic medical archival records of our institution and identified one additional unreported case of true primary testicular angiosarcomas. Data were extracted on the demographics, predisposing factors, clinical presentation, gross pathology, microscopic pathology, immunophenotype, therapy, and outcomes of each of these 5 cases of true primary testicular angiosarcomas.

Results: Primary testicular angiosarcomas were found at a mean age of 43.4 years. None of the cases was associated with exposure to radiation, arsenic, thorium dioxide, or vinyl chloride. However, 1 case was associated with hydrocele. It typically presented with painless mass (mean size, 6.3 cm). Histologically, all showed classic anastomosing channels lined by plump hyperchromatic cells, though most showed epithelioid cytology and some showed solid architectural pattern. One patient had multiple metastatic recurrences but eventual outcome was not available, and 1 patient died a month after diagnosis from stroke but no autopsy was performed. The remaining 3 patients were alive at the time of publication of their respective cases (mean, 17 months).

Conclusion: Primary testicular angiosarcomas are typically rare tumors of men of all ages that appear to segregate into 2 groups; one associated with teratoma and occurring in young people, and the other occurring in the elderly and not associated with germ cell neoplasm, but may be associated with chronic hydrocele. They present with advanced disease and show a wide histologic spectrum. However, their prognosis may be better than previously thought.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Testicular tumor. A, Sectioned surface of testicular tumor shows an expansile hemorrhagic nodule displacing surrounding testicular tissue (gross). B, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of proliferation of anastomosing blood-filled channels, and focal solid pattern (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×40). C, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of anastomosing small, apparently immature vascular channels, lined by crowded plump endothelial cells, proliferating in a fibromyxoid stroma (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×200). D, Tumor cells with typical cytology of plump hyperchromatic, tufted endothelial cells with scant amphophilic cytoplasm. Note the presence of mitotic figures (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×600).
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Figure 1: Testicular tumor. A, Sectioned surface of testicular tumor shows an expansile hemorrhagic nodule displacing surrounding testicular tissue (gross). B, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of proliferation of anastomosing blood-filled channels, and focal solid pattern (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×40). C, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of anastomosing small, apparently immature vascular channels, lined by crowded plump endothelial cells, proliferating in a fibromyxoid stroma (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×200). D, Tumor cells with typical cytology of plump hyperchromatic, tufted endothelial cells with scant amphophilic cytoplasm. Note the presence of mitotic figures (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×600).

Mentions: The size of the tumors in the 5 cases of primary testicular angiosarcomas ranged from 1.7 to 10 cm in greatest dimension (mean, 6.3 cm). On gross examination, the vast majority of the testicular angiosarcomas were solid vascular lesions (Figure 1A) [80%; 4/5], while the remaining 1 presented as flesh-colored intervening stroma in a multilocular cystic mature testicular teratoma. The site most commonly involved was the testicular parenchyma in all 5 cases, followed by local invasion of the epididymis (40%; 2/5) and the spermatic cord (20%; 1/5). Gross examination of the right orchiectomy and hydrocelectomy specimen in the current case showed a 3 cm solid vascular nodule of the testicular parenchyma and epididymis, with no tumor involvement of the spermatic cord and hydrocele sac (Figure 1A).


Primary angiosarcoma of the testis: report of a rare entity and review of the literature.

Armah HB, Rao UN, Parwani AV - Diagn Pathol (2007)

Testicular tumor. A, Sectioned surface of testicular tumor shows an expansile hemorrhagic nodule displacing surrounding testicular tissue (gross). B, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of proliferation of anastomosing blood-filled channels, and focal solid pattern (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×40). C, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of anastomosing small, apparently immature vascular channels, lined by crowded plump endothelial cells, proliferating in a fibromyxoid stroma (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×200). D, Tumor cells with typical cytology of plump hyperchromatic, tufted endothelial cells with scant amphophilic cytoplasm. Note the presence of mitotic figures (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×600).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1919353&req=5

Figure 1: Testicular tumor. A, Sectioned surface of testicular tumor shows an expansile hemorrhagic nodule displacing surrounding testicular tissue (gross). B, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of proliferation of anastomosing blood-filled channels, and focal solid pattern (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×40). C, Angiosarcoma with classic architectural pattern composed of anastomosing small, apparently immature vascular channels, lined by crowded plump endothelial cells, proliferating in a fibromyxoid stroma (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×200). D, Tumor cells with typical cytology of plump hyperchromatic, tufted endothelial cells with scant amphophilic cytoplasm. Note the presence of mitotic figures (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×600).
Mentions: The size of the tumors in the 5 cases of primary testicular angiosarcomas ranged from 1.7 to 10 cm in greatest dimension (mean, 6.3 cm). On gross examination, the vast majority of the testicular angiosarcomas were solid vascular lesions (Figure 1A) [80%; 4/5], while the remaining 1 presented as flesh-colored intervening stroma in a multilocular cystic mature testicular teratoma. The site most commonly involved was the testicular parenchyma in all 5 cases, followed by local invasion of the epididymis (40%; 2/5) and the spermatic cord (20%; 1/5). Gross examination of the right orchiectomy and hydrocelectomy specimen in the current case showed a 3 cm solid vascular nodule of the testicular parenchyma and epididymis, with no tumor involvement of the spermatic cord and hydrocele sac (Figure 1A).

Bottom Line: None of the cases was associated with exposure to radiation, arsenic, thorium dioxide, or vinyl chloride.However, 1 case was associated with hydrocele.However, their prognosis may be better than previously thought.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. armahh2@upmc.edu

ABSTRACT

Background: Primary testicular angiosarcomas are extremely rare, and their clinicopathologic features are not well described. Our objective was to further define the clinical features and pathologic spectra of primary testicular angiosarcomas.

Methods: Six previously reported case reports were identified in the English language medical literature using MEDLINE and a subsequent bibliographic search of all pertinent reports and reviews was performed. After excluding 2 cases because they did not involve the testis, we identified 4 previously reported cases of true primary testicular angiosarcoma. We also searched the electronic medical archival records of our institution and identified one additional unreported case of true primary testicular angiosarcomas. Data were extracted on the demographics, predisposing factors, clinical presentation, gross pathology, microscopic pathology, immunophenotype, therapy, and outcomes of each of these 5 cases of true primary testicular angiosarcomas.

Results: Primary testicular angiosarcomas were found at a mean age of 43.4 years. None of the cases was associated with exposure to radiation, arsenic, thorium dioxide, or vinyl chloride. However, 1 case was associated with hydrocele. It typically presented with painless mass (mean size, 6.3 cm). Histologically, all showed classic anastomosing channels lined by plump hyperchromatic cells, though most showed epithelioid cytology and some showed solid architectural pattern. One patient had multiple metastatic recurrences but eventual outcome was not available, and 1 patient died a month after diagnosis from stroke but no autopsy was performed. The remaining 3 patients were alive at the time of publication of their respective cases (mean, 17 months).

Conclusion: Primary testicular angiosarcomas are typically rare tumors of men of all ages that appear to segregate into 2 groups; one associated with teratoma and occurring in young people, and the other occurring in the elderly and not associated with germ cell neoplasm, but may be associated with chronic hydrocele. They present with advanced disease and show a wide histologic spectrum. However, their prognosis may be better than previously thought.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus