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A systematic review of outcomes assessed in randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a reference tool.

Jerosch-Herold C, Leite JC, Song F - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2006)

Bottom Line: The most frequently assessed outcomes were self-reported symptom resolution, grip or pinch strength and return to work.The majority of outcome measures employed assessed impairment of body function and body structure and a small number of studies used measures of activity and participation.Further work on developing consensus on such a core set is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Allied Health Professions, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. c.jerosch-herold@uea.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: A wide range of outcomes have been assessed in trials of interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), however there appears to be little consensus on what constitutes the most relevant outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the outcomes assessed in randomized clinical trials of surgical interventions for CTS and to compare these to the concepts contained in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

Methods: The bibliographic databases Medline, AMED and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials of surgical treatment for CTS. The outcomes assessed in these trials were identified, classified and linked to the different domains of the ICF.

Results: Twenty-eight studies were retrieved which met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently assessed outcomes were self-reported symptom resolution, grip or pinch strength and return to work. The majority of outcome measures employed assessed impairment of body function and body structure and a small number of studies used measures of activity and participation.

Conclusion: The ICF provides a useful framework for identifying the concepts contained in outcome measures employed to date in trials of surgical intervention for CTS and may help in the selection of the most appropriate domains to be assessed, especially where studies are designed to capture the impact of the intervention at individual and societal level. Comparison of results from different studies and meta-analysis would be facilitated through the use of a core set of standardised outcome measures which cross all domains of the ICF. Further work on developing consensus on such a core set is needed.

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Interaction of concepts of the ICF and relation to outcome domains assessed in CTS trials (adapted from ICF, WHO 2002).
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Figure 1: Interaction of concepts of the ICF and relation to outcome domains assessed in CTS trials (adapted from ICF, WHO 2002).

Mentions: Using the ICF as a framework, firstly the codes and categories within health and health-related domains relevant to CTS were identified (see figure 1). Secondly the outcomes assessed in the 28 studies retrieved were mapped to the relevant domains and categories of the ICF. Where instruments contained subscales and several items these were individually assigned to the relevant category (see table 5). The frequency with which the domains and categories of the ICF were assessed in all 28 studies is presented in Figure 2.


A systematic review of outcomes assessed in randomized controlled trials of surgical interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a reference tool.

Jerosch-Herold C, Leite JC, Song F - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2006)

Interaction of concepts of the ICF and relation to outcome domains assessed in CTS trials (adapted from ICF, WHO 2002).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1713237&req=5

Figure 1: Interaction of concepts of the ICF and relation to outcome domains assessed in CTS trials (adapted from ICF, WHO 2002).
Mentions: Using the ICF as a framework, firstly the codes and categories within health and health-related domains relevant to CTS were identified (see figure 1). Secondly the outcomes assessed in the 28 studies retrieved were mapped to the relevant domains and categories of the ICF. Where instruments contained subscales and several items these were individually assigned to the relevant category (see table 5). The frequency with which the domains and categories of the ICF were assessed in all 28 studies is presented in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: The most frequently assessed outcomes were self-reported symptom resolution, grip or pinch strength and return to work.The majority of outcome measures employed assessed impairment of body function and body structure and a small number of studies used measures of activity and participation.Further work on developing consensus on such a core set is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Allied Health Professions, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. c.jerosch-herold@uea.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: A wide range of outcomes have been assessed in trials of interventions for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), however there appears to be little consensus on what constitutes the most relevant outcomes. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify the outcomes assessed in randomized clinical trials of surgical interventions for CTS and to compare these to the concepts contained in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

Methods: The bibliographic databases Medline, AMED and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials of surgical treatment for CTS. The outcomes assessed in these trials were identified, classified and linked to the different domains of the ICF.

Results: Twenty-eight studies were retrieved which met the inclusion criteria. The most frequently assessed outcomes were self-reported symptom resolution, grip or pinch strength and return to work. The majority of outcome measures employed assessed impairment of body function and body structure and a small number of studies used measures of activity and participation.

Conclusion: The ICF provides a useful framework for identifying the concepts contained in outcome measures employed to date in trials of surgical intervention for CTS and may help in the selection of the most appropriate domains to be assessed, especially where studies are designed to capture the impact of the intervention at individual and societal level. Comparison of results from different studies and meta-analysis would be facilitated through the use of a core set of standardised outcome measures which cross all domains of the ICF. Further work on developing consensus on such a core set is needed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus