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Fed Up! Winning the War Against Childhood Obesity

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Examining the origins of the obesity epidemic, Susan Okie, a family physician and journalist, covers the distance between the “toxic environment” and the family... Sodas, juice, portions, fast food, television, school lunches, and sedentary lifestyles are all environmental factors that parents and families must confront in their efforts to stop the obesity epidemic... Okie emphasizes that obesity is a family problem: “preventing unhealthy weight gain in American children will require adults to make profound changes in many of their own choices about diet, activity, and lifestyle. ” Taking a detailed look at nutrition, Okie describes the rationale for a balanced diet, the dangers of fast food, and the slippery slope of increasing portion sizes, giving parents and families a clear picture of what has gone wrong in children’s nutritional environment... Likewise, a robust discussion of television provides evidence that decreased activity and increased snacking occurs when children and adolescents spend too much time in front of the screen... One example discussed is “school gardens and greenhouses, student-run fruit and vegetable stands, and farm-to-school programs,” such as the Berkeley, California, Edible Schoolyard... In the strong chapter “Action for Healthy Communities,” Okie recommends community activities including political action to improve school environments and derail food marketing to children, the creation of safe play spaces in the community, and improved food choices in local markets... Such ideas give parents the beginning of an agenda for change... Fed Up! is clear that “teaching children to make choices that add up to a healthier lifestyle requires a degree of sophistication that simply was not necessary for parents in the past. ” This book will help parents and families close that gap and directs parents to look at their families, schools, communities, and beyond to improve the health of their children.

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Fed Up! Winning the War Against Childhood Obesity
© Copyright Policy - public-domain
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC1459963&req=5

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Examining the origins of the obesity epidemic, Susan Okie, a family physician and journalist, covers the distance between the “toxic environment” and the family... Sodas, juice, portions, fast food, television, school lunches, and sedentary lifestyles are all environmental factors that parents and families must confront in their efforts to stop the obesity epidemic... Okie emphasizes that obesity is a family problem: “preventing unhealthy weight gain in American children will require adults to make profound changes in many of their own choices about diet, activity, and lifestyle. ” Taking a detailed look at nutrition, Okie describes the rationale for a balanced diet, the dangers of fast food, and the slippery slope of increasing portion sizes, giving parents and families a clear picture of what has gone wrong in children’s nutritional environment... Likewise, a robust discussion of television provides evidence that decreased activity and increased snacking occurs when children and adolescents spend too much time in front of the screen... One example discussed is “school gardens and greenhouses, student-run fruit and vegetable stands, and farm-to-school programs,” such as the Berkeley, California, Edible Schoolyard... In the strong chapter “Action for Healthy Communities,” Okie recommends community activities including political action to improve school environments and derail food marketing to children, the creation of safe play spaces in the community, and improved food choices in local markets... Such ideas give parents the beginning of an agenda for change... Fed Up! is clear that “teaching children to make choices that add up to a healthier lifestyle requires a degree of sophistication that simply was not necessary for parents in the past. ” This book will help parents and families close that gap and directs parents to look at their families, schools, communities, and beyond to improve the health of their children.

No MeSH data available.