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Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair: monitoring its success by magnetic resonance imaging and histology.

Roberts S, McCall IW, Darby AJ, Menage J, Evans H, Harrison PE, Richardson JB - Arthritis Res. Ther. (2002)

Bottom Line: It was of varying morphology ranging from predominantly hyaline in 22% of biopsy specimens, mixed in 48%, through to predominantly fibrocartilage, in 30%, apparently improving with increasing time postgraft.MRI scans provide a useful assessment of properties of the whole graft area and adjacent tissue and is a noninvasive technique for long-term follow-up.It correlated with histology (P = 0.02) in patients treated with ACI alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Spinal Studies, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Oswestry, Shropshire, UK. s.roberts@keele.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Autologous chondrocyte implantation is being used increasingly for the treatment of cartilage defects. In spite of this, there has been a paucity of objective, standardised assessment of the outcome and quality of repair tissue formed. We have investigated patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), some in conjunction with mosaicplasty, and developed objective, semiquantitative scoring schemes to monitor the repair tissue using MRI and histology. Results indicate repair tissue to be on average 2.5 mm thick. It was of varying morphology ranging from predominantly hyaline in 22% of biopsy specimens, mixed in 48%, through to predominantly fibrocartilage, in 30%, apparently improving with increasing time postgraft. Repair tissue was well integrated with the host tissue in all aspects viewed. MRI scans provide a useful assessment of properties of the whole graft area and adjacent tissue and is a noninvasive technique for long-term follow-up. It correlated with histology (P = 0.02) in patients treated with ACI alone.

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Typical staining and immunostaining patterns for control cartilage. Haematoxylin and eosin (a), type II collagen (b), type I collagen in the surface zone (c) and the deep zone (d) and type X collagen (e). B, bone; CC, calcified cartilage.
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Figure 8: Typical staining and immunostaining patterns for control cartilage. Haematoxylin and eosin (a), type II collagen (b), type I collagen in the surface zone (c) and the deep zone (d) and type X collagen (e). B, bone; CC, calcified cartilage.

Mentions: Hyaline 'control' cartilage was immunopositive virtually throughout for type II collagen, negative regions, if any, being restricted to a very thin strip (<50 μm) at the surface and the underlying bone (Fig. 8). The opposite was true for type I collagen, being negative apart from the bone and sometimes a very thin layer at the surface (see Fig. 8). Staining for types III and VI collagens was cell-associated and for type X collagen was restricted to the deep zone and tidemark, except in sample 24, which had slight staining in the upper surface zone. The glycosaminoglycan epitopes that stained most strongly were keratan sulfate and chondroitin-4-sulfate. Less staining was seen for chondroitin-6-sulfate, with very slight staining for the unusually sulfated epitope, demonstrated with 7-D-4. The meniscus, in contrast, had much staining for types I and III collagens, patchy staining for type II collagen, and a little for type VI collagen. Most glycosaminoglycan staining was for chondroitin-4-sulfate, with less for keratan sulfate than other samples, and no staining with antibodies 3-B-3(-) or 7-D-4 present.


Autologous chondrocyte implantation for cartilage repair: monitoring its success by magnetic resonance imaging and histology.

Roberts S, McCall IW, Darby AJ, Menage J, Evans H, Harrison PE, Richardson JB - Arthritis Res. Ther. (2002)

Typical staining and immunostaining patterns for control cartilage. Haematoxylin and eosin (a), type II collagen (b), type I collagen in the surface zone (c) and the deep zone (d) and type X collagen (e). B, bone; CC, calcified cartilage.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC154433&req=5

Figure 8: Typical staining and immunostaining patterns for control cartilage. Haematoxylin and eosin (a), type II collagen (b), type I collagen in the surface zone (c) and the deep zone (d) and type X collagen (e). B, bone; CC, calcified cartilage.
Mentions: Hyaline 'control' cartilage was immunopositive virtually throughout for type II collagen, negative regions, if any, being restricted to a very thin strip (<50 μm) at the surface and the underlying bone (Fig. 8). The opposite was true for type I collagen, being negative apart from the bone and sometimes a very thin layer at the surface (see Fig. 8). Staining for types III and VI collagens was cell-associated and for type X collagen was restricted to the deep zone and tidemark, except in sample 24, which had slight staining in the upper surface zone. The glycosaminoglycan epitopes that stained most strongly were keratan sulfate and chondroitin-4-sulfate. Less staining was seen for chondroitin-6-sulfate, with very slight staining for the unusually sulfated epitope, demonstrated with 7-D-4. The meniscus, in contrast, had much staining for types I and III collagens, patchy staining for type II collagen, and a little for type VI collagen. Most glycosaminoglycan staining was for chondroitin-4-sulfate, with less for keratan sulfate than other samples, and no staining with antibodies 3-B-3(-) or 7-D-4 present.

Bottom Line: It was of varying morphology ranging from predominantly hyaline in 22% of biopsy specimens, mixed in 48%, through to predominantly fibrocartilage, in 30%, apparently improving with increasing time postgraft.MRI scans provide a useful assessment of properties of the whole graft area and adjacent tissue and is a noninvasive technique for long-term follow-up.It correlated with histology (P = 0.02) in patients treated with ACI alone.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Spinal Studies, Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Oswestry, Shropshire, UK. s.roberts@keele.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Autologous chondrocyte implantation is being used increasingly for the treatment of cartilage defects. In spite of this, there has been a paucity of objective, standardised assessment of the outcome and quality of repair tissue formed. We have investigated patients treated with autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), some in conjunction with mosaicplasty, and developed objective, semiquantitative scoring schemes to monitor the repair tissue using MRI and histology. Results indicate repair tissue to be on average 2.5 mm thick. It was of varying morphology ranging from predominantly hyaline in 22% of biopsy specimens, mixed in 48%, through to predominantly fibrocartilage, in 30%, apparently improving with increasing time postgraft. Repair tissue was well integrated with the host tissue in all aspects viewed. MRI scans provide a useful assessment of properties of the whole graft area and adjacent tissue and is a noninvasive technique for long-term follow-up. It correlated with histology (P = 0.02) in patients treated with ACI alone.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus