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A simple method for serving Web hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down.

Boulos MN, Roudsari AV, Carson ER - Int J Health Geogr (2002)

Bottom Line: WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps.This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web.CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Measurement and Information in Medicine, School of Informatics, City University, London EC1V 0HB, UK. M.Nabih-Kamel-Boulos@city.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: HealthCyberMap http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org aims at mapping parts of health information cyberspace in novel ways to deliver a semantically superior user experience. This is achieved through "intelligent" categorisation and interactive hypermedia visualisation of health resources using metadata, clinical codes and GIS. HealthCyberMap is an ArcView 3.1 project. WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps. The basic WebView set-up does not support any GIS database connection, and published Web maps become disconnected from the original project. A dedicated Internet map server would be the best way to serve HealthCyberMap database-driven interactive Web maps, but is an expensive and complex solution to acquire, run and maintain. This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web. RESULTS: The proposed solution is currently used for publishing HealthCyberMap GIS-generated navigational information maps on the Web while maintaining their links with the underlying resource metadata base. CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance. It should be also possible to use the same solution to publish other interactive GIS-driven maps on the Web, e.g., maps of real world health problems.

No MeSH data available.


Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel (only accessible by server administrator). The same Microsoft® Access database we are connecting to in ArcView (HCM.MDB) is shown registered on HCM server (a Windows 2000/NT 5 IIS Server) as an ODBC Data Source.
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Figure 9: Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel (only accessible by server administrator). The same Microsoft® Access database we are connecting to in ArcView (HCM.MDB) is shown registered on HCM server (a Windows 2000/NT 5 IIS Server) as an ODBC Data Source.

Mentions: In HCM, the authors developed their own (partial) workarounds for these limitations of WebView (Figure 8). This solution makes use of WebView HotLink functionality to implement a dynamic database drill-down that will always reflect the latest updates to this database. By clicking different hotspots on the client-side imagemaps in HCM, users are actually triggering server-side pre-formulated SQL (Structured Query Language) queries against an underlying database of resource metadata. The database is registered on HCM server (a Windows 2000/NT 5 IIS Server – Microsoft Internet Information Server/Services) as an ODBC (Open DataBase Connectivity) Data Source (Figure 9) and is the same database we are connecting to in ArcView. We coded the SQL queries in ASP (Active Server Pages) pages for execution on the server. The ASP pages returned to users in their browsers only contain query results in the form of formatted HTML. The actual SQL and ASP code as found in the ASP pages stored on the server is never sent to the end user.


A simple method for serving Web hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down.

Boulos MN, Roudsari AV, Carson ER - Int J Health Geogr (2002)

Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel (only accessible by server administrator). The same Microsoft® Access database we are connecting to in ArcView (HCM.MDB) is shown registered on HCM server (a Windows 2000/NT 5 IIS Server) as an ODBC Data Source.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC131013&req=5

Figure 9: Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel Screenshot of HCM Web Server Control Panel (only accessible by server administrator). The same Microsoft® Access database we are connecting to in ArcView (HCM.MDB) is shown registered on HCM server (a Windows 2000/NT 5 IIS Server) as an ODBC Data Source.
Mentions: In HCM, the authors developed their own (partial) workarounds for these limitations of WebView (Figure 8). This solution makes use of WebView HotLink functionality to implement a dynamic database drill-down that will always reflect the latest updates to this database. By clicking different hotspots on the client-side imagemaps in HCM, users are actually triggering server-side pre-formulated SQL (Structured Query Language) queries against an underlying database of resource metadata. The database is registered on HCM server (a Windows 2000/NT 5 IIS Server – Microsoft Internet Information Server/Services) as an ODBC (Open DataBase Connectivity) Data Source (Figure 9) and is the same database we are connecting to in ArcView. We coded the SQL queries in ASP (Active Server Pages) pages for execution on the server. The ASP pages returned to users in their browsers only contain query results in the form of formatted HTML. The actual SQL and ASP code as found in the ASP pages stored on the server is never sent to the end user.

Bottom Line: WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps.This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web.CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Measurement and Information in Medicine, School of Informatics, City University, London EC1V 0HB, UK. M.Nabih-Kamel-Boulos@city.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: HealthCyberMap http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org aims at mapping parts of health information cyberspace in novel ways to deliver a semantically superior user experience. This is achieved through "intelligent" categorisation and interactive hypermedia visualisation of health resources using metadata, clinical codes and GIS. HealthCyberMap is an ArcView 3.1 project. WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps. The basic WebView set-up does not support any GIS database connection, and published Web maps become disconnected from the original project. A dedicated Internet map server would be the best way to serve HealthCyberMap database-driven interactive Web maps, but is an expensive and complex solution to acquire, run and maintain. This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web. RESULTS: The proposed solution is currently used for publishing HealthCyberMap GIS-generated navigational information maps on the Web while maintaining their links with the underlying resource metadata base. CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance. It should be also possible to use the same solution to publish other interactive GIS-driven maps on the Web, e.g., maps of real world health problems.

No MeSH data available.