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Revealing the poliovirus's path to infection.

Gross L - PLoS Biol. (2007)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

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Poliovirus consists of little more than a few genes encased in a protein coat, yet once this RNA virus enters the nervous system, it can induce paralysis within hours... Working with the poliovirus as a model for nonenveloped viruses, the researchers used fluorescence microscopy to examine not only how the virus enters the cell, but also where and when it releases its genetic material... Five minutes after infection, nearly all the virus particles, aglow with both capsid and RNA labels, stayed near the cell surface... The percentage of virus particles displaying pH sensitivity decreased over time, suggesting that the particles had entered the cell... And because the dynamics of this process mirrored those of RNA release, and no RNA was released from particles that remained on the cell surface, Brandenburg et al. concluded that RNA release happened after internalization... Genome release also depends on actin, a structural protein involved in endocytosis... Although infection does not depend on well-known components of the endocytosis pathway, it does require a class of enzymes that interact with the actin network beneath the cell membrane... The dependence of RNA release on various cellular factors determined by this imaging method correlates with the dependence obtained using an infectivity assay, demonstrating that the pathway monitored by imaging is the relevant pathway leading to infection... By testing inhibitors known to target specific enzymes, future studies can determine which one poliovirus hijacks to infect cells... Altogether, these results suggest that the poliovirus enters the cell after binding to the cell surface, then rapidly releases it genome from vesicles near the membrane... Researchers can now investigate how these vesicles trigger RNA release and how the invasive RNA reaches the cell’s replication machinery... And since nonenveloped viruses often tailor their entry mechanisms to the cell they target, the innovative imaging technique described in this study should provide researchers with a valuable tool to deconstruct, and eventually, prevent their path to infection.

No MeSH data available.


A novel imaging assay reveals how the poliovirus delivers its genome into the host cell.
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pbio-0050205-g001: A novel imaging assay reveals how the poliovirus delivers its genome into the host cell.


Revealing the poliovirus's path to infection.

Gross L - PLoS Biol. (2007)

A novel imaging assay reveals how the poliovirus delivers its genome into the host cell.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1913095&req=5

pbio-0050205-g001: A novel imaging assay reveals how the poliovirus delivers its genome into the host cell.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Poliovirus consists of little more than a few genes encased in a protein coat, yet once this RNA virus enters the nervous system, it can induce paralysis within hours... Working with the poliovirus as a model for nonenveloped viruses, the researchers used fluorescence microscopy to examine not only how the virus enters the cell, but also where and when it releases its genetic material... Five minutes after infection, nearly all the virus particles, aglow with both capsid and RNA labels, stayed near the cell surface... The percentage of virus particles displaying pH sensitivity decreased over time, suggesting that the particles had entered the cell... And because the dynamics of this process mirrored those of RNA release, and no RNA was released from particles that remained on the cell surface, Brandenburg et al. concluded that RNA release happened after internalization... Genome release also depends on actin, a structural protein involved in endocytosis... Although infection does not depend on well-known components of the endocytosis pathway, it does require a class of enzymes that interact with the actin network beneath the cell membrane... The dependence of RNA release on various cellular factors determined by this imaging method correlates with the dependence obtained using an infectivity assay, demonstrating that the pathway monitored by imaging is the relevant pathway leading to infection... By testing inhibitors known to target specific enzymes, future studies can determine which one poliovirus hijacks to infect cells... Altogether, these results suggest that the poliovirus enters the cell after binding to the cell surface, then rapidly releases it genome from vesicles near the membrane... Researchers can now investigate how these vesicles trigger RNA release and how the invasive RNA reaches the cell’s replication machinery... And since nonenveloped viruses often tailor their entry mechanisms to the cell they target, the innovative imaging technique described in this study should provide researchers with a valuable tool to deconstruct, and eventually, prevent their path to infection.

No MeSH data available.