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Survival strategies for transposons and genomes.

Martin SL, Garfinkel DJ - Genome Biol. (2003)

Bottom Line: A report on the Keystone Symposium "Transposition and other genome rearrangements", Santa Fe, USA, 8-14 February 2003.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Box B111, 4200 E, Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO 80262, USA. Sandy.Martin@UCHSC.edu

ABSTRACT
A report on the Keystone Symposium "Transposition and other genome rearrangements", Santa Fe, USA, 8-14 February 2003.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Major classes of transposable elements. (a) A non-LTR transposon, which is characterized by a poly(A) tail at its 3' end undergoes replication via transcription, translation and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly followed by cDNA synthesis by target-site-primed reverse transcription. (b) An LTR retrotransposon containing directly repeated LTRs at its ends is replicated via reverse transcription into cDNA in the retroviral particle and is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (c) A DNA transposon, which has short inverted repeats at each end, can be excised (leaving a DNA break) by its transposase, which has been translated in the cytoplasm. The transposon is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (d) A mitochondrial type II intron is replicated via a cycle involving reverse splicing of the intron into the top strand of the mitochondrial DNA. This step is followed by endo cleavage of the bottom strand and cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase. Key features of the different elements are indicated; gray boxes indicate open reading frames for proteins.
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Figure 1: Major classes of transposable elements. (a) A non-LTR transposon, which is characterized by a poly(A) tail at its 3' end undergoes replication via transcription, translation and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly followed by cDNA synthesis by target-site-primed reverse transcription. (b) An LTR retrotransposon containing directly repeated LTRs at its ends is replicated via reverse transcription into cDNA in the retroviral particle and is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (c) A DNA transposon, which has short inverted repeats at each end, can be excised (leaving a DNA break) by its transposase, which has been translated in the cytoplasm. The transposon is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (d) A mitochondrial type II intron is replicated via a cycle involving reverse splicing of the intron into the top strand of the mitochondrial DNA. This step is followed by endo cleavage of the bottom strand and cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase. Key features of the different elements are indicated; gray boxes indicate open reading frames for proteins.

Mentions: The Keystone Symposium "Transposition and other genome rearrangements" covered every level of genome dynamics. The topics ranged from the mechanistic details of transposition and site-specific recombination at the atomic level, through to interactions between transposable elements and the genomes in which they reside that enhance, prevent or control transposon movement, and on to the recognition and classification of novel mobile elements. Recently released genome sequences of human, mouse, mosquito, Chlamydomonas, rice, and fission yeast provided a rich context for a lively and informative meeting. Here, we highlight the presentations that are of special interest to the readership of Genome Biology, as they emphasized how transposable elements and their hosts interact in the 'genomic ecosystem' (Figure 1).


Survival strategies for transposons and genomes.

Martin SL, Garfinkel DJ - Genome Biol. (2003)

Major classes of transposable elements. (a) A non-LTR transposon, which is characterized by a poly(A) tail at its 3' end undergoes replication via transcription, translation and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly followed by cDNA synthesis by target-site-primed reverse transcription. (b) An LTR retrotransposon containing directly repeated LTRs at its ends is replicated via reverse transcription into cDNA in the retroviral particle and is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (c) A DNA transposon, which has short inverted repeats at each end, can be excised (leaving a DNA break) by its transposase, which has been translated in the cytoplasm. The transposon is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (d) A mitochondrial type II intron is replicated via a cycle involving reverse splicing of the intron into the top strand of the mitochondrial DNA. This step is followed by endo cleavage of the bottom strand and cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase. Key features of the different elements are indicated; gray boxes indicate open reading frames for proteins.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC154573&req=5

Figure 1: Major classes of transposable elements. (a) A non-LTR transposon, which is characterized by a poly(A) tail at its 3' end undergoes replication via transcription, translation and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly followed by cDNA synthesis by target-site-primed reverse transcription. (b) An LTR retrotransposon containing directly repeated LTRs at its ends is replicated via reverse transcription into cDNA in the retroviral particle and is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (c) A DNA transposon, which has short inverted repeats at each end, can be excised (leaving a DNA break) by its transposase, which has been translated in the cytoplasm. The transposon is then integrated into a new chromosomal site. (d) A mitochondrial type II intron is replicated via a cycle involving reverse splicing of the intron into the top strand of the mitochondrial DNA. This step is followed by endo cleavage of the bottom strand and cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase. Key features of the different elements are indicated; gray boxes indicate open reading frames for proteins.
Mentions: The Keystone Symposium "Transposition and other genome rearrangements" covered every level of genome dynamics. The topics ranged from the mechanistic details of transposition and site-specific recombination at the atomic level, through to interactions between transposable elements and the genomes in which they reside that enhance, prevent or control transposon movement, and on to the recognition and classification of novel mobile elements. Recently released genome sequences of human, mouse, mosquito, Chlamydomonas, rice, and fission yeast provided a rich context for a lively and informative meeting. Here, we highlight the presentations that are of special interest to the readership of Genome Biology, as they emphasized how transposable elements and their hosts interact in the 'genomic ecosystem' (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: A report on the Keystone Symposium "Transposition and other genome rearrangements", Santa Fe, USA, 8-14 February 2003.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Box B111, 4200 E, Ninth Avenue, Denver, CO 80262, USA. Sandy.Martin@UCHSC.edu

ABSTRACT
A report on the Keystone Symposium "Transposition and other genome rearrangements", Santa Fe, USA, 8-14 February 2003.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus