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Structural and functional aspects of liver sinusoidal endothelial cell fenestrae: a review.

Braet F, Wisse E - Comp Hepatol (2002)

Bottom Line: This review provides a detailed overview of the current state of knowledge about the ultrastructure and dynamics of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae.Various aspects of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae regarding their structure, origin, species specificity, dynamics and formation will be explored.In addition, the role of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae in relation to lipoprotein metabolism, fibrosis and cancer will be approached.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Cell Biology and Histology, Free University of Brussels (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels-Jette, Belgium. filipbra@cyto.vub.ac.be

ABSTRACT
This review provides a detailed overview of the current state of knowledge about the ultrastructure and dynamics of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae. Various aspects of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae regarding their structure, origin, species specificity, dynamics and formation will be explored. In addition, the role of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae in relation to lipoprotein metabolism, fibrosis and cancer will be approached.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Whole-mount transmission electron micrograph of an LSEC treated with 100 nM dihydrohalichondramide for 1 hour, showing the dark nuclear area and surrounding extracted cytoplasm. Note the presence of small cytoplasmatic areas of intermediated density within the fenestrated cytoplasm. In several of these areas a very peculiar structure could be observed, consisting of rows of fenestrae with increasing diameter, fanning out into the surrounding cytoplasm, connected to the small cytoplasmatic areas with their smallest fenestrae. These structures are suggestive of de novo fenestrae formation and we therefore named them "fenestrae-forming center" (FFC) [79]. Scale bar, 5 μm.
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Figure 6: Whole-mount transmission electron micrograph of an LSEC treated with 100 nM dihydrohalichondramide for 1 hour, showing the dark nuclear area and surrounding extracted cytoplasm. Note the presence of small cytoplasmatic areas of intermediated density within the fenestrated cytoplasm. In several of these areas a very peculiar structure could be observed, consisting of rows of fenestrae with increasing diameter, fanning out into the surrounding cytoplasm, connected to the small cytoplasmatic areas with their smallest fenestrae. These structures are suggestive of de novo fenestrae formation and we therefore named them "fenestrae-forming center" (FFC) [79]. Scale bar, 5 μm.

Mentions: In the past we demonstrated that treatment of LSEC with latrunculin A (Fig. 5), swinholide, misakinolide, jasplakinolide, halichondramide or dihydrohalichondramide, all induces an increased number of fenestrae [79,107]. However, only by treating LSEC with misakinolide or dihydrohalichondramide, we were able to capture a novel structure indicative of fenestrae formation, which we propose to call fenestrae-forming center (FFC) (Fig. 6) [79,107]. This illustrates the importance of the use of different anti-actin drugs to study the dynamic cellular processes that depend on the integrity and function of actin. A comparison of all anti-actin agents tested so far, revealed that the only biochemical activity that misakinolide and dihydrohalichondramide have in common is their barbed end capping activity; this activity seems to slow down the process of fenestrae formation to such extent that it becomes possible to resolve fenestrae-forming centers.


Structural and functional aspects of liver sinusoidal endothelial cell fenestrae: a review.

Braet F, Wisse E - Comp Hepatol (2002)

Whole-mount transmission electron micrograph of an LSEC treated with 100 nM dihydrohalichondramide for 1 hour, showing the dark nuclear area and surrounding extracted cytoplasm. Note the presence of small cytoplasmatic areas of intermediated density within the fenestrated cytoplasm. In several of these areas a very peculiar structure could be observed, consisting of rows of fenestrae with increasing diameter, fanning out into the surrounding cytoplasm, connected to the small cytoplasmatic areas with their smallest fenestrae. These structures are suggestive of de novo fenestrae formation and we therefore named them "fenestrae-forming center" (FFC) [79]. Scale bar, 5 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC131011&req=5

Figure 6: Whole-mount transmission electron micrograph of an LSEC treated with 100 nM dihydrohalichondramide for 1 hour, showing the dark nuclear area and surrounding extracted cytoplasm. Note the presence of small cytoplasmatic areas of intermediated density within the fenestrated cytoplasm. In several of these areas a very peculiar structure could be observed, consisting of rows of fenestrae with increasing diameter, fanning out into the surrounding cytoplasm, connected to the small cytoplasmatic areas with their smallest fenestrae. These structures are suggestive of de novo fenestrae formation and we therefore named them "fenestrae-forming center" (FFC) [79]. Scale bar, 5 μm.
Mentions: In the past we demonstrated that treatment of LSEC with latrunculin A (Fig. 5), swinholide, misakinolide, jasplakinolide, halichondramide or dihydrohalichondramide, all induces an increased number of fenestrae [79,107]. However, only by treating LSEC with misakinolide or dihydrohalichondramide, we were able to capture a novel structure indicative of fenestrae formation, which we propose to call fenestrae-forming center (FFC) (Fig. 6) [79,107]. This illustrates the importance of the use of different anti-actin drugs to study the dynamic cellular processes that depend on the integrity and function of actin. A comparison of all anti-actin agents tested so far, revealed that the only biochemical activity that misakinolide and dihydrohalichondramide have in common is their barbed end capping activity; this activity seems to slow down the process of fenestrae formation to such extent that it becomes possible to resolve fenestrae-forming centers.

Bottom Line: This review provides a detailed overview of the current state of knowledge about the ultrastructure and dynamics of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae.Various aspects of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae regarding their structure, origin, species specificity, dynamics and formation will be explored.In addition, the role of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae in relation to lipoprotein metabolism, fibrosis and cancer will be approached.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Cell Biology and Histology, Free University of Brussels (VUB), Laarbeeklaan 103, 1090 Brussels-Jette, Belgium. filipbra@cyto.vub.ac.be

ABSTRACT
This review provides a detailed overview of the current state of knowledge about the ultrastructure and dynamics of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae. Various aspects of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae regarding their structure, origin, species specificity, dynamics and formation will be explored. In addition, the role of liver sinusoidal endothelial fenestrae in relation to lipoprotein metabolism, fibrosis and cancer will be approached.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus