Limits...
Risk of contamination of nasal sprays in otolaryngologic practice.

Aydin E, Hizal E, Akkuzu B, Azap O - BMC Ear Nose Throat Disord (2007)

Bottom Line: The aim of our study was to determine, by means of microbiologic analysis, the safety of a positive-displacement or pump-type atomizer after multiple uses.Although there was no statistically significant difference in positive culture rates among the types of nasal spray bottles tested, methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated in 4 of 198 cultures.Given these findings, we concluded that additional precautions (such as the use of an autoclave between sprays, disposable tips, or disposable devices) are warranted to avoid interpatient cross-contamination from a reusable nasal spray device.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. erdinca@baskent-ank.edu.tr

ABSTRACT

Background: Reusable nasal-spray devices are frequently used in otolaryngologic examinations, and there is an increasing concern about the risk of cross-contamination from these devices. The aim of our study was to determine, by means of microbiologic analysis, the safety of a positive-displacement or pump-type atomizer after multiple uses.

Methods: A reusable nasal spray bottle, pump, and tips were used in the nasal physical examination of 282 patients admitted to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic. The effectiveness of 2 different methods of prophylaxis against microbiologic contamination (the use of protective punched caps or rinsing the bottle tip with alcohol) was compared with that of a control procedure.

Results: Although there was no statistically significant difference in positive culture rates among the types of nasal spray bottles tested, methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated in 4 of 198 cultures.

Conclusion: Given these findings, we concluded that additional precautions (such as the use of an autoclave between sprays, disposable tips, or disposable devices) are warranted to avoid interpatient cross-contamination from a reusable nasal spray device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A) A spray bottle with its cap off (group 1). B) A spray bottle with its punched cap on (group 2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1828065&req=5

Figure 1: A) A spray bottle with its cap off (group 1). B) A spray bottle with its punched cap on (group 2).

Mentions: The medication contained in the spray bottles was a combination of 0.05% oxymetazoline hydrochloride (a vasoconstrictive agent) and 0.01% benzalkonium chloride (a preservative) (Iliadin; Merck Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey). The spray bottles were used in 2 different ways. Cap-off bottles (Figure 1) were rinsed with 70% ethyl alcohol solution after each use; cap-on bottles (Figure 1) received a new clean, cap (punched to provide a hole of sufficient size) for each patient.


Risk of contamination of nasal sprays in otolaryngologic practice.

Aydin E, Hizal E, Akkuzu B, Azap O - BMC Ear Nose Throat Disord (2007)

A) A spray bottle with its cap off (group 1). B) A spray bottle with its punched cap on (group 2).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1828065&req=5

Figure 1: A) A spray bottle with its cap off (group 1). B) A spray bottle with its punched cap on (group 2).
Mentions: The medication contained in the spray bottles was a combination of 0.05% oxymetazoline hydrochloride (a vasoconstrictive agent) and 0.01% benzalkonium chloride (a preservative) (Iliadin; Merck Ltd, Istanbul, Turkey). The spray bottles were used in 2 different ways. Cap-off bottles (Figure 1) were rinsed with 70% ethyl alcohol solution after each use; cap-on bottles (Figure 1) received a new clean, cap (punched to provide a hole of sufficient size) for each patient.

Bottom Line: The aim of our study was to determine, by means of microbiologic analysis, the safety of a positive-displacement or pump-type atomizer after multiple uses.Although there was no statistically significant difference in positive culture rates among the types of nasal spray bottles tested, methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated in 4 of 198 cultures.Given these findings, we concluded that additional precautions (such as the use of an autoclave between sprays, disposable tips, or disposable devices) are warranted to avoid interpatient cross-contamination from a reusable nasal spray device.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. erdinca@baskent-ank.edu.tr

ABSTRACT

Background: Reusable nasal-spray devices are frequently used in otolaryngologic examinations, and there is an increasing concern about the risk of cross-contamination from these devices. The aim of our study was to determine, by means of microbiologic analysis, the safety of a positive-displacement or pump-type atomizer after multiple uses.

Methods: A reusable nasal spray bottle, pump, and tips were used in the nasal physical examination of 282 patients admitted to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic. The effectiveness of 2 different methods of prophylaxis against microbiologic contamination (the use of protective punched caps or rinsing the bottle tip with alcohol) was compared with that of a control procedure.

Results: Although there was no statistically significant difference in positive culture rates among the types of nasal spray bottles tested, methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated in 4 of 198 cultures.

Conclusion: Given these findings, we concluded that additional precautions (such as the use of an autoclave between sprays, disposable tips, or disposable devices) are warranted to avoid interpatient cross-contamination from a reusable nasal spray device.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus