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Metastatic sweat gland adenocarcinoma: A clinico-pathological dilemma.

- World J Surg Oncol (2003)

Bottom Line: Liver, lung and bones are the distant sites of metastasis with fatal results.Surgery in the form of wide local excision and lymph node dissection is the mainstay of treatment.Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy has limited role.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjang Hospital, New Delhi 110023 India. chintamani7@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Sweat gland adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy with high metastatic potential seen more commonly in later years of life. Scalp is the most common site of occurrence and it usually spreads to lymph nodes. Liver, lung and bones are the distant sites of metastasis with fatal results. The differentiation between apocrine and eccrine metastatic sweat gland carcinoma is often difficult. The criteria's are inadequate to be of any practical utility. CASE REPORT: Two cases of metastatic sweat gland adenocarcinoma (one of eccrine and the other one of apocrine origin) are being reported on account of the rarity and different outcome. CONCLUSION: Sweat gland carcinomas are rare cancers with a poor prognosis often presenting as histological surprises. Surgery in the form of wide local excision and lymph node dissection is the mainstay of treatment. Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy has limited role.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical photograph showing right axillary fullness and skin nodule
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Figure 1: Clinical photograph showing right axillary fullness and skin nodule

Mentions: A 45-year-old man presented to the surgical wing with swelling in the right axilla of 2 months duration. There was a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, two years back, for which patient had taken anti tubercular treatment. On examination the thyroid, breasts, chest, abdomen, and per rectal examinations were normal. Examination of axilla revealed a tiny, indurated, non tender, pink skin nodule of about 5 mm diameter (figure 1) with multiple, firm, non tender, discrete, axillary lymph nodes measuring 1 to 4 cm.


Metastatic sweat gland adenocarcinoma: A clinico-pathological dilemma.

- World J Surg Oncol (2003)

Clinical photograph showing right axillary fullness and skin nodule
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC184447&req=5

Figure 1: Clinical photograph showing right axillary fullness and skin nodule
Mentions: A 45-year-old man presented to the surgical wing with swelling in the right axilla of 2 months duration. There was a past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, two years back, for which patient had taken anti tubercular treatment. On examination the thyroid, breasts, chest, abdomen, and per rectal examinations were normal. Examination of axilla revealed a tiny, indurated, non tender, pink skin nodule of about 5 mm diameter (figure 1) with multiple, firm, non tender, discrete, axillary lymph nodes measuring 1 to 4 cm.

Bottom Line: Liver, lung and bones are the distant sites of metastasis with fatal results.Surgery in the form of wide local excision and lymph node dissection is the mainstay of treatment.Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy has limited role.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College & Safdarjang Hospital, New Delhi 110023 India. chintamani7@rediffmail.com

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: Sweat gland adenocarcinoma is a rare malignancy with high metastatic potential seen more commonly in later years of life. Scalp is the most common site of occurrence and it usually spreads to lymph nodes. Liver, lung and bones are the distant sites of metastasis with fatal results. The differentiation between apocrine and eccrine metastatic sweat gland carcinoma is often difficult. The criteria's are inadequate to be of any practical utility. CASE REPORT: Two cases of metastatic sweat gland adenocarcinoma (one of eccrine and the other one of apocrine origin) are being reported on account of the rarity and different outcome. CONCLUSION: Sweat gland carcinomas are rare cancers with a poor prognosis often presenting as histological surprises. Surgery in the form of wide local excision and lymph node dissection is the mainstay of treatment. Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy has limited role.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus