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Daily and estrous rhythmicity of body temperature in domestic cattle.

Piccione G, Caola G, Refinetti R - BMC Physiol. (2003)

Bottom Line: The mature rhythm had a mean level of 38.3 degrees C, a range of excursion of 1.4 degrees C, and was more robust than that of any mammalian species previously studied (90% of maximal robustness).An elevation of about 1.3 degrees C was observed every 21 days on the day of estrus.Small seasonal variations in this pattern were observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Morfologia, Biochimica, Fisiologia e Produzioni Animali, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy. giuseppepiccione1@virgilio.it

ABSTRACT

Background: Rhythmicity in core body temperature has been extensively studied in humans and laboratory animals but much less in farm animals. Extending the study of rhythmicity of body temperature to farm animals is important not only from a comparative perspective but also from an economic perspective, as greater knowledge of this process can lead to improvements in livestock production practices. In this study in cattle, we investigated the maturation of the daily rhythm of body temperature in newborn calves, characterized the parameters of the daily rhythm in young cows, and studied the oscillation in body temperature associated with the estrous cycle in adult cows.

Results: We found that the daily rhythm of body temperature is absent at birth but matures fully during the first two months of life. The mature rhythm had a mean level of 38.3 degrees C, a range of excursion of 1.4 degrees C, and was more robust than that of any mammalian species previously studied (90% of maximal robustness). Sexually mature cows also exhibited a robust estrous rhythm of body temperature. An elevation of about 1.3 degrees C was observed every 21 days on the day of estrus. Small seasonal variations in this pattern were observed.

Conclusion: In conclusion, calves exhibit a very robust daily rhythm of body temperature, although this rhythm is absent at birth and develops during the first two months of life. Adult cows exhibit also 21-day rhythmicity in body temperature reflecting the duration of the estrous cycle.

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Mean body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 hours. Values shown are means ± SEM of the body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 h during the first 10 days of life (top) and during days 52 through 61 (bottom). The white and dark bars at the top of each panel indicate the duration of the light and dark phases of the light-dark cycle, respectively.
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Figure 2: Mean body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 hours. Values shown are means ± SEM of the body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 h during the first 10 days of life (top) and during days 52 through 61 (bottom). The white and dark bars at the top of each panel indicate the duration of the light and dark phases of the light-dark cycle, respectively.

Mentions: Greater temporal resolution of the oscillation in body temperature is provided in Fig. 2 for the first and last 10 days of the study. There was no daily rhythmicity during the first 8 days. A daily oscillation of about 0.5°C could be observed starting on the 9th day. By day 52, a regular pattern of daily oscillation had been established with a range of excursion greater than 1°C. Body temperature consistently rose during the day, reaching a peak at sunset, and fell throughout the night. The smooth rhythms give no indication that the body temperature rhythm could have been a collateral effect of the feeding schedule (food was provided 2.5, 7.5, and 12.5 h after sunrise daily). The daily rise in body temperature did not seem to anticipate (precede) the dark-to-light transition, although the 3-h resolution of our measurements would not allow the detection of anticipation by 1 or 2 h.


Daily and estrous rhythmicity of body temperature in domestic cattle.

Piccione G, Caola G, Refinetti R - BMC Physiol. (2003)

Mean body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 hours. Values shown are means ± SEM of the body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 h during the first 10 days of life (top) and during days 52 through 61 (bottom). The white and dark bars at the top of each panel indicate the duration of the light and dark phases of the light-dark cycle, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC184454&req=5

Figure 2: Mean body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 hours. Values shown are means ± SEM of the body temperature of 8 calves measured every 3 h during the first 10 days of life (top) and during days 52 through 61 (bottom). The white and dark bars at the top of each panel indicate the duration of the light and dark phases of the light-dark cycle, respectively.
Mentions: Greater temporal resolution of the oscillation in body temperature is provided in Fig. 2 for the first and last 10 days of the study. There was no daily rhythmicity during the first 8 days. A daily oscillation of about 0.5°C could be observed starting on the 9th day. By day 52, a regular pattern of daily oscillation had been established with a range of excursion greater than 1°C. Body temperature consistently rose during the day, reaching a peak at sunset, and fell throughout the night. The smooth rhythms give no indication that the body temperature rhythm could have been a collateral effect of the feeding schedule (food was provided 2.5, 7.5, and 12.5 h after sunrise daily). The daily rise in body temperature did not seem to anticipate (precede) the dark-to-light transition, although the 3-h resolution of our measurements would not allow the detection of anticipation by 1 or 2 h.

Bottom Line: The mature rhythm had a mean level of 38.3 degrees C, a range of excursion of 1.4 degrees C, and was more robust than that of any mammalian species previously studied (90% of maximal robustness).An elevation of about 1.3 degrees C was observed every 21 days on the day of estrus.Small seasonal variations in this pattern were observed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Morfologia, Biochimica, Fisiologia e Produzioni Animali, Facoltà di Medicina Veterinaria, Università degli Studi di Messina, 98168 Messina, Italy. giuseppepiccione1@virgilio.it

ABSTRACT

Background: Rhythmicity in core body temperature has been extensively studied in humans and laboratory animals but much less in farm animals. Extending the study of rhythmicity of body temperature to farm animals is important not only from a comparative perspective but also from an economic perspective, as greater knowledge of this process can lead to improvements in livestock production practices. In this study in cattle, we investigated the maturation of the daily rhythm of body temperature in newborn calves, characterized the parameters of the daily rhythm in young cows, and studied the oscillation in body temperature associated with the estrous cycle in adult cows.

Results: We found that the daily rhythm of body temperature is absent at birth but matures fully during the first two months of life. The mature rhythm had a mean level of 38.3 degrees C, a range of excursion of 1.4 degrees C, and was more robust than that of any mammalian species previously studied (90% of maximal robustness). Sexually mature cows also exhibited a robust estrous rhythm of body temperature. An elevation of about 1.3 degrees C was observed every 21 days on the day of estrus. Small seasonal variations in this pattern were observed.

Conclusion: In conclusion, calves exhibit a very robust daily rhythm of body temperature, although this rhythm is absent at birth and develops during the first two months of life. Adult cows exhibit also 21-day rhythmicity in body temperature reflecting the duration of the estrous cycle.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus