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Virtual sonography through the Internet: volume compression issues.

Ferrer-Roca O, Vilarchao-Cavia J, Troyano-Luque JM, Clavijo M - J. Med. Internet Res. (2001 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second.This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pathology, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, 38071, Canary Islands, Spain. catai@teide.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Three-dimensional ultrasound images allow virtual sonography even at a distance. However, the size of final 3-D files limits their transmission through slow networks such as the Internet.

Objective: To analyze compression techniques that transform ultrasound images into small 3-D volumes that can be transmitted through the Internet without loss of relevant medical information.

Methods: Samples were selected from ultrasound examinations performed during, 1999-2000, in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at the University Hospital in La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain. The conventional ultrasound video output was recorded at 25 fps (frames per second) on a PC, producing 100- to 120-MB files (for from 500 to 550 frames). Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.

Results: The original frames passed through different compression stages: selecting the region of interest, rendering techniques, and compression for storage. Final 3-D volumes reached 1:25 compression rates (1.5- to 2-MB files). Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second. At the receiving site, virtual sonography is possible using orthogonal projections or oblique cuts.

Conclusions: Modern volume-rendering techniques allowed distant virtual sonography through the Internet. This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Image at 16-MB resolution with standard sampling. File size is 15.8 MB at display and 5.24 MB stored. Top image: orthogonal plane slice 86. Bottom image: 3D image
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figure8: Image at 16-MB resolution with standard sampling. File size is 15.8 MB at display and 5.24 MB stored. Top image: orthogonal plane slice 86. Bottom image: 3D image

Mentions: Algorithm 2 produces a larger final-file-size and a lower-quality image (Figure 3,Figure 4), due to the voxel averaging technique. Algorithm 1 produces a smaller final-file-size and a higher-quality image (Figure 5,Figure 6,Figure 7,Figure 8).


Virtual sonography through the Internet: volume compression issues.

Ferrer-Roca O, Vilarchao-Cavia J, Troyano-Luque JM, Clavijo M - J. Med. Internet Res. (2001 Apr-Jun)

Image at 16-MB resolution with standard sampling. File size is 15.8 MB at display and 5.24 MB stored. Top image: orthogonal plane slice 86. Bottom image: 3D image
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1761897&req=5

figure8: Image at 16-MB resolution with standard sampling. File size is 15.8 MB at display and 5.24 MB stored. Top image: orthogonal plane slice 86. Bottom image: 3D image
Mentions: Algorithm 2 produces a larger final-file-size and a lower-quality image (Figure 3,Figure 4), due to the voxel averaging technique. Algorithm 1 produces a smaller final-file-size and a higher-quality image (Figure 5,Figure 6,Figure 7,Figure 8).

Bottom Line: Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second.This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pathology, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, 38071, Canary Islands, Spain. catai@teide.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Three-dimensional ultrasound images allow virtual sonography even at a distance. However, the size of final 3-D files limits their transmission through slow networks such as the Internet.

Objective: To analyze compression techniques that transform ultrasound images into small 3-D volumes that can be transmitted through the Internet without loss of relevant medical information.

Methods: Samples were selected from ultrasound examinations performed during, 1999-2000, in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at the University Hospital in La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain. The conventional ultrasound video output was recorded at 25 fps (frames per second) on a PC, producing 100- to 120-MB files (for from 500 to 550 frames). Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.

Results: The original frames passed through different compression stages: selecting the region of interest, rendering techniques, and compression for storage. Final 3-D volumes reached 1:25 compression rates (1.5- to 2-MB files). Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second. At the receiving site, virtual sonography is possible using orthogonal projections or oblique cuts.

Conclusions: Modern volume-rendering techniques allowed distant virtual sonography through the Internet. This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus