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The use of interactive graphical maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources.

Boulos MN - Int J Health Geogr (2003)

Bottom Line: As online information portals accumulate metadata descriptions of Web resources, it becomes necessary to develop effective ways for visualising and navigating the resultant huge metadata repositories as well as the different semantic relationships and attributes of described Web resources.Graphical maps provide a good method to visualise, understand and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly like the Web.Associative and pictorial map icons that enable instant recognition and comprehension are preferred to geometric ones and are key to successful maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Measurement and Information in Medicine, City University, London EC1V 0HB, UK. mkamel@medicad.com

ABSTRACT
As online information portals accumulate metadata descriptions of Web resources, it becomes necessary to develop effective ways for visualising and navigating the resultant huge metadata repositories as well as the different semantic relationships and attributes of described Web resources. Graphical maps provide a good method to visualise, understand and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly like the Web. Several examples of maps designed as a navigational aid for Web resources are presented in this review with an emphasis on maps of medical and health-related resources. The latter include HealthCyberMap maps http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org/, which can be classified as conceptual information space maps, and the very abstract and geometric Visual Net maps of PubMed http://pubmed.antarcti.ca/start. Information resources can be also organised and navigated based on their geographic attributes. Some of the maps presented in this review use a Kohonen Self-Organising Map algorithm, and only HealthCyberMap uses a Geographic Information System to classify Web resource data and render the maps. Maps based on familiar metaphors taken from users' everyday life are much easier to understand. Associative and pictorial map icons that enable instant recognition and comprehension are preferred to geometric ones and are key to successful maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D. Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D . Users are essentially "walking" on the ground, among buildings that represent Web sites. Map.Net 3D requires a special plug-in to be downloaded and installed first.
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Figure 12: Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D. Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D . Users are essentially "walking" on the ground, among buildings that represent Web sites. Map.Net 3D requires a special plug-in to be downloaded and installed first.

Mentions: Visual Net mapping technology has been developed by Antarcti.ca and aims at rendering computer networks in the form of 2D and 3D maps. Antarcti.ca used Visual Net technology in Map.Net – (Figures 1 and 12) to provide multilevel (hierarchical/categorical) information maps for browsing over two million Web sites from the Open Directory Project . Rather than using conventional search engine technology to navigate the Web (or indeed any other hierarchical information space), Visual Net creates a landscape that spatially represents relationships between data, though in a very abstract, geometric fashion. Antarcti.ca also applied Visual Net technology to PubMed, the US National Library of Medicine (NLM) well-known database of citations ( – Figure 2 – see also Figures 8 and 9).


The use of interactive graphical maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources.

Boulos MN - Int J Health Geogr (2003)

Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D. Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D . Users are essentially "walking" on the ground, among buildings that represent Web sites. Map.Net 3D requires a special plug-in to be downloaded and installed first.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC149401&req=5

Figure 12: Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D. Screenshot showing some UK health resources in Map.Net 3D . Users are essentially "walking" on the ground, among buildings that represent Web sites. Map.Net 3D requires a special plug-in to be downloaded and installed first.
Mentions: Visual Net mapping technology has been developed by Antarcti.ca and aims at rendering computer networks in the form of 2D and 3D maps. Antarcti.ca used Visual Net technology in Map.Net – (Figures 1 and 12) to provide multilevel (hierarchical/categorical) information maps for browsing over two million Web sites from the Open Directory Project . Rather than using conventional search engine technology to navigate the Web (or indeed any other hierarchical information space), Visual Net creates a landscape that spatially represents relationships between data, though in a very abstract, geometric fashion. Antarcti.ca also applied Visual Net technology to PubMed, the US National Library of Medicine (NLM) well-known database of citations ( – Figure 2 – see also Figures 8 and 9).

Bottom Line: As online information portals accumulate metadata descriptions of Web resources, it becomes necessary to develop effective ways for visualising and navigating the resultant huge metadata repositories as well as the different semantic relationships and attributes of described Web resources.Graphical maps provide a good method to visualise, understand and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly like the Web.Associative and pictorial map icons that enable instant recognition and comprehension are preferred to geometric ones and are key to successful maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Measurement and Information in Medicine, City University, London EC1V 0HB, UK. mkamel@medicad.com

ABSTRACT
As online information portals accumulate metadata descriptions of Web resources, it becomes necessary to develop effective ways for visualising and navigating the resultant huge metadata repositories as well as the different semantic relationships and attributes of described Web resources. Graphical maps provide a good method to visualise, understand and navigate a world that is too large and complex to be seen directly like the Web. Several examples of maps designed as a navigational aid for Web resources are presented in this review with an emphasis on maps of medical and health-related resources. The latter include HealthCyberMap maps http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org/, which can be classified as conceptual information space maps, and the very abstract and geometric Visual Net maps of PubMed http://pubmed.antarcti.ca/start. Information resources can be also organised and navigated based on their geographic attributes. Some of the maps presented in this review use a Kohonen Self-Organising Map algorithm, and only HealthCyberMap uses a Geographic Information System to classify Web resource data and render the maps. Maps based on familiar metaphors taken from users' everyday life are much easier to understand. Associative and pictorial map icons that enable instant recognition and comprehension are preferred to geometric ones and are key to successful maps for browsing medical/health Internet information resources.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus