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Critical care medicine in the 21st century: from CPR to PCR.

Villar J, Méndez S, Slutsky AS - Crit Care (2001)

Bottom Line: The foundations of molecular biology and genetics are essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of disease.Incorporating molecular biology techniques in the research arsenal of the intensivist will provide the opportunity to dissect out and define the reversible and irreversible intracellular processes giving rise to the major causes of mortality in intensive care units.Two historical paradigms, the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and polymerase chain reaction, summarize how critical care medicine began, and how it could mature in the years to come.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute, Hospital de la Candelaria, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. jvillar@hcan.rcanaria.es

ABSTRACT
As in other areas of medicine, the specialty of critical care medicine, which has made important contributions in the pathophysiology of critical illness, is facing challenges that must be recognized and addressed in the current century. In this review, we argue that the skill set required to adequately treat critically ill patients will also require knowledge of molecular biology for better diagnosis and treatment. The foundations of molecular biology and genetics are essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Incorporating molecular biology techniques in the research arsenal of the intensivist will provide the opportunity to dissect out and define the reversible and irreversible intracellular processes giving rise to the major causes of mortality in intensive care units. Two historical paradigms, the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and polymerase chain reaction, summarize how critical care medicine began, and how it could mature in the years to come.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A network of networks between cytokines and other regulatory factors. IL, Interleukin; NF, nuclear factor; NOS, nitric oxide synthase; PMN, neutrophils; ROS, reactive oxygen species; RT-PCR, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction.
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Figure 1: A network of networks between cytokines and other regulatory factors. IL, Interleukin; NF, nuclear factor; NOS, nitric oxide synthase; PMN, neutrophils; ROS, reactive oxygen species; RT-PCR, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction.

Mentions: DNA, mRNA or proteins can be extracted from the lung or any tissue or cell population using standard biochemical techniques. In conjunction with PCR technology, we can assess the relevance of altered gene transcription and translation to given physiological and pathological states. Epithelial and endothelial cells respond to lung injury with acute alterations in mediator generation and surface molecule expression, and appear to act in concert with inflammatory cells to influence the lung tissue response to injury and inflammatory stimuli. These interactions are in turn known to induce the expression of various genes encoding proteins central to coagulation, fibrinolysis, and repair. The influence of these molecules on a particular cell or cell population may be influenced greatly by interactions with cytokines and other types of regulatory factors (Fig. 1).


Critical care medicine in the 21st century: from CPR to PCR.

Villar J, Méndez S, Slutsky AS - Crit Care (2001)

A network of networks between cytokines and other regulatory factors. IL, Interleukin; NF, nuclear factor; NOS, nitric oxide synthase; PMN, neutrophils; ROS, reactive oxygen species; RT-PCR, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC137272&req=5

Figure 1: A network of networks between cytokines and other regulatory factors. IL, Interleukin; NF, nuclear factor; NOS, nitric oxide synthase; PMN, neutrophils; ROS, reactive oxygen species; RT-PCR, reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction.
Mentions: DNA, mRNA or proteins can be extracted from the lung or any tissue or cell population using standard biochemical techniques. In conjunction with PCR technology, we can assess the relevance of altered gene transcription and translation to given physiological and pathological states. Epithelial and endothelial cells respond to lung injury with acute alterations in mediator generation and surface molecule expression, and appear to act in concert with inflammatory cells to influence the lung tissue response to injury and inflammatory stimuli. These interactions are in turn known to induce the expression of various genes encoding proteins central to coagulation, fibrinolysis, and repair. The influence of these molecules on a particular cell or cell population may be influenced greatly by interactions with cytokines and other types of regulatory factors (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The foundations of molecular biology and genetics are essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of disease.Incorporating molecular biology techniques in the research arsenal of the intensivist will provide the opportunity to dissect out and define the reversible and irreversible intracellular processes giving rise to the major causes of mortality in intensive care units.Two historical paradigms, the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and polymerase chain reaction, summarize how critical care medicine began, and how it could mature in the years to come.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Institute, Hospital de la Candelaria, Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. jvillar@hcan.rcanaria.es

ABSTRACT
As in other areas of medicine, the specialty of critical care medicine, which has made important contributions in the pathophysiology of critical illness, is facing challenges that must be recognized and addressed in the current century. In this review, we argue that the skill set required to adequately treat critically ill patients will also require knowledge of molecular biology for better diagnosis and treatment. The foundations of molecular biology and genetics are essential for the understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Incorporating molecular biology techniques in the research arsenal of the intensivist will provide the opportunity to dissect out and define the reversible and irreversible intracellular processes giving rise to the major causes of mortality in intensive care units. Two historical paradigms, the cardiopulmonary resuscitation and polymerase chain reaction, summarize how critical care medicine began, and how it could mature in the years to come.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus