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Lower peripheral circulation in eumenorrheic young women with premenstrual symptoms.

Matsumoto T, Ushiroyama T, Tatsumi N - Biopsychosoc Med (2007)

Bottom Line: The oral temperature and urinary ovarian hormones adjusted for creatinine significantly increased in the late luteal phase in all subjects.We found that VOI decreased more significantly in the late luteal phase than in the follicular phase only in women with premenstrual discomfort although the symptoms were not unbearable enough to cause the disruption of daily activities.Although causes and consequences remain enigmatic, our data suggest that the peripheral circulation could alter in the luteal phase, which might be partly associated with premenstrual psychosomatic symptoms in eumenorrheic young women.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, International Buddhist University, 3-2-1 Gakuenmae, Habikino, Osaka, 583-8501, Japan. tamaki@shitennoji.ac.jp

ABSTRACT

Background: A majority of women from all cultures and socioeconomic levels experience diverse psychosomatic and behavioral symptoms premenstrually, a phenomenon commonly termed premenstrual syndrome, although symptoms and discomfort levels vary from woman to woman. The underlying pathological mechanisms of premenstrual syndrome remain unknown; however, altered function or even slight disorder of the blood circulation system, which contributes to the orchestrations of the human internal environment, could cause bio-psychological changes leading to complaints and ultimately compromising a woman's overall health. The present study, therefore, investigates to what extent and how the menstrual cyclicity of peripheral circulation is associated with premenstrual symptomatology.

Methods: Twenty-one eumenorrheic young women participated in this study. All subjects were investigated during the follicular and late luteal phases. Cycle phase was determined by the onset of menstruation and oral temperature and was verified by concentrations of ovarian hormones, estrone, and pregnanediol in a urine sample taken early in the morning. Peripheral circulation was evaluated with the Astrim (Sysmex, Kobe), a portable non-invasive monitoring device using the principle of near-infrared spectroscopy, which calculates the venous oxygenation index (VOI) based on the ratio of light absorption of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, a proven reliable indicator of peripheral blood circulation. The Menstrual Distress Questionnaire was applied to measure physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms accompanying the menstrual cycle of the subjects.

Results: The oral temperature and urinary ovarian hormones adjusted for creatinine significantly increased in the late luteal phase in all subjects. While 10 subjects experienced no symptoms during the menstrual cycle, 11 subjects had apparent physical and psychological discomfort in the late luteal phase. We found that VOI decreased more significantly in the late luteal phase than in the follicular phase only in women with premenstrual discomfort although the symptoms were not unbearable enough to cause the disruption of daily activities.

Conclusion: Several models have tried to explain the etiopathogenesis of premenstrual syndrome. Although causes and consequences remain enigmatic, our data suggest that the peripheral circulation could alter in the luteal phase, which might be partly associated with premenstrual psychosomatic symptoms in eumenorrheic young women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of scores on the menstrual distress questionnaire (MDQ) between the follicular and late luteal phases in the Control and PMS Groups. Results are expressed as mean ± SE. for each group. ** p < 0.01; * p < 0.05.
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Figure 4: Comparison of scores on the menstrual distress questionnaire (MDQ) between the follicular and late luteal phases in the Control and PMS Groups. Results are expressed as mean ± SE. for each group. ** p < 0.01; * p < 0.05.

Mentions: Figure 4 represents MDQ scores in the follicular and the late luteal phases in the Control and PMS Groups. No significant increase was detected either in subscores or in total scores between the menstrual phases in the Control Group. In the PMS Group, however, total scores markedly increased from the follicular to the late luteal phase (p < 0.01). Scores of all factors were greater in the late luteal phase than those in the follicular phase and significant changes were detected in the following factors: pain (p < 0.05), concentration (p < 0.01), behavioral change (p < 0.05), water retention (p < 0.05), negative affect (p < 0.01), and control (p < 0.01).


Lower peripheral circulation in eumenorrheic young women with premenstrual symptoms.

Matsumoto T, Ushiroyama T, Tatsumi N - Biopsychosoc Med (2007)

Comparison of scores on the menstrual distress questionnaire (MDQ) between the follicular and late luteal phases in the Control and PMS Groups. Results are expressed as mean ± SE. for each group. ** p < 0.01; * p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1851706&req=5

Figure 4: Comparison of scores on the menstrual distress questionnaire (MDQ) between the follicular and late luteal phases in the Control and PMS Groups. Results are expressed as mean ± SE. for each group. ** p < 0.01; * p < 0.05.
Mentions: Figure 4 represents MDQ scores in the follicular and the late luteal phases in the Control and PMS Groups. No significant increase was detected either in subscores or in total scores between the menstrual phases in the Control Group. In the PMS Group, however, total scores markedly increased from the follicular to the late luteal phase (p < 0.01). Scores of all factors were greater in the late luteal phase than those in the follicular phase and significant changes were detected in the following factors: pain (p < 0.05), concentration (p < 0.01), behavioral change (p < 0.05), water retention (p < 0.05), negative affect (p < 0.01), and control (p < 0.01).

Bottom Line: The oral temperature and urinary ovarian hormones adjusted for creatinine significantly increased in the late luteal phase in all subjects.We found that VOI decreased more significantly in the late luteal phase than in the follicular phase only in women with premenstrual discomfort although the symptoms were not unbearable enough to cause the disruption of daily activities.Although causes and consequences remain enigmatic, our data suggest that the peripheral circulation could alter in the luteal phase, which might be partly associated with premenstrual psychosomatic symptoms in eumenorrheic young women.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Science, International Buddhist University, 3-2-1 Gakuenmae, Habikino, Osaka, 583-8501, Japan. tamaki@shitennoji.ac.jp

ABSTRACT

Background: A majority of women from all cultures and socioeconomic levels experience diverse psychosomatic and behavioral symptoms premenstrually, a phenomenon commonly termed premenstrual syndrome, although symptoms and discomfort levels vary from woman to woman. The underlying pathological mechanisms of premenstrual syndrome remain unknown; however, altered function or even slight disorder of the blood circulation system, which contributes to the orchestrations of the human internal environment, could cause bio-psychological changes leading to complaints and ultimately compromising a woman's overall health. The present study, therefore, investigates to what extent and how the menstrual cyclicity of peripheral circulation is associated with premenstrual symptomatology.

Methods: Twenty-one eumenorrheic young women participated in this study. All subjects were investigated during the follicular and late luteal phases. Cycle phase was determined by the onset of menstruation and oral temperature and was verified by concentrations of ovarian hormones, estrone, and pregnanediol in a urine sample taken early in the morning. Peripheral circulation was evaluated with the Astrim (Sysmex, Kobe), a portable non-invasive monitoring device using the principle of near-infrared spectroscopy, which calculates the venous oxygenation index (VOI) based on the ratio of light absorption of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin, a proven reliable indicator of peripheral blood circulation. The Menstrual Distress Questionnaire was applied to measure physical, emotional, and behavioral symptoms accompanying the menstrual cycle of the subjects.

Results: The oral temperature and urinary ovarian hormones adjusted for creatinine significantly increased in the late luteal phase in all subjects. While 10 subjects experienced no symptoms during the menstrual cycle, 11 subjects had apparent physical and psychological discomfort in the late luteal phase. We found that VOI decreased more significantly in the late luteal phase than in the follicular phase only in women with premenstrual discomfort although the symptoms were not unbearable enough to cause the disruption of daily activities.

Conclusion: Several models have tried to explain the etiopathogenesis of premenstrual syndrome. Although causes and consequences remain enigmatic, our data suggest that the peripheral circulation could alter in the luteal phase, which might be partly associated with premenstrual psychosomatic symptoms in eumenorrheic young women.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus