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A simple method for serving Web hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down.

Boulos MN, Roudsari AV, Carson ER - Int J Health Geogr (2002)

Bottom Line: WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps.This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web.CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Measurement and Information in Medicine, School of Informatics, City University, London EC1V 0HB, UK. M.Nabih-Kamel-Boulos@city.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: HealthCyberMap http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org aims at mapping parts of health information cyberspace in novel ways to deliver a semantically superior user experience. This is achieved through "intelligent" categorisation and interactive hypermedia visualisation of health resources using metadata, clinical codes and GIS. HealthCyberMap is an ArcView 3.1 project. WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps. The basic WebView set-up does not support any GIS database connection, and published Web maps become disconnected from the original project. A dedicated Internet map server would be the best way to serve HealthCyberMap database-driven interactive Web maps, but is an expensive and complex solution to acquire, run and maintain. This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web. RESULTS: The proposed solution is currently used for publishing HealthCyberMap GIS-generated navigational information maps on the Web while maintaining their links with the underlying resource metadata base. CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance. It should be also possible to use the same solution to publish other interactive GIS-driven maps on the Web, e.g., maps of real world health problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web showing the Identify button function Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web . Note the depressed (selected) Identify button in the toolbar on the left and the pop-up message box displaying additional information on Canada after the latter was clicked. Any other information, e.g., health related, could have been displayed instead or additionally depending on what is available in the underlying table in ArcView from which these attributes are "pulled" and associated with the hypermaps when they are generated by WebView. Other buttons on the toolbar allow zooming in and out and panning the map, and activating the HotLink function (instead of Identify), so that clicking a country retrieves the bibliographic cards of resources associated with it in a separate pop-up window. Unlike the dynamic, always up-to-date information (database queries) associated with the HotLink button, information associated with the Identify button is static (exported with the maps from ArcView and detached from the latter) and can be only updated (if needed) by regenerating the maps using WebView.
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Figure 23: Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web showing the Identify button function Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web . Note the depressed (selected) Identify button in the toolbar on the left and the pop-up message box displaying additional information on Canada after the latter was clicked. Any other information, e.g., health related, could have been displayed instead or additionally depending on what is available in the underlying table in ArcView from which these attributes are "pulled" and associated with the hypermaps when they are generated by WebView. Other buttons on the toolbar allow zooming in and out and panning the map, and activating the HotLink function (instead of Identify), so that clicking a country retrieves the bibliographic cards of resources associated with it in a separate pop-up window. Unlike the dynamic, always up-to-date information (database queries) associated with the HotLink button, information associated with the Identify button is static (exported with the maps from ArcView and detached from the latter) and can be only updated (if needed) by regenerating the maps using WebView.

Mentions: - other attribute information can be displayed on mouse click while the Identify button is selected, e.g., to display more country information in a message box based on one or more attribute fields (Figure 23 below); and


A simple method for serving Web hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down.

Boulos MN, Roudsari AV, Carson ER - Int J Health Geogr (2002)

Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web showing the Identify button function Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web . Note the depressed (selected) Identify button in the toolbar on the left and the pop-up message box displaying additional information on Canada after the latter was clicked. Any other information, e.g., health related, could have been displayed instead or additionally depending on what is available in the underlying table in ArcView from which these attributes are "pulled" and associated with the hypermaps when they are generated by WebView. Other buttons on the toolbar allow zooming in and out and panning the map, and activating the HotLink function (instead of Identify), so that clicking a country retrieves the bibliographic cards of resources associated with it in a separate pop-up window. Unlike the dynamic, always up-to-date information (database queries) associated with the HotLink button, information associated with the Identify button is static (exported with the maps from ArcView and detached from the latter) and can be only updated (if needed) by regenerating the maps using WebView.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC131013&req=5

Figure 23: Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web showing the Identify button function Screenshot of HCM World Map on the Web . Note the depressed (selected) Identify button in the toolbar on the left and the pop-up message box displaying additional information on Canada after the latter was clicked. Any other information, e.g., health related, could have been displayed instead or additionally depending on what is available in the underlying table in ArcView from which these attributes are "pulled" and associated with the hypermaps when they are generated by WebView. Other buttons on the toolbar allow zooming in and out and panning the map, and activating the HotLink function (instead of Identify), so that clicking a country retrieves the bibliographic cards of resources associated with it in a separate pop-up window. Unlike the dynamic, always up-to-date information (database queries) associated with the HotLink button, information associated with the Identify button is static (exported with the maps from ArcView and detached from the latter) and can be only updated (if needed) by regenerating the maps using WebView.
Mentions: - other attribute information can be displayed on mouse click while the Identify button is selected, e.g., to display more country information in a message box based on one or more attribute fields (Figure 23 below); and

Bottom Line: WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps.This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web.CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Measurement and Information in Medicine, School of Informatics, City University, London EC1V 0HB, UK. M.Nabih-Kamel-Boulos@city.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
BACKGROUND: HealthCyberMap http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org aims at mapping parts of health information cyberspace in novel ways to deliver a semantically superior user experience. This is achieved through "intelligent" categorisation and interactive hypermedia visualisation of health resources using metadata, clinical codes and GIS. HealthCyberMap is an ArcView 3.1 project. WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps. The basic WebView set-up does not support any GIS database connection, and published Web maps become disconnected from the original project. A dedicated Internet map server would be the best way to serve HealthCyberMap database-driven interactive Web maps, but is an expensive and complex solution to acquire, run and maintain. This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web. RESULTS: The proposed solution is currently used for publishing HealthCyberMap GIS-generated navigational information maps on the Web while maintaining their links with the underlying resource metadata base. CONCLUSION: The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance. It should be also possible to use the same solution to publish other interactive GIS-driven maps on the Web, e.g., maps of real world health problems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus