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A highly pathogenic strain of Staphylococcus sciuri caused fatal exudative epidermitis in piglets.

Chen S, Wang Y, Chen F, Yang H, Gan M, Zheng SJ - PLoS ONE (2007)

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, this isolate was a member of S. sciuri rather than S. hyicus as identified by its biochemical traits and also by analysis of 23S ribosomal DNA using Internal Transcribed Spacer PCR.In addition, inoculation of newborn piglets with 1x10(10) CFU of the isolate by oral feeding or intra-muscular injection successfully reproduced EE in piglets, which suggested that the oral intake of the pathogen by the animals is one of the major routes of exposure.These unexpected findings prioritized S. sciuri as important zoonotic agents, which may have ramifications for human medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Staphylococcus sciuri are important human pathogens responsible for endocarditis, peritonitis, septic shock, urinary tract infection, pelvic inflammatory disease and wound infections. However, little information is known regarding the pathogenicity of S. sciuri to animals. From the pericardial fluid of a diseased piglet with exudative epidermitis (EE), we isolated a strain of Staphylococcus in pure culture. Surprisingly, this isolate was a member of S. sciuri rather than S. hyicus as identified by its biochemical traits and also by analysis of 23S ribosomal DNA using Internal Transcribed Spacer PCR. In addition, inoculation of newborn piglets with 1x10(10) CFU of the isolate by oral feeding or intra-muscular injection successfully reproduced EE in piglets, which suggested that the oral intake of the pathogen by the animals is one of the major routes of exposure. These unexpected findings prioritized S. sciuri as important zoonotic agents, which may have ramifications for human medicine.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical case of Exudative Epidermitis (EE) in piglets.A–B. Skin lesions (indicated by arrows) of five-day-old piglets with EE. C. Morbidity and mortality of suckling piglets from September of 2005 (n = 23), December of 2005 (n = 33) through March of 2006 (n = 95).
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pone-0000147-g001: Clinical case of Exudative Epidermitis (EE) in piglets.A–B. Skin lesions (indicated by arrows) of five-day-old piglets with EE. C. Morbidity and mortality of suckling piglets from September of 2005 (n = 23), December of 2005 (n = 33) through March of 2006 (n = 95).

Mentions: Exudative epidermitis occurred in the suckling piglets on a conventional pig farm with 172 sows in Hebei province in the fall of 2005 through May of 2006. The diseased piglets, which were born healthy, began to show clinical signs as early as 1 days following birth, displaying skin reddening, exfoliation, exudation and crusting, and succumbed to death within 2–4 days. The survivals were covered with brownish greasy layers (Figure 1A and 1B). As shown in Figure 1C, the mortality was 13% (3/23) in the beginning of the outbreak and reached up to 84% (80/95) within 6 months while the morbidity began with 33% (1/3) and reached up to 68% (54/80) in the spring of 2006. The nursing sow of diseased piglets manifested no other clinical signs than localized transient rashes or slight EE on the abdomen skin but recovered in a few days.


A highly pathogenic strain of Staphylococcus sciuri caused fatal exudative epidermitis in piglets.

Chen S, Wang Y, Chen F, Yang H, Gan M, Zheng SJ - PLoS ONE (2007)

Clinical case of Exudative Epidermitis (EE) in piglets.A–B. Skin lesions (indicated by arrows) of five-day-old piglets with EE. C. Morbidity and mortality of suckling piglets from September of 2005 (n = 23), December of 2005 (n = 33) through March of 2006 (n = 95).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1764720&req=5

pone-0000147-g001: Clinical case of Exudative Epidermitis (EE) in piglets.A–B. Skin lesions (indicated by arrows) of five-day-old piglets with EE. C. Morbidity and mortality of suckling piglets from September of 2005 (n = 23), December of 2005 (n = 33) through March of 2006 (n = 95).
Mentions: Exudative epidermitis occurred in the suckling piglets on a conventional pig farm with 172 sows in Hebei province in the fall of 2005 through May of 2006. The diseased piglets, which were born healthy, began to show clinical signs as early as 1 days following birth, displaying skin reddening, exfoliation, exudation and crusting, and succumbed to death within 2–4 days. The survivals were covered with brownish greasy layers (Figure 1A and 1B). As shown in Figure 1C, the mortality was 13% (3/23) in the beginning of the outbreak and reached up to 84% (80/95) within 6 months while the morbidity began with 33% (1/3) and reached up to 68% (54/80) in the spring of 2006. The nursing sow of diseased piglets manifested no other clinical signs than localized transient rashes or slight EE on the abdomen skin but recovered in a few days.

Bottom Line: Surprisingly, this isolate was a member of S. sciuri rather than S. hyicus as identified by its biochemical traits and also by analysis of 23S ribosomal DNA using Internal Transcribed Spacer PCR.In addition, inoculation of newborn piglets with 1x10(10) CFU of the isolate by oral feeding or intra-muscular injection successfully reproduced EE in piglets, which suggested that the oral intake of the pathogen by the animals is one of the major routes of exposure.These unexpected findings prioritized S. sciuri as important zoonotic agents, which may have ramifications for human medicine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ministry of Agriculture Key Laboratory of Preventive Veterinary Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Staphylococcus sciuri are important human pathogens responsible for endocarditis, peritonitis, septic shock, urinary tract infection, pelvic inflammatory disease and wound infections. However, little information is known regarding the pathogenicity of S. sciuri to animals. From the pericardial fluid of a diseased piglet with exudative epidermitis (EE), we isolated a strain of Staphylococcus in pure culture. Surprisingly, this isolate was a member of S. sciuri rather than S. hyicus as identified by its biochemical traits and also by analysis of 23S ribosomal DNA using Internal Transcribed Spacer PCR. In addition, inoculation of newborn piglets with 1x10(10) CFU of the isolate by oral feeding or intra-muscular injection successfully reproduced EE in piglets, which suggested that the oral intake of the pathogen by the animals is one of the major routes of exposure. These unexpected findings prioritized S. sciuri as important zoonotic agents, which may have ramifications for human medicine.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus