Limits...
Population distribution and burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in British Columbia, Canada.

Thomas MK, Majowicz SE, MacDougall L, Sockett PN, Kovacs SJ, Fyfe M, Edge VL, Doré K, Flint JA, Henson S, Jones AQ - BMC Public Health (2006)

Bottom Line: Respondents were asked if they had experienced vomiting or diarrhoea in the 28 days prior to the interview.A response rate of 44.3% was achieved.The results corroborate those from previous Canadian and international studies, highlighting the substantial burden of acute GI.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph and Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Kate_Thomas@phac-aspc.gc.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: In developed countries, gastrointestinal illness (GI) is typically mild and self-limiting, however, it has considerable economic impact due to high morbidity.

Methods: The magnitude and distribution of acute GI in British Columbia (BC), Canada was evaluated via a cross-sectional telephone survey of 4,612 randomly selected residents, conducted from June 2002 to June 2003. Respondents were asked if they had experienced vomiting or diarrhoea in the 28 days prior to the interview.

Results: A response rate of 44.3% was achieved. A monthly prevalence of 9.2% (95% CI 8.4-10.0), an incidence rate of 1.3 (95% CI 1.1-1.4) episodes of acute GI per person-year, and an average probability that an individual developed illness in the year of 71.6% (95% CI 68.0-74.8), weighted by population size were observed. The average duration of illness was 3.7 days, translating into 19.2 million days annually of acute GI in BC.

Conclusion: The results corroborate those from previous Canadian and international studies, highlighting the substantial burden of acute GI.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Three-month moving average of monthly prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness by study month and age group (in years), in the province of British Columbia, Canada.
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Figure 5: Three-month moving average of monthly prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness by study month and age group (in years), in the province of British Columbia, Canada.

Mentions: Illness was significantly associated with level of education (p = 0.008), number of people in household (p < 0.001), age group (p < 0.001) and gender (p = 0.018), but not with total household income (p = 0.271) or cultural group (p = 0.125). There was variation in the prevalence of GI throughout the year, peaking in August (13.3%) and December (12.9%; Figure 4). Figure 5 illustrates the temporal distribution of GI cases by age group. No real seasonal pattern in the prevalence of GI was observed in those 25 years of age and older, however the prevalence in those 10–24 years of age peaked in July and December. The prevalence in those 0–9 years of age followed a different temporal pattern, with a 'peak' in the fall (September, October, November) and a second peak in the spring (March).


Population distribution and burden of acute gastrointestinal illness in British Columbia, Canada.

Thomas MK, Majowicz SE, MacDougall L, Sockett PN, Kovacs SJ, Fyfe M, Edge VL, Doré K, Flint JA, Henson S, Jones AQ - BMC Public Health (2006)

Three-month moving average of monthly prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness by study month and age group (in years), in the province of British Columbia, Canada.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1764889&req=5

Figure 5: Three-month moving average of monthly prevalence of acute gastrointestinal illness by study month and age group (in years), in the province of British Columbia, Canada.
Mentions: Illness was significantly associated with level of education (p = 0.008), number of people in household (p < 0.001), age group (p < 0.001) and gender (p = 0.018), but not with total household income (p = 0.271) or cultural group (p = 0.125). There was variation in the prevalence of GI throughout the year, peaking in August (13.3%) and December (12.9%; Figure 4). Figure 5 illustrates the temporal distribution of GI cases by age group. No real seasonal pattern in the prevalence of GI was observed in those 25 years of age and older, however the prevalence in those 10–24 years of age peaked in July and December. The prevalence in those 0–9 years of age followed a different temporal pattern, with a 'peak' in the fall (September, October, November) and a second peak in the spring (March).

Bottom Line: Respondents were asked if they had experienced vomiting or diarrhoea in the 28 days prior to the interview.A response rate of 44.3% was achieved.The results corroborate those from previous Canadian and international studies, highlighting the substantial burden of acute GI.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Foodborne, Waterborne and Zoonotic Infections Division, Public Health Agency of Canada, Guelph and Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Kate_Thomas@phac-aspc.gc.ca

ABSTRACT

Background: In developed countries, gastrointestinal illness (GI) is typically mild and self-limiting, however, it has considerable economic impact due to high morbidity.

Methods: The magnitude and distribution of acute GI in British Columbia (BC), Canada was evaluated via a cross-sectional telephone survey of 4,612 randomly selected residents, conducted from June 2002 to June 2003. Respondents were asked if they had experienced vomiting or diarrhoea in the 28 days prior to the interview.

Results: A response rate of 44.3% was achieved. A monthly prevalence of 9.2% (95% CI 8.4-10.0), an incidence rate of 1.3 (95% CI 1.1-1.4) episodes of acute GI per person-year, and an average probability that an individual developed illness in the year of 71.6% (95% CI 68.0-74.8), weighted by population size were observed. The average duration of illness was 3.7 days, translating into 19.2 million days annually of acute GI in BC.

Conclusion: The results corroborate those from previous Canadian and international studies, highlighting the substantial burden of acute GI.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus