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Chain of care development in Sweden: results of a national study.

Ahgren B - Int J Integr Care (2003)

Bottom Line: Despite support in the form of goals and activity plans, seven out of ten county councils are uncertain whether they have been quite successful in the development work.Although one of the main purposes is to make health care more patient-focused, patients in general seem to have limited impact on the development work.Therefore, the challenge is to design Chains of Care, which regards patients as partners instead of objects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bohlin & Strömberg, a Solving International Company, Box 4179, SE-203 13 Malmö, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Chains of Care are today an important counterbalance to the ever-increasing fragmentation of Swedish health care, and the ongoing development work has high priority. Improved quality of care is the most important reason for developing Chains of Care. Despite support in the form of goals and activity plans, seven out of ten county councils are uncertain whether they have been quite successful in the development work. Strong departmentalisation of responsibilities between different medical professions and departments, types of responsibilities and power still remaining in the vertical organisation structure, together with limited participation from the local authorities, are some of the most commonly mentioned reasons for the lack of success. Even though there is hesitation regarding the development work up to today, all county councils will continue developing Chains of Care. The main reason is, as was the case with Chain of Care development up to today, to improve quality of care. Although one of the main purposes is to make health care more patient-focused, patients in general seem to have limited impact on the development work. Therefore, the challenge is to design Chains of Care, which regards patients as partners instead of objects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of developed Chains of Care per county council during the last five years.
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fg001: Number of developed Chains of Care per county council during the last five years.

Mentions: Over half of the county councils have developed 1–10 Chains of Care during the last five years (see Figure 1). County councils with the shortest experience of Chain of Care development, i.e. when goals, activity plans, etc. are at most two years old, all belong to this category. The group of county councils that only have developed up to ten Chains of Care are also represented by those who have prioritised Chains of Care for more than five years. The fact that some “old-timers” have developed only a relatively small amount of Chains of Care is explained by the respondents mainly as “lack of knowledge and understanding of the importance of co-ordinating health care activities carried out in units outside one's own”. In other words despite the support by goals and activity plans, development work in reality has a low priority. In three county councils the development efforts have not yet led to the establishment of Chains of Care. Instead the focus has been on elaborating forms for general collaboration with health care providers in the local authorities and drawing up guidelines for care collaboration.


Chain of care development in Sweden: results of a national study.

Ahgren B - Int J Integr Care (2003)

Number of developed Chains of Care per county council during the last five years.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1483939&req=5

fg001: Number of developed Chains of Care per county council during the last five years.
Mentions: Over half of the county councils have developed 1–10 Chains of Care during the last five years (see Figure 1). County councils with the shortest experience of Chain of Care development, i.e. when goals, activity plans, etc. are at most two years old, all belong to this category. The group of county councils that only have developed up to ten Chains of Care are also represented by those who have prioritised Chains of Care for more than five years. The fact that some “old-timers” have developed only a relatively small amount of Chains of Care is explained by the respondents mainly as “lack of knowledge and understanding of the importance of co-ordinating health care activities carried out in units outside one's own”. In other words despite the support by goals and activity plans, development work in reality has a low priority. In three county councils the development efforts have not yet led to the establishment of Chains of Care. Instead the focus has been on elaborating forms for general collaboration with health care providers in the local authorities and drawing up guidelines for care collaboration.

Bottom Line: Despite support in the form of goals and activity plans, seven out of ten county councils are uncertain whether they have been quite successful in the development work.Although one of the main purposes is to make health care more patient-focused, patients in general seem to have limited impact on the development work.Therefore, the challenge is to design Chains of Care, which regards patients as partners instead of objects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bohlin & Strömberg, a Solving International Company, Box 4179, SE-203 13 Malmö, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Chains of Care are today an important counterbalance to the ever-increasing fragmentation of Swedish health care, and the ongoing development work has high priority. Improved quality of care is the most important reason for developing Chains of Care. Despite support in the form of goals and activity plans, seven out of ten county councils are uncertain whether they have been quite successful in the development work. Strong departmentalisation of responsibilities between different medical professions and departments, types of responsibilities and power still remaining in the vertical organisation structure, together with limited participation from the local authorities, are some of the most commonly mentioned reasons for the lack of success. Even though there is hesitation regarding the development work up to today, all county councils will continue developing Chains of Care. The main reason is, as was the case with Chain of Care development up to today, to improve quality of care. Although one of the main purposes is to make health care more patient-focused, patients in general seem to have limited impact on the development work. Therefore, the challenge is to design Chains of Care, which regards patients as partners instead of objects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus