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Undertaking research in other countries: national ethico-legal barometers and international ethical consensus statements.

Skene L - PLoS Med. (2007)

Bottom Line: Is it ethical for scientists to conduct or to benefit from research in another country if that research would be unlawful, or not generally accepted, in their own country?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. l.skene@unimelb.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Is it ethical for scientists to conduct or to benefit from research in another country if that research would be unlawful, or not generally accepted, in their own country?

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Each country's laws generally apply only within its boundaries; laws with extraterritorial effect are enacted only when an activity is widely condemned (e.g., paedophilia)
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pmed-0040010-g001: Each country's laws generally apply only within its boundaries; laws with extraterritorial effect are enacted only when an activity is widely condemned (e.g., paedophilia)

Mentions: My central argument is that when research done overseas falls above a certain level on a country's “ethico-legal barometer” (see Figure 1), it should be assumed that there is not such a high level of ethical objection within the country as to make its ethical standards significantly different from those reflected in the international consensus statement. However, when the proposed research falls in the red zone of the barometer (very widely condemned; laws with extraterritorial application), compliance with the consensus statement would not reassure people in the home country. Such “red zone” research done overseas may be regarded as unethical and should be prohibited. If scientists in the home country seem inclined to do “red zone” research in other countries, the home country can enact extraterritorial laws to prevent them doing so.


Undertaking research in other countries: national ethico-legal barometers and international ethical consensus statements.

Skene L - PLoS Med. (2007)

Each country's laws generally apply only within its boundaries; laws with extraterritorial effect are enacted only when an activity is widely condemned (e.g., paedophilia)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1808077&req=5

pmed-0040010-g001: Each country's laws generally apply only within its boundaries; laws with extraterritorial effect are enacted only when an activity is widely condemned (e.g., paedophilia)
Mentions: My central argument is that when research done overseas falls above a certain level on a country's “ethico-legal barometer” (see Figure 1), it should be assumed that there is not such a high level of ethical objection within the country as to make its ethical standards significantly different from those reflected in the international consensus statement. However, when the proposed research falls in the red zone of the barometer (very widely condemned; laws with extraterritorial application), compliance with the consensus statement would not reassure people in the home country. Such “red zone” research done overseas may be regarded as unethical and should be prohibited. If scientists in the home country seem inclined to do “red zone” research in other countries, the home country can enact extraterritorial laws to prevent them doing so.

Bottom Line: Is it ethical for scientists to conduct or to benefit from research in another country if that research would be unlawful, or not generally accepted, in their own country?

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. l.skene@unimelb.edu.au

ABSTRACT
Is it ethical for scientists to conduct or to benefit from research in another country if that research would be unlawful, or not generally accepted, in their own country?

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus