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A markup language for electrocardiogram data acquisition and analysis (ecgML).

Wang H, Azuaje F, Jung B, Black N - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2003)

Bottom Line: The models proposed here can facilitate the generation of a data format, which opens ways for better and clearer interpretation by both humans and machines.Its structured and transparent organisation will allow researchers to expand and test its capabilities in different application domains.The specification and programs for this protocol are publicly available.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing and Mathematics, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK. hy.wang@ulster.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The storage and distribution of electrocardiogram data is based on different formats. There is a need to promote the development of standards for their exchange and analysis. Such models should be platform-/ system- and application-independent, flexible and open to every member of the scientific community.

Methods: A minimum set of information for the representation and storage of electrocardiogram signals has been synthesised from existing recommendations. This specification is encoded into an XML-vocabulary. The model may aid in a flexible exchange and analysis of electrocardiogram information.

Results: Based on advantages of XML technologies, ecgML has the ability to present a system-, application- and format-independent solution for representation and exchange of electrocardiogram data. The distinction between the proposal developed by the U.S Food and Drug Administration and ecgML model is given. A series of tools, which aim to facilitate ecgML-based applications, are presented.

Conclusions: The models proposed here can facilitate the generation of a data format, which opens ways for better and clearer interpretation by both humans and machines. Its structured and transparent organisation will allow researchers to expand and test its capabilities in different application domains. The specification and programs for this protocol are publicly available.

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The tree diagram of ecgML: RecordData element
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Figure 4: The tree diagram of ecgML: RecordData element


A markup language for electrocardiogram data acquisition and analysis (ecgML).

Wang H, Azuaje F, Jung B, Black N - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2003)

The tree diagram of ecgML: RecordData element
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC161810&req=5

Figure 4: The tree diagram of ecgML: RecordData element
Bottom Line: The models proposed here can facilitate the generation of a data format, which opens ways for better and clearer interpretation by both humans and machines.Its structured and transparent organisation will allow researchers to expand and test its capabilities in different application domains.The specification and programs for this protocol are publicly available.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Computing and Mathematics, University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, BT37 0QB, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland, UK. hy.wang@ulster.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Background: The storage and distribution of electrocardiogram data is based on different formats. There is a need to promote the development of standards for their exchange and analysis. Such models should be platform-/ system- and application-independent, flexible and open to every member of the scientific community.

Methods: A minimum set of information for the representation and storage of electrocardiogram signals has been synthesised from existing recommendations. This specification is encoded into an XML-vocabulary. The model may aid in a flexible exchange and analysis of electrocardiogram information.

Results: Based on advantages of XML technologies, ecgML has the ability to present a system-, application- and format-independent solution for representation and exchange of electrocardiogram data. The distinction between the proposal developed by the U.S Food and Drug Administration and ecgML model is given. A series of tools, which aim to facilitate ecgML-based applications, are presented.

Conclusions: The models proposed here can facilitate the generation of a data format, which opens ways for better and clearer interpretation by both humans and machines. Its structured and transparent organisation will allow researchers to expand and test its capabilities in different application domains. The specification and programs for this protocol are publicly available.

Show MeSH