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Virtual sonography through the Internet: volume compression issues.

Ferrer-Roca O, Vilarchao-Cavia J, Troyano-Luque JM, Clavijo M - J. Med. Internet Res. (2001 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second.This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pathology, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, 38071, Canary Islands, Spain. catai@teide.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Three-dimensional ultrasound images allow virtual sonography even at a distance. However, the size of final 3-D files limits their transmission through slow networks such as the Internet.

Objective: To analyze compression techniques that transform ultrasound images into small 3-D volumes that can be transmitted through the Internet without loss of relevant medical information.

Methods: Samples were selected from ultrasound examinations performed during, 1999-2000, in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at the University Hospital in La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain. The conventional ultrasound video output was recorded at 25 fps (frames per second) on a PC, producing 100- to 120-MB files (for from 500 to 550 frames). Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.

Results: The original frames passed through different compression stages: selecting the region of interest, rendering techniques, and compression for storage. Final 3-D volumes reached 1:25 compression rates (1.5- to 2-MB files). Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second. At the receiving site, virtual sonography is possible using orthogonal projections or oblique cuts.

Conclusions: Modern volume-rendering techniques allowed distant virtual sonography through the Internet. This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

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Compression scheme of the TeleInVivo software. MB data indicates file size
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figure2: Compression scheme of the TeleInVivo software. MB data indicates file size

Mentions: The moving frames, recorded with the ultrasound device, have an original size of 100 to 120 MB (from 500 to 550 single frames). This size must be drastically reduced. The size-reduction process is shown in Figure 2, together with intermediate file sizes obtained using an example with an original size of 126 MB before storage and 106 MB after storage.


Virtual sonography through the Internet: volume compression issues.

Ferrer-Roca O, Vilarchao-Cavia J, Troyano-Luque JM, Clavijo M - J. Med. Internet Res. (2001 Apr-Jun)

Compression scheme of the TeleInVivo software. MB data indicates file size
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1761897&req=5

figure2: Compression scheme of the TeleInVivo software. MB data indicates file size
Mentions: The moving frames, recorded with the ultrasound device, have an original size of 100 to 120 MB (from 500 to 550 single frames). This size must be drastically reduced. The size-reduction process is shown in Figure 2, together with intermediate file sizes obtained using an example with an original size of 126 MB before storage and 106 MB after storage.

Bottom Line: Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second.This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Pathology, University of La Laguna, Tenerife, 38071, Canary Islands, Spain. catai@teide.net

ABSTRACT

Background: Three-dimensional ultrasound images allow virtual sonography even at a distance. However, the size of final 3-D files limits their transmission through slow networks such as the Internet.

Objective: To analyze compression techniques that transform ultrasound images into small 3-D volumes that can be transmitted through the Internet without loss of relevant medical information.

Methods: Samples were selected from ultrasound examinations performed during, 1999-2000, in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department at the University Hospital in La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain. The conventional ultrasound video output was recorded at 25 fps (frames per second) on a PC, producing 100- to 120-MB files (for from 500 to 550 frames). Processing to obtain 3-D images progressively reduced file size.

Results: The original frames passed through different compression stages: selecting the region of interest, rendering techniques, and compression for storage. Final 3-D volumes reached 1:25 compression rates (1.5- to 2-MB files). Those volumes need 7 to 8 minutes to be transmitted through the Internet at a mean data throughput of 6.6 Kbytes per second. At the receiving site, virtual sonography is possible using orthogonal projections or oblique cuts.

Conclusions: Modern volume-rendering techniques allowed distant virtual sonography through the Internet. This is the result of their efficient data compression that maintains its attractiveness as a main criterion for distant diagnosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus