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Beenomes to Bombyx: future directions in applied insect genomics.

Evans JD, Gundersen-Rindal D - Genome Biol. (2003)

Bottom Line: The recent sequencing of the Anopheles gambiae genome showcases the genetic breadth of insects and a trend towards sequencing organisms directly involved with human welfare.We describe traits in other insect species that make them important candidates for genomics projects, and review several recent workshops aimed at uniting researchers working with insect species to efficiently address problems in medicine, biotechnology, and agriculture.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS Bee Research Lab, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. evansj@ba.ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
The recent sequencing of the Anopheles gambiae genome showcases the genetic breadth of insects and a trend towards sequencing organisms directly involved with human welfare. We describe traits in other insect species that make them important candidates for genomics projects, and review several recent workshops aimed at uniting researchers working with insect species to efficiently address problems in medicine, biotechnology, and agriculture.

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Phylogenetic tree of insect orders, after Wheeler et al.  [3]. Light gray, Archaeognatha (primitive wingless insects); Dark gray, Paleoptera (primitive winged insects); Black, Neoptera (higher insects). Crustacea are shown as an arthropod outgroup. Thysanura include silverfish; Odonata, dragonflies; Orthoptera, grasshoppers and crickets; Phasmida, stick insects; Blattaria, roaches; Heteroptera, true bugs; Homoptera, aphids, scales and tree hoppers; Coleoptera, beetles; Hymenoptera, ants, bees and wasps; Lepidoptera, moths and butterflies; and Diptera, flies.
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Figure 1: Phylogenetic tree of insect orders, after Wheeler et al. [3]. Light gray, Archaeognatha (primitive wingless insects); Dark gray, Paleoptera (primitive winged insects); Black, Neoptera (higher insects). Crustacea are shown as an arthropod outgroup. Thysanura include silverfish; Odonata, dragonflies; Orthoptera, grasshoppers and crickets; Phasmida, stick insects; Blattaria, roaches; Heteroptera, true bugs; Homoptera, aphids, scales and tree hoppers; Coleoptera, beetles; Hymenoptera, ants, bees and wasps; Lepidoptera, moths and butterflies; and Diptera, flies.

Mentions: Given limited time and funding, robust criteria must be developed by which to weigh insect species as new sequencing candidates. One obvious goal is taxonomic breadth, and the eventual completion of full genome sequences from members representing the three major insect clades (Figure 1[3]) will be an essential contribution to comparative genomics. Taxonomic breadth by itself is not a sufficient criterion for comparing sequencing candidates, however. Full genome sequences from multiple species of Drosophila, for example, can complement each other by clarifying gene function and organization in this well-studied genus, and by extrapolation in insects in general. Furthermore, multiple candidates within the same insect order may warrant sequencing on the basis of other criteria: for example, within the order Diptera are mosquitoes, Drosophila and the economically important tephritid fly Ceratitis capitata.


Beenomes to Bombyx: future directions in applied insect genomics.

Evans JD, Gundersen-Rindal D - Genome Biol. (2003)

Phylogenetic tree of insect orders, after Wheeler et al.  [3]. Light gray, Archaeognatha (primitive wingless insects); Dark gray, Paleoptera (primitive winged insects); Black, Neoptera (higher insects). Crustacea are shown as an arthropod outgroup. Thysanura include silverfish; Odonata, dragonflies; Orthoptera, grasshoppers and crickets; Phasmida, stick insects; Blattaria, roaches; Heteroptera, true bugs; Homoptera, aphids, scales and tree hoppers; Coleoptera, beetles; Hymenoptera, ants, bees and wasps; Lepidoptera, moths and butterflies; and Diptera, flies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC153451&req=5

Figure 1: Phylogenetic tree of insect orders, after Wheeler et al. [3]. Light gray, Archaeognatha (primitive wingless insects); Dark gray, Paleoptera (primitive winged insects); Black, Neoptera (higher insects). Crustacea are shown as an arthropod outgroup. Thysanura include silverfish; Odonata, dragonflies; Orthoptera, grasshoppers and crickets; Phasmida, stick insects; Blattaria, roaches; Heteroptera, true bugs; Homoptera, aphids, scales and tree hoppers; Coleoptera, beetles; Hymenoptera, ants, bees and wasps; Lepidoptera, moths and butterflies; and Diptera, flies.
Mentions: Given limited time and funding, robust criteria must be developed by which to weigh insect species as new sequencing candidates. One obvious goal is taxonomic breadth, and the eventual completion of full genome sequences from members representing the three major insect clades (Figure 1[3]) will be an essential contribution to comparative genomics. Taxonomic breadth by itself is not a sufficient criterion for comparing sequencing candidates, however. Full genome sequences from multiple species of Drosophila, for example, can complement each other by clarifying gene function and organization in this well-studied genus, and by extrapolation in insects in general. Furthermore, multiple candidates within the same insect order may warrant sequencing on the basis of other criteria: for example, within the order Diptera are mosquitoes, Drosophila and the economically important tephritid fly Ceratitis capitata.

Bottom Line: The recent sequencing of the Anopheles gambiae genome showcases the genetic breadth of insects and a trend towards sequencing organisms directly involved with human welfare.We describe traits in other insect species that make them important candidates for genomics projects, and review several recent workshops aimed at uniting researchers working with insect species to efficiently address problems in medicine, biotechnology, and agriculture.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS Bee Research Lab, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. evansj@ba.ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
The recent sequencing of the Anopheles gambiae genome showcases the genetic breadth of insects and a trend towards sequencing organisms directly involved with human welfare. We describe traits in other insect species that make them important candidates for genomics projects, and review several recent workshops aimed at uniting researchers working with insect species to efficiently address problems in medicine, biotechnology, and agriculture.

Show MeSH