Limits...
Field concentrations and persistence of polybrominated biphenyls in soils and solubility of PBB in natural waters.

Jacobs LW, Chou SF, Tiedje JM - Environ. Health Perspect. (1978)

Bottom Line: No evidence of significant degradation of PBB was noted after 1 year incubation in soil.Photodegradation does not appear to be a significant fate of PBB in manures spread on fields since no change was noted in the relative concentrations of isomers in soil samples from our field survey.Studies with distilled, tap, river, and soil waters showed that PBB solubility was markedly influenced by water composition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Soil samples were collected from 28 fields which had received manure from Michigan's most highly contaminated dairy herds. The number of fields in each concentration range of PBB in soil were: 2, not detectable; 15, 0.0 to 8.0 ppb; 6, 14-102 ppb, and 5, 153 to 371 ppb. Plant tissue sampled from the 10 most highly contaminated fields contained no detectable PBB. No evidence of significant degradation of PBB was noted after 1 year incubation in soil. When 14C hexabromobiphenyl and heptabromobiphenyl isomers were incubated in soil less than 0.2% of the 14C was volatilized. Also gas chromatographic analysis of soil extracts showed no difference in recovery of the six major PBB isomers between sterilized and nonsterilized soil. Analysis of these extracts by thin layer chromatography and autoradiography showed no 14C-PBB intermediates. Photodegradation products of the major hexa- and heptabromobiphenyl isomers showed more but still minor (approximately 3%) biodegradation in soil. Much of the photodegradation products appeared bound to soil, since these products could not be extracted from soil. Photodegradation does not appear to be a significant fate of PBB in manures spread on fields since no change was noted in the relative concentrations of isomers in soil samples from our field survey. Studies with distilled, tap, river, and soil waters showed that PBB solubility was markedly influenced by water composition.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1637440&req=5


Field concentrations and persistence of polybrominated biphenyls in soils and solubility of PBB in natural waters.

Jacobs LW, Chou SF, Tiedje JM - Environ. Health Perspect. (1978)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1637440&req=5

Bottom Line: No evidence of significant degradation of PBB was noted after 1 year incubation in soil.Photodegradation does not appear to be a significant fate of PBB in manures spread on fields since no change was noted in the relative concentrations of isomers in soil samples from our field survey.Studies with distilled, tap, river, and soil waters showed that PBB solubility was markedly influenced by water composition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Soil samples were collected from 28 fields which had received manure from Michigan's most highly contaminated dairy herds. The number of fields in each concentration range of PBB in soil were: 2, not detectable; 15, 0.0 to 8.0 ppb; 6, 14-102 ppb, and 5, 153 to 371 ppb. Plant tissue sampled from the 10 most highly contaminated fields contained no detectable PBB. No evidence of significant degradation of PBB was noted after 1 year incubation in soil. When 14C hexabromobiphenyl and heptabromobiphenyl isomers were incubated in soil less than 0.2% of the 14C was volatilized. Also gas chromatographic analysis of soil extracts showed no difference in recovery of the six major PBB isomers between sterilized and nonsterilized soil. Analysis of these extracts by thin layer chromatography and autoradiography showed no 14C-PBB intermediates. Photodegradation products of the major hexa- and heptabromobiphenyl isomers showed more but still minor (approximately 3%) biodegradation in soil. Much of the photodegradation products appeared bound to soil, since these products could not be extracted from soil. Photodegradation does not appear to be a significant fate of PBB in manures spread on fields since no change was noted in the relative concentrations of isomers in soil samples from our field survey. Studies with distilled, tap, river, and soil waters showed that PBB solubility was markedly influenced by water composition.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus