Limits...
Prevalence of overweight among elementary and middle school students in Mississippi compared with prevalence data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System.

Kolbo JR, Penman AD, Meyer MK, Speed NM, Molaison EF, Zhang L - Prev Chronic Dis (2006)

Bottom Line: Students in randomly selected classes from 37 sampled elementary and middle schools throughout Mississippi participated in the study.School staff were trained to collect height and weight data using a standardized procedure.In the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey, 25.2% of students in grades 6 through 8 were found to be overweight, compared with 18.5% in the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Miss 39406, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The purpose of the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey was to estimate the prevalence of overweight and at risk for becoming overweight among children in Mississippi (grades 1-8) using height and weight measures instead of self-report and to compare the findings for grades 6 through 8 with data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System for middle school students (grades 6-8).

Methods: Students in randomly selected classes from 37 sampled elementary and middle schools throughout Mississippi participated in the study. School staff were trained to collect height and weight data using a standardized procedure.

Results: Overall, 24.0% of students in grades 1 through 8 were found to be overweight, and another 14.7% were at risk for becoming overweight. With the exception of sixth grade, there was a trend of increasing prevalence of overweight by grade (17.5% in grade 1 compared with 31.3% in grade 8). In the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey, 25.2% of students in grades 6 through 8 were found to be overweight, compared with 18.5% in the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System.

Conclusion: A high percentage of students in Mississippi are already overweight in first grade, and the prevalence tends to increase by grade. Data collected from middle school students through measured heights and weights in the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey were higher than self-reported data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Our data suggest that self-reported data underestimate the prevalence of overweight among middle school students. Efforts to monitor students' body mass index and assess effectiveness of interventions should include all grades and use measured heights and weights rather than self-reports.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of 95% confidence intervals for prevalence of at risk for becoming overweight among students in grades 6 through 8 from the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey (CAYPOS) and the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), by sex and race, Mississippi, 2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1636714&req=5

Figure 2: Comparison of 95% confidence intervals for prevalence of at risk for becoming overweight among students in grades 6 through 8 from the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey (CAYPOS) and the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), by sex and race, Mississippi, 2003.

Mentions: The CAYPOS sample included 483 students from 17 middle schools (Table 1). In CAYPOS, 25.2% of students in grades 6 through 8 were found to be overweight, and another 15.2% were at risk of overweight, compared with 18.5% overweight and 20.7% at risk of overweight in the YRBSS. In all subgroups (with the exception of sixth-grade students), estimates of the prevalence of overweight from CAYPOS were higher than estimates from the YRBSS. However, in all cases, the 95% confidence intervals were wide and overlapped (Figure 1 and Table 4). Estimates of the prevalence of at risk for becoming overweight from the CAYPOS were lower than estimates from the YRBSS. Again, in most cases, the confidence intervals overlapped (Figure 2 and Table 4). The difference in the point estimates between the two surveys was large (approximately 13 percentage points): 31.3% from CAYPOS compared with 17.9% from YRBSS in grade 8 and 27.7% from CAYPOS compared with 14.7% from YRBSS in grade 7.


Prevalence of overweight among elementary and middle school students in Mississippi compared with prevalence data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System.

Kolbo JR, Penman AD, Meyer MK, Speed NM, Molaison EF, Zhang L - Prev Chronic Dis (2006)

Comparison of 95% confidence intervals for prevalence of at risk for becoming overweight among students in grades 6 through 8 from the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey (CAYPOS) and the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), by sex and race, Mississippi, 2003.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1636714&req=5

Figure 2: Comparison of 95% confidence intervals for prevalence of at risk for becoming overweight among students in grades 6 through 8 from the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey (CAYPOS) and the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS), by sex and race, Mississippi, 2003.
Mentions: The CAYPOS sample included 483 students from 17 middle schools (Table 1). In CAYPOS, 25.2% of students in grades 6 through 8 were found to be overweight, and another 15.2% were at risk of overweight, compared with 18.5% overweight and 20.7% at risk of overweight in the YRBSS. In all subgroups (with the exception of sixth-grade students), estimates of the prevalence of overweight from CAYPOS were higher than estimates from the YRBSS. However, in all cases, the 95% confidence intervals were wide and overlapped (Figure 1 and Table 4). Estimates of the prevalence of at risk for becoming overweight from the CAYPOS were lower than estimates from the YRBSS. Again, in most cases, the confidence intervals overlapped (Figure 2 and Table 4). The difference in the point estimates between the two surveys was large (approximately 13 percentage points): 31.3% from CAYPOS compared with 17.9% from YRBSS in grade 8 and 27.7% from CAYPOS compared with 14.7% from YRBSS in grade 7.

Bottom Line: Students in randomly selected classes from 37 sampled elementary and middle schools throughout Mississippi participated in the study.School staff were trained to collect height and weight data using a standardized procedure.In the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey, 25.2% of students in grades 6 through 8 were found to be overweight, compared with 18.5% in the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Miss 39406, USA.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The purpose of the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey was to estimate the prevalence of overweight and at risk for becoming overweight among children in Mississippi (grades 1-8) using height and weight measures instead of self-report and to compare the findings for grades 6 through 8 with data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System for middle school students (grades 6-8).

Methods: Students in randomly selected classes from 37 sampled elementary and middle schools throughout Mississippi participated in the study. School staff were trained to collect height and weight data using a standardized procedure.

Results: Overall, 24.0% of students in grades 1 through 8 were found to be overweight, and another 14.7% were at risk for becoming overweight. With the exception of sixth grade, there was a trend of increasing prevalence of overweight by grade (17.5% in grade 1 compared with 31.3% in grade 8). In the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey, 25.2% of students in grades 6 through 8 were found to be overweight, compared with 18.5% in the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System.

Conclusion: A high percentage of students in Mississippi are already overweight in first grade, and the prevalence tends to increase by grade. Data collected from middle school students through measured heights and weights in the Child and Youth Prevalence of Overweight Survey were higher than self-reported data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Our data suggest that self-reported data underestimate the prevalence of overweight among middle school students. Efforts to monitor students' body mass index and assess effectiveness of interventions should include all grades and use measured heights and weights rather than self-reports.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus