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Urmia Lake (Northwest Iran): a brief review.

Eimanifar A, Mohebbi F - Saline Syst. (2007)

Bottom Line: Urmia Lake, located in northwestern Iran, is an oligotrophic lake of thalassohaline origin with a total surface area between 4750 and 6100 km2 and a maximum depth of 16 m at an altitude of 1250 m.The lake is divided into north and south parts separated by a causeway in which a 1500-m gap provides little exchange of water between the two parts.Due to drought and increased demands for agricultural water in the lake's basin, the salinity of the lake has risen to more than 300 g/L during recent years, and large areas of the lake bed have been desiccated.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Iranian Artemia Research Center, P.O. Box: 57135-1367, Urmia, Iran. amineimanifar@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Lake Urmia (or Ormiyeh) is one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world and the habitat of a unique bisexual Artemia species (A. urmiana). Despite this, and several other values of the lake, little literature on it has been published. The present paper is an attempt to provide a brief review on various aspects of the lake. Urmia Lake, located in northwestern Iran, is an oligotrophic lake of thalassohaline origin with a total surface area between 4750 and 6100 km2 and a maximum depth of 16 m at an altitude of 1250 m. The lake is divided into north and south parts separated by a causeway in which a 1500-m gap provides little exchange of water between the two parts. Due to drought and increased demands for agricultural water in the lake's basin, the salinity of the lake has risen to more than 300 g/L during recent years, and large areas of the lake bed have been desiccated. Therefore, management and conservation of this incomparable ecosystem should be considered to improve the current condition by fisheries research institutes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Water-level fluctuation curve for the Great Salt Lake (lower) compared with water-level information from Lake Urmia (upper data points) based partly on relative, historical observations. Note the sudden rise of 190 cm in Lake Urmia in spring 1969 resulting from the rapid surface runoff from exceptionally heavy winter snows.
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Figure 1: Water-level fluctuation curve for the Great Salt Lake (lower) compared with water-level information from Lake Urmia (upper data points) based partly on relative, historical observations. Note the sudden rise of 190 cm in Lake Urmia in spring 1969 resulting from the rapid surface runoff from exceptionally heavy winter snows.

Mentions: Morphometric characteristics of Urmia Lake are among those features that have been reported variously by different authors [12,1,17]. In general, Urmia Lake has been shrinking for a long time, so its depth has decreased significantly during recent years. Due to 10 years of progressive dry climate in the area, the water level is 3 meters less than it was 20 years ago [28], a dramatic change. Little is known about historical lake-level variations because direct measurements have been sparse. Urmia lake had an increased level (2 m) in the winter 1968/1969 but the variations reached to an amount of 1284 m in 1977, with annual fluctuations of about 1 m (Fig. 1). There is a few data to show present lake-level variations, but the lake is recovering from a different water resources resulting from favorable climatic condition in 2007. Therefore, Urmia lake level reached to an amount of 1273 m and 25 cm, which was reported by West Azarbaijan (Urmia) Environment Organization.


Urmia Lake (Northwest Iran): a brief review.

Eimanifar A, Mohebbi F - Saline Syst. (2007)

Water-level fluctuation curve for the Great Salt Lake (lower) compared with water-level information from Lake Urmia (upper data points) based partly on relative, historical observations. Note the sudden rise of 190 cm in Lake Urmia in spring 1969 resulting from the rapid surface runoff from exceptionally heavy winter snows.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1884160&req=5

Figure 1: Water-level fluctuation curve for the Great Salt Lake (lower) compared with water-level information from Lake Urmia (upper data points) based partly on relative, historical observations. Note the sudden rise of 190 cm in Lake Urmia in spring 1969 resulting from the rapid surface runoff from exceptionally heavy winter snows.
Mentions: Morphometric characteristics of Urmia Lake are among those features that have been reported variously by different authors [12,1,17]. In general, Urmia Lake has been shrinking for a long time, so its depth has decreased significantly during recent years. Due to 10 years of progressive dry climate in the area, the water level is 3 meters less than it was 20 years ago [28], a dramatic change. Little is known about historical lake-level variations because direct measurements have been sparse. Urmia lake had an increased level (2 m) in the winter 1968/1969 but the variations reached to an amount of 1284 m in 1977, with annual fluctuations of about 1 m (Fig. 1). There is a few data to show present lake-level variations, but the lake is recovering from a different water resources resulting from favorable climatic condition in 2007. Therefore, Urmia lake level reached to an amount of 1273 m and 25 cm, which was reported by West Azarbaijan (Urmia) Environment Organization.

Bottom Line: Urmia Lake, located in northwestern Iran, is an oligotrophic lake of thalassohaline origin with a total surface area between 4750 and 6100 km2 and a maximum depth of 16 m at an altitude of 1250 m.The lake is divided into north and south parts separated by a causeway in which a 1500-m gap provides little exchange of water between the two parts.Due to drought and increased demands for agricultural water in the lake's basin, the salinity of the lake has risen to more than 300 g/L during recent years, and large areas of the lake bed have been desiccated.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Iranian Artemia Research Center, P.O. Box: 57135-1367, Urmia, Iran. amineimanifar@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT
Lake Urmia (or Ormiyeh) is one of the largest hypersaline lakes in the world and the habitat of a unique bisexual Artemia species (A. urmiana). Despite this, and several other values of the lake, little literature on it has been published. The present paper is an attempt to provide a brief review on various aspects of the lake. Urmia Lake, located in northwestern Iran, is an oligotrophic lake of thalassohaline origin with a total surface area between 4750 and 6100 km2 and a maximum depth of 16 m at an altitude of 1250 m. The lake is divided into north and south parts separated by a causeway in which a 1500-m gap provides little exchange of water between the two parts. Due to drought and increased demands for agricultural water in the lake's basin, the salinity of the lake has risen to more than 300 g/L during recent years, and large areas of the lake bed have been desiccated. Therefore, management and conservation of this incomparable ecosystem should be considered to improve the current condition by fisheries research institutes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus