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Understanding gastrointestinal perfusion in critical care: so near, and yet so far.

Ackland G, Grocott MP, Mythen MG - Crit Care (2000)

Bottom Line: Much of the data to support this idea comes from studies using gastric tonometry.Furthermore, current understanding of the physiology of gastrointestinal perfusion in health and disease is incomplete.This review considers critically the striking clinical data and basic physiological investigations that support a key role for gastrointestinal hypoperfusion in initiating and/or perpetuating critical disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Anaesthesia, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
An association between abnormal gastrointestinal perfusion and critical illness has been suggested for a number of years. Much of the data to support this idea comes from studies using gastric tonometry. Although an attractive technology, the interpretation of tonometry data is complex. Furthermore, current understanding of the physiology of gastrointestinal perfusion in health and disease is incomplete. This review considers critically the striking clinical data and basic physiological investigations that support a key role for gastrointestinal hypoperfusion in initiating and/or perpetuating critical disease.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Tonometry in the stomach. CO2 diffuses into the gastric tonometer balloon.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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Figure 2: Tonometry in the stomach. CO2 diffuses into the gastric tonometer balloon.

Mentions: The only practical technique for assessing gastrointestinal perfusion that has entered clinical practise is gastrointestinal tonometry for the measurement of gut intraluminal CO2 (Fig. 2). It is worth at this point exploring the relationship between gastrointestinal intraluminal CO2 and blood flow.


Understanding gastrointestinal perfusion in critical care: so near, and yet so far.

Ackland G, Grocott MP, Mythen MG - Crit Care (2000)

Tonometry in the stomach. CO2 diffuses into the gastric tonometer balloon.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC137256&req=5

Figure 2: Tonometry in the stomach. CO2 diffuses into the gastric tonometer balloon.
Mentions: The only practical technique for assessing gastrointestinal perfusion that has entered clinical practise is gastrointestinal tonometry for the measurement of gut intraluminal CO2 (Fig. 2). It is worth at this point exploring the relationship between gastrointestinal intraluminal CO2 and blood flow.

Bottom Line: Much of the data to support this idea comes from studies using gastric tonometry.Furthermore, current understanding of the physiology of gastrointestinal perfusion in health and disease is incomplete.This review considers critically the striking clinical data and basic physiological investigations that support a key role for gastrointestinal hypoperfusion in initiating and/or perpetuating critical disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Anaesthesia, University College London, London, UK.

ABSTRACT
An association between abnormal gastrointestinal perfusion and critical illness has been suggested for a number of years. Much of the data to support this idea comes from studies using gastric tonometry. Although an attractive technology, the interpretation of tonometry data is complex. Furthermore, current understanding of the physiology of gastrointestinal perfusion in health and disease is incomplete. This review considers critically the striking clinical data and basic physiological investigations that support a key role for gastrointestinal hypoperfusion in initiating and/or perpetuating critical disease.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus