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Geographic boundaries in breast, lung and colorectal cancers in relation to exposure to air toxics in Long Island, New York.

Jacquez GM, Greiling DA - Int J Health Geogr (2003)

Bottom Line: In this second paper, we compare patterns in standardized morbidity ratios (SMR values), calculated from New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) data, to geographic patterns in overall predicted risk (OPR) from air toxics using exposures estimated in the USEPA National Air Toxics Assessment database.RESULTS: We identified significant geographic boundaries in SMR and OPR.We found little or no association between the SMR of colorectal and breast cancers and the OPR for each cancer from exposure to the air toxics.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: TerraSeer, Inc, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. dunrie@biomedware.com

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: This two-part study employs several statistical techniques to evaluate the geographic distribution of breast cancer in females and colorectal and lung cancers in males and females in Nassau, Queens, and Suffolk counties, New York, USA. In this second paper, we compare patterns in standardized morbidity ratios (SMR values), calculated from New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) data, to geographic patterns in overall predicted risk (OPR) from air toxics using exposures estimated in the USEPA National Air Toxics Assessment database. RESULTS: We identified significant geographic boundaries in SMR and OPR. We found little or no association between the SMR of colorectal and breast cancers and the OPR for each cancer from exposure to the air toxics. We did find boundaries in male and female lung cancer SMR and boundaries in lung cancer OPR to be closer to one another than expected. CONCLUSION: While consistent with a causal relationship between air toxics and lung cancer incidence, the boundary analysis does not demonstrate the existence of a causal relationship. However, now that the areas of overlap between boundaries in lung cancer incidence and potential airborne exposures have been identified, we can begin to evaluate local- as well as large-scale determinants of lung cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographic distribution of overall predicted risk (OPR) for breast cancer. The turquoise fill indicates the OPR for each census tract (outlined in gray). Darker regions have higher OPR than lighter regions. The boundaries in breast cancer OPR are shown in dark green.
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Figure 8: Geographic distribution of overall predicted risk (OPR) for breast cancer. The turquoise fill indicates the OPR for each census tract (outlined in gray). Darker regions have higher OPR than lighter regions. The boundaries in breast cancer OPR are shown in dark green.

Mentions: The overall predicted risk (OPR) for breast cancer was calculated from the NATA data set and mapped (Figure 8). We see a broad area of moderate to low overall predicted risk extending from west central to far eastern Long Island. Areas of moderate to high overall predicted risk are found in the western urban areas, especially in the vicinity of East Elmhurst, Maspeth, Long Island City and Little Neck in Flushing.


Geographic boundaries in breast, lung and colorectal cancers in relation to exposure to air toxics in Long Island, New York.

Jacquez GM, Greiling DA - Int J Health Geogr (2003)

Geographic distribution of overall predicted risk (OPR) for breast cancer. The turquoise fill indicates the OPR for each census tract (outlined in gray). Darker regions have higher OPR than lighter regions. The boundaries in breast cancer OPR are shown in dark green.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC151677&req=5

Figure 8: Geographic distribution of overall predicted risk (OPR) for breast cancer. The turquoise fill indicates the OPR for each census tract (outlined in gray). Darker regions have higher OPR than lighter regions. The boundaries in breast cancer OPR are shown in dark green.
Mentions: The overall predicted risk (OPR) for breast cancer was calculated from the NATA data set and mapped (Figure 8). We see a broad area of moderate to low overall predicted risk extending from west central to far eastern Long Island. Areas of moderate to high overall predicted risk are found in the western urban areas, especially in the vicinity of East Elmhurst, Maspeth, Long Island City and Little Neck in Flushing.

Bottom Line: In this second paper, we compare patterns in standardized morbidity ratios (SMR values), calculated from New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) data, to geographic patterns in overall predicted risk (OPR) from air toxics using exposures estimated in the USEPA National Air Toxics Assessment database.RESULTS: We identified significant geographic boundaries in SMR and OPR.We found little or no association between the SMR of colorectal and breast cancers and the OPR for each cancer from exposure to the air toxics.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: TerraSeer, Inc, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. dunrie@biomedware.com

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: This two-part study employs several statistical techniques to evaluate the geographic distribution of breast cancer in females and colorectal and lung cancers in males and females in Nassau, Queens, and Suffolk counties, New York, USA. In this second paper, we compare patterns in standardized morbidity ratios (SMR values), calculated from New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) data, to geographic patterns in overall predicted risk (OPR) from air toxics using exposures estimated in the USEPA National Air Toxics Assessment database. RESULTS: We identified significant geographic boundaries in SMR and OPR. We found little or no association between the SMR of colorectal and breast cancers and the OPR for each cancer from exposure to the air toxics. We did find boundaries in male and female lung cancer SMR and boundaries in lung cancer OPR to be closer to one another than expected. CONCLUSION: While consistent with a causal relationship between air toxics and lung cancer incidence, the boundary analysis does not demonstrate the existence of a causal relationship. However, now that the areas of overlap between boundaries in lung cancer incidence and potential airborne exposures have been identified, we can begin to evaluate local- as well as large-scale determinants of lung cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus