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Oynophagia in patients after dental extraction: surface electromyography study.

Vaiman M, Nahlieli O, Eliav E - Head Face Med (2006)

Bottom Line: The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group.This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect.The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in EMG monitoring during treatment of post-surgical oral cavity discomfort and dysphagia.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. vaimed@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Surface electromyographic (sEMG) studies were performed on 40 adult patients following extraction of lower third and second molars to research the approach and limitations of sEMG evaluation of their odynophagia complaints.

Methods: Parameters evaluated during swallowing and drinking include the timing, number of swallows per 100 cc of water, and range (amplitude) of EMG activity of m. masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular group. The above mentioned variables (mean + standard deviation) were measured for the group of dental patients (n = 40) and control group of healthy adults (n = 40).

Results: The duration of swallows and drinking in all tests showed increase in dental patients' group, in which this tendency is statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between male and female adults' duration and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking in both groups (p = 0.05). The mean of electric activity (in muV) of m. masseter was significantly lower in the dental patients' group in comparison with control group. The electric activity of submental-submandimular and infrahyoid muscle groups was the same in both groups.

Conclusion: Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for evaluation of odynophagia/dysphagia complaints following dental extraction with low level of discomfort of the examination. The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group. This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect. The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in EMG monitoring during treatment of post-surgical oral cavity discomfort and dysphagia.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A subject with masseter, submental-submandibular and infrahyoid muscles locations of EMG electrodes. The picture also shows the orbiculars oris location of electrodes. This location, while being less informative, can be used if some additional information on oral function is required.
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Figure 1: A subject with masseter, submental-submandibular and infrahyoid muscles locations of EMG electrodes. The picture also shows the orbiculars oris location of electrodes. This location, while being less informative, can be used if some additional information on oral function is required.

Mentions: The interelectrode distance was 10 mm. Specific electrode positions were as follows (Fig. 1): (1) Two bipolar stick-on surface electrodes were placed parallel to the masseter muscle fibers on the side opposite to the operated side of the face. (2) Two surface electrodes were attached to the skin beneath the chin on the right or left side of midline (beneath the operation site) to record submental myoelectrical activity over the platisma. (3) Two electrodes were placed on the left side of the thyroid cartilage to record from the infrahyoid (laryngeal strap) muscles. The exact electrode positions for each muscle are known since the 19th century [17,18], and in addition were clarified following anatomical correlates [19]. Each pair of electrodes had a third electrode as ground. In case of AE-131, the common (ground) electrode is designed close to the differential (active) electrodes. Electrical impedance at sites of electrode contact was reduced, as target areas were lightly scrubbed with alcohol gauze pads, followed by application of an electrode gel.


Oynophagia in patients after dental extraction: surface electromyography study.

Vaiman M, Nahlieli O, Eliav E - Head Face Med (2006)

A subject with masseter, submental-submandibular and infrahyoid muscles locations of EMG electrodes. The picture also shows the orbiculars oris location of electrodes. This location, while being less informative, can be used if some additional information on oral function is required.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1621058&req=5

Figure 1: A subject with masseter, submental-submandibular and infrahyoid muscles locations of EMG electrodes. The picture also shows the orbiculars oris location of electrodes. This location, while being less informative, can be used if some additional information on oral function is required.
Mentions: The interelectrode distance was 10 mm. Specific electrode positions were as follows (Fig. 1): (1) Two bipolar stick-on surface electrodes were placed parallel to the masseter muscle fibers on the side opposite to the operated side of the face. (2) Two surface electrodes were attached to the skin beneath the chin on the right or left side of midline (beneath the operation site) to record submental myoelectrical activity over the platisma. (3) Two electrodes were placed on the left side of the thyroid cartilage to record from the infrahyoid (laryngeal strap) muscles. The exact electrode positions for each muscle are known since the 19th century [17,18], and in addition were clarified following anatomical correlates [19]. Each pair of electrodes had a third electrode as ground. In case of AE-131, the common (ground) electrode is designed close to the differential (active) electrodes. Electrical impedance at sites of electrode contact was reduced, as target areas were lightly scrubbed with alcohol gauze pads, followed by application of an electrode gel.

Bottom Line: The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group.This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect.The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in EMG monitoring during treatment of post-surgical oral cavity discomfort and dysphagia.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Otolaryngology, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, affiliated to the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. vaimed@yahoo.com

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Surface electromyographic (sEMG) studies were performed on 40 adult patients following extraction of lower third and second molars to research the approach and limitations of sEMG evaluation of their odynophagia complaints.

Methods: Parameters evaluated during swallowing and drinking include the timing, number of swallows per 100 cc of water, and range (amplitude) of EMG activity of m. masseter, infrahyoid and submental-submandibular group. The above mentioned variables (mean + standard deviation) were measured for the group of dental patients (n = 40) and control group of healthy adults (n = 40).

Results: The duration of swallows and drinking in all tests showed increase in dental patients' group, in which this tendency is statistically significant. There was no statistically significant difference between male and female adults' duration and amplitude of muscle activity during continuous drinking in both groups (p = 0.05). The mean of electric activity (in muV) of m. masseter was significantly lower in the dental patients' group in comparison with control group. The electric activity of submental-submandimular and infrahyoid muscle groups was the same in both groups.

Conclusion: Surface EMG of swallowing is a simple and reliable noninvasive method for evaluation of odynophagia/dysphagia complaints following dental extraction with low level of discomfort of the examination. The surface EMG studies prove that dysphagia following dental extraction and molar surgery has oral origin, does not affect pharingeal segment and submental-submandibular muscle group. This type of dysphagia has clear EMG signs: increased duration of single swallow, longer drinking time, low range of electric activity of m. masseter, normal range of activity of submental-submandibular muscle group, and the "dry swalow" aftereffect. The data can be used for evaluation of complaints and symptoms, as well as for comparison purposes in pre- and postoperative stages and in EMG monitoring during treatment of post-surgical oral cavity discomfort and dysphagia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus