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Cardiac autonomic control mechanisms in power-frequency magnetic fields: a multistudy analysis.

Graham C, Cook MR, Sastre A, Gerkovich MM, Kavet R - Environ. Health Perspect. (2000)

Bottom Line: Four separate analytic techniques failed to identify a valid subpopulation of sensitive individuals.In some studies, however, hourly blood samples were collected using an indwelling venous catheter.This result suggests a field interaction with modest arousal or disturbance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. cgraham@mriresearch.org

ABSTRACT
Heart rate variability (HRV), a noninvasive indicator of autonomic control of cardiac activity, is predictive of long-term cardiac morbidity and mortality. Epidemiologic research suggests that occupational exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields may be associated with autonomically mediated cardiac mortality. Results from our laboratory studies of humans exposed to 60-Hz magnetic fields overnight, however, are inconsistent. HRV is altered in some studies but not others. To clarify this, the pooled data from seven studies involving 172 men were analyzed to test specific hypotheses concerning this inconsistency. After analysis, we excluded a) measurement drift or instability over time because HRV was stable under sham-exposed conditions across all studies; b) inadequate statistical power or failure to maintain double-blind controls; c) differences in field intensity (28.3 vs. 127.3 microT) or exposure pattern (intermittent versus continuous) as main effects; or d) the inclusion of individuals sensitive to magnetic field exposure in some studies but not others. Four separate analytic techniques failed to identify a valid subpopulation of sensitive individuals. In some studies, however, hourly blood samples were collected using an indwelling venous catheter. HRV alterations occurred during intermittent exposure in these studies (p < 0.05) but not in similar studies without blood sampling. This result suggests a field interaction with modest arousal or disturbance. Because HRV is tightly coupled to electroencephalographic activity during sleep, these results are physiologically plausible and suggest that HRV alterations during exposure to magnetic fields may occur when accompanied by increases in physiologic arousal, stress, or sleep disturbance.

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Cardiac autonomic control mechanisms in power-frequency magnetic fields: a multistudy analysis.

Graham C, Cook MR, Sastre A, Gerkovich MM, Kavet R - Environ. Health Perspect. (2000)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1638289&req=5

Bottom Line: Four separate analytic techniques failed to identify a valid subpopulation of sensitive individuals.In some studies, however, hourly blood samples were collected using an indwelling venous catheter.This result suggests a field interaction with modest arousal or disturbance.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, Missouri, USA. cgraham@mriresearch.org

ABSTRACT
Heart rate variability (HRV), a noninvasive indicator of autonomic control of cardiac activity, is predictive of long-term cardiac morbidity and mortality. Epidemiologic research suggests that occupational exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields may be associated with autonomically mediated cardiac mortality. Results from our laboratory studies of humans exposed to 60-Hz magnetic fields overnight, however, are inconsistent. HRV is altered in some studies but not others. To clarify this, the pooled data from seven studies involving 172 men were analyzed to test specific hypotheses concerning this inconsistency. After analysis, we excluded a) measurement drift or instability over time because HRV was stable under sham-exposed conditions across all studies; b) inadequate statistical power or failure to maintain double-blind controls; c) differences in field intensity (28.3 vs. 127.3 microT) or exposure pattern (intermittent versus continuous) as main effects; or d) the inclusion of individuals sensitive to magnetic field exposure in some studies but not others. Four separate analytic techniques failed to identify a valid subpopulation of sensitive individuals. In some studies, however, hourly blood samples were collected using an indwelling venous catheter. HRV alterations occurred during intermittent exposure in these studies (p < 0.05) but not in similar studies without blood sampling. This result suggests a field interaction with modest arousal or disturbance. Because HRV is tightly coupled to electroencephalographic activity during sleep, these results are physiologically plausible and suggest that HRV alterations during exposure to magnetic fields may occur when accompanied by increases in physiologic arousal, stress, or sleep disturbance.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus